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Rescooped by Ann-Laure Liéval from Geography Education
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India and Pakistan Reunited

"It’s rare that a video from a brand will spark any real emotion--but a new spot from Google India is so powerful, and so honest to the product, that it’s a testament not only to the deft touch of the ad team that put it together, but to the strength of Google’s current offering."--Forbes


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Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 2014 2:36 PM

This ad not only demonstrates how Google is allowing for people all over the world to come together, it is also an expertly devised commentary on a real life event that happened in this part of the world, and the emotional implications that it caused. The video shows how the grandchildren of two men were able to utilize Google in order to bring the two friends together after years apart. The two gentlemen were once good friends, but had not seen each other since the Pakistani-Indian conflict. The conflict tore families and friends apart, and remains today as a sensitive topic to those affected by the event. 

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, December 15, 2014 7:33 PM

This video is a perfect example of ho, especially in this day and age, the world can be brought closer together. In the video, two childhood friends are reunited after years of being apart, due to the conflicts go on their country. This shows one of the positive of the technology we have access to today, being able to bring together old friends by using new ways is great. This video also goes to show that even though the world is an enormous place, it can be made smaller.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 2:38 AM

This video is reminiscent of the families separated during the Korean war recently being allowed to visit one another. While tensions still exist between India and Pakistan many have begun to come to peace with the concept their nations won't be unified under either's rule. Because of this cooling of tensions families and friends are now able to see each other again after years without seeing them. Of course this is a Google commercial so the sincerity is somewhat diminished because of it's origins.

Rescooped by Ann-Laure Liéval from History and Social Studies Education
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In Remembrance: Teaching September 11

In Remembrance: Teaching September 11 | CLIL-DNL History | Scoop.it

The the United States, 9/11 is memorialized in our landscapes and is etched in our collective consciousness.  This coming Tuesday is the anniversary and Teaching History has put together a host of teaching materials about the importance, impact of the terrorist attacks of Septemper 11th, 2001 on the United States and the world.

 

Tags: Landscape, terrorism, conflict, states, political, place, historical, unit 4 political.

 


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Aaron Feliciano's comment, September 12, 2012 5:47 PM
9/11 will always be remembered in the eyes of americans and they will never forget what they were doing that day. i know i will not
Rescooped by Ann-Laure Liéval from Geography Education
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Choices Program--Scholars Online

Choices Program--Scholars Online | CLIL-DNL History | Scoop.it

Scholars Online Videos feature top scholars answering a specific question in his or her field of expertise. These brief and informative videos are designed to supplement the Choices Program curricula.


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Ann-Laure Liéval's insight:

about The Middle East and frontiers: a short video to better understand this country's history. 

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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 15, 2014 7:01 PM

Afghanistan is without a doubt one of the most unstable nations in the Middle East today. Why is this? This video explains that the borders of the nation were artificially drawn by the British and Russian empires to serve as a boundary between them. Because they simply wanted a buffer zone they devoted little energy to making sure the various people within the borders would get along. Because of this falling the Europeans created a country with a diverse population that has for centuries created instability and chaos.  

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 1:20 PM

Much of Afghanistan, both culturally and politically, has developed through the interests of other, larger geopolitical forces. The current borders are a reflection of previous empires, like the Russian and British Empires, and superpowers, like the Soviet Union and United States. Even parts of their culture, like holidays, are influences from other regions.

Louis Mazza's curator insight, March 25, 2:59 PM

In this video Jennifer L. Fluri explains the borders of Afghanistan. At first Afghanistan was used as a border outline between Russia and British India. The border facing India was named the Durand line, after Sir Durand, who convinced the leader of Afghanistan to respect the line.  There is Iranian/Persian influence in Afghanistan also with the celebration of Nowruz, the Iranian/Persian New Year. That is because Southern Afghanistan was part of Iran in 1502-1736, under the Safavid Empire. Also Dari is one of the main languages spoken in Afghanistan which came from Persia. She ends the video saying “where Afghanistan is today both culturally and geopolitically has to do with their geography”

Rescooped by Ann-Laure Liéval from History and Social Studies Education
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Election 2012: Teaching Ideas and Resources

Election 2012: Teaching Ideas and Resources | CLIL-DNL History | Scoop.it

We suggested ways to teach about Election 2012 and included links to lesson plans and Times features, and we'll be updating the page regularly as the march to the White House proceeds.

 

The Learning Network has partnered with the NY Times to produce lesson plans for all ages (and all disciplines) on how to teach using the 2012 United States Presidential Election. 


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