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Colonization and Independence in Africa | Brown University

Colonization and Independence in Africa | Brown University | CLIL-DNL History | Scoop.it

In the late nineteenth century, Europe's great powers claimed the African continent for themselves. In the guise of a humanitarian mission, European leaders and businesses exploited African natural resources and people to fuel European economic growth. Africans did not submit to outside control willingly. In fact, African resistance continued throughout the colonial period, culminating in the independence movements of the mid-twentieth century.

Africa is a vast continent—more than three times the size of the United States—with more than 50 countries and thousands of ethnic groups and societies. African experiences of colonialism were diverse. Nevertheless, there are common themes within the continent's colonial history and its legacies. Colonization and Independence in Africa explores these themes generally, as well as specifically through four country case studies: Ghana, Algeria, Kenya, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The readings and activities help students consider the perspectives of Africans and the ways in which they responded to European colonialism.


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 7, 2014 12:08 PM

This provides excellent teaching resources on African independence and the end of colonization. 

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A brief history of the U.S. and Cuba

150 years of tension may be coming to an end.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, April 12, 4:02 PM

 

This video offers some good perspective on the competing historical visions that help to shape the tension between the United States and Cuba.  I enjoyed this one because it explicitly states during what many refer to as the age of imperialism.

 

Questions to Ponder:  How would you feel about the normalizing of political and economic relations between the United States and Cuba if you grew up in Cuba?  What if you were from a Cuban-American family that fled Castro's regime?   

 

TagsCuba, historical, conflict, political, geopoliticscolonialism, video.

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A global guide to the first world war - interactive documentary

A global guide to the first world war - interactive documentary | CLIL-DNL History | Scoop.it
Ten historians from 10 countries give a brief history of the first world war through a global lens. Using original news reports, interactive maps and rarely seen footage, including extraordinary shots of troops crossing Mesopotamia on camels and Italians fighting high up in the Alps, the half hour film explores the war and its effect from many different perspectives. Watch the documentary in English, French, German, Italian, Spanish, Arabic or Hindi.
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From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century

From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century | CLIL-DNL History | Scoop.it
Today's volume of immigrants, in some ways, is a return to America’s past.

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Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, February 5, 2015 2:12 PM

Many people in 2015 feel that immigration-reform is an absolute must for America.  They usually use words like, "illegal", "terrorists", or "welfare-recipients" to try and scare the rest of the country into thinking immigration has spiraled out of control.  Immigration definitely has a different make-up from a hundred years ago, but that doesn't equate to it being a problem.

 

An article like this puts much into perspective.  What most naive and ignorant immigration-reformers might not now before reading this article is that the proportion of our current population has a fewer percentage of immigrants than back in 1910.  This fact is totally opposite from the picture that some critics try to draw, essentially, comparing immigration to millions of fire-ants invading our country.

 

Most immigrants now come from Latin America, whereas, in 1910 they came from Germany.  By reading the article, common sense will tell you that there might be more of a "racism" problem than an "immigration" problem in America.

Benjamin Jackson's curator insight, September 16, 2015 1:03 PM

Its interesting to me how the primary source of immigrants only shifts from Germany to Mexico in the 1990's, as opposed to when the country was cut in half in the fifties or during WWII. I had always thought that those events would limit German immigration more, however it appears that the primary reason for the shift is more due to the recent (relatively) drug war which erupted in Mexico.

Corine Ramos's curator insight, December 8, 2015 8:21 PM

The source of migrants today has changed the cultural composition of the United States from what is was 100 years ago.  Cultures are not static and migration is one of the key drivers of change. These maps produced by the Pew Research Center. Despite what media reports would have you believe, immigration into the United States is not on the rise, but maps such as these can be construed to imagine that there is a flow of immigrant coming from south of the border.  The reality is that migration from Mexico to the United States has steadily dropped since 1999.  


Tags: migration, historical, USA, mapping, census, ethnicity.

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Stunning D-Day Maps From TIME Magazine

Stunning D-Day Maps From TIME Magazine | CLIL-DNL History | Scoop.it
World War II-era maps conjure a period in history when titanic forces were on the move, or were stuck in brutal stalemate, all over the globe.

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Lee Hall's curator insight, May 30, 2014 9:42 AM

You can also find film footage of Capa's picture of the man in the surf of Normandy that was later published in Life magazine.

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The First World War | The National Archives

The First World War | The National Archives | CLIL-DNL History | Scoop.it
The National Archives is marking the centenary of the First World War with an extensive programme, spanning a five-year period from June 2014 - June 2019.
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Global Perceptions of the United States

Global Perceptions of the United States | CLIL-DNL History | Scoop.it
Placeholder for the Pew Global Indicators Database

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Adilson Camacho's curator insight, February 22, 2014 12:18 AM

Images...

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, March 19, 2014 4:25 PM

Kenya is measure as a parter and alliance with the United States for instance, in the Fall of 2009 a report came out and it proved taht 89% thought of Kenya as an alliance. Shockingly enough in 2013 the alliance with Africa drew at a small decrease of 79%.

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 2014 8:05 PM

APHG-U1 & U3

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Colonization and Independence in Africa | Brown University

Colonization and Independence in Africa | Brown University | CLIL-DNL History | Scoop.it

In the late nineteenth century, Europe's great powers claimed the African continent for themselves. In the guise of a humanitarian mission, European leaders and businesses exploited African natural resources and people to fuel European economic growth. Africans did not submit to outside control willingly. In fact, African resistance continued throughout the colonial period, culminating in the independence movements of the mid-twentieth century.

Africa is a vast continent—more than three times the size of the United States—with more than 50 countries and thousands of ethnic groups and societies. African experiences of colonialism were diverse. Nevertheless, there are common themes within the continent's colonial history and its legacies. Colonization and Independence in Africa explores these themes generally, as well as specifically through four country case studies: Ghana, Algeria, Kenya, and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The readings and activities help students consider the perspectives of Africans and the ways in which they responded to European colonialism.


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 7, 2014 12:08 PM

This provides excellent teaching resources on African independence and the end of colonization. 

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The map that caused a century of trouble

The map that caused a century of trouble | CLIL-DNL History | Scoop.it
Ann-Laure Liéval's insight:

Middle East borders and the French and British sphere of influence. 

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How the British (literally) Landscaped the World

How the British (literally) Landscaped the World | CLIL-DNL History | Scoop.it

"Did you hear about the Five Pillars of British Landscaping Empire during your religion classes? To sort them by order of importance within the Holy Book of Grass: First is Grass. Second is pasture grass (this one comes with fences). Third is leisure grass. Forth is golf grass. Fifth is: you never have enough flowers & cute little benches on your grass."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 19, 2013 8:55 AM

I've written in the past about the aesthetics of the an ideal British landscape (as embodied in the anthem Jerusalem).  The British ideal was to tame nature; the Canadians on the other hand, embraced the wildness of the natural landscapeThose difference normative views of landscape helped to shape national identity and inform land use decision-making processes.     

megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 1:33 AM
This article talks about how the British are the ones who shaped landscaping for the rest of the world. Growing grass in places where grass didnt grow or cute park benches. The pictures of the Bristish landscape were all lush and beautiful. I never knew where the idea of lanscaping had come from.
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The voice of Albert Einstein

The voice of Albert Einstein | CLIL-DNL History | Scoop.it
Have you ever heard Albert Einstein talking? In the fall of 1941, Albert Einstein gave this extraordinary reading of his essay "The Common Language of Science" to the British Association for the Advancement of Science.
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Researchers build 'Google Earth' project for the ancient world

Researchers build 'Google Earth' project for the ancient world | CLIL-DNL History | Scoop.it
A new search tool connects UK places with historic maps and documents, from the ancient world right up to 1492. By Samuel Gibbs
Ann-Laure Liéval's insight:

GE pour l'histoire de l'Antiquité et du Moyen Age

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This Haunting Animation Maps the Journeys of 15,790 Slave Ships in Two Minutes

This Haunting Animation Maps the Journeys of 15,790 Slave Ships in Two Minutes | CLIL-DNL History | Scoop.it
This interactive, designed and built by Slate’s Andrew Kahn, gives you a sense of the scale of the trans-Atlantic slave trade across time, as well as the flow of transport and eventual destinations. The dots—which represent individual slave ships—also correspond to the size of each voyage. The larger the dot, the more enslaved people on board. And if you pause the map and click on a dot, you’ll learn about the ship’s flag—was it British? Portuguese? French?—its origin point, its destination, and its history in the slave trade. The interactive animates more than 20,000 voyages cataloged in the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade Database.

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Armando's curator insight, June 28, 2015 6:59 AM

This Haunting Animation Maps the Journeys of 15,790 Slave Ships in Two Minutes

Denise Patrylo-Murray's curator insight, July 8, 2015 9:40 PM

Use for Global History warm up.

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World War I Centenary: 100 Legacies of the Great War

World War I Centenary: 100 Legacies of the Great War | CLIL-DNL History | Scoop.it
To mark the World War I centenary, The Wall Street Journal selects 100 legacies from World War I that continue to shape our lives today.
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Remembering A Civil Rights Swim-In: 'It Was A Milestone'

Remembering A Civil Rights Swim-In: 'It Was A Milestone' | CLIL-DNL History | Scoop.it
Fifty years ago, J.T. Johnson and Al Lingo jumped into a whites-only pool in Florida as part of a civil rights protest. They were taken to jail — after the hotel owner poured acid into the water.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 13, 2014 11:41 AM

Sometimes it's horrible events like these that leads to great steps towards progress. 

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A Brief History of U.S. Diplomacy

A Brief History of U.S. Diplomacy | CLIL-DNL History | Scoop.it
Ann-Laure Liéval's insight:

Les chemins de la puissances: USA et le monde, entre isolationnisme et interventionnisme

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A New World Order...

A New World Order... | CLIL-DNL History | Scoop.it

"People outside Independence Hall examining a new map of Europe before the end of WW1, in Philadelphia, October 1918" http://pic.twitter.com/pJIYeXJuj6 ;


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The Invention Of 'The Economy'

The Invention Of 'The Economy' | CLIL-DNL History | Scoop.it

"Until the Great Depression, nobody talked about 'the economy.' In a sense, it hadn't been invented yet."


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Darius Douglass's curator insight, March 3, 2014 3:59 PM

A little history here, What we call the GDP is not really scientific #GDP #NationalIncome  #indicator #health

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, March 4, 2014 1:54 PM

Seth Dixon has it right. 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, April 26, 2014 4:01 PM

The parameters of the measure of the economy are so broad that the numbers don't really mean anything. Each country counts different things. The GDP of the US cannot be compared to the GDP of other countries because the cost of living in each place is so wildly different. When compared to Japan our economies are close but compared to any country in Africa they are completely different. Measurement of the economy is not an overly useful number.

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The Real Pirates of the Caribbean

The Real Pirates of the Caribbean | CLIL-DNL History | Scoop.it
Explore the travels and exploits of five real pirates of the Caribbean. Click through the tabs to track the adventures of each pirate overlaid on Spanish ports and pirate strongholds in the area. Zoom into the map to see additional detail.
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Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 11, 2015 10:00 PM

This pirate excursion map is so cool and gives a great look at the travels of different pirates.  As we get farther away from these time periods, it seems like the idea of these Caribbean pirates are fictional.  To hear true historical events about these individual pirates is very interesting.  I would  love to take a time machine back to Port Royal during these times to experience that madness.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 28, 2015 9:34 AM

Imagine the horror a native of the Caribbean must have felt when white men came into their scenic lands and pillaged their villages and plundered their treasuries? Blackbeard otherwise known as Edward Teach, would light slow burning cannon fuses and place them in his beard to create an aura about him as he fought and raided these port of call. Calico Jack Rackham, a great pirate name if there ever was one, was best known for having  a pair of female pirates aboard. Instantly becomes one of my heroes! Then you have William Parker who was actually an opportunist backed by England who plundered Spanish treasures throughout Central America. Here is my favorite pirate joke; what is a pirate's favorite letter? "R" you say? No, it's the letter "C", pirates love the sea....

Helen Teague's curator insight, September 14, 2015 9:28 AM

very interesting interactive map

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ChronoZoom

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Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, January 9, 2014 1:14 PM

La Universidad de Berkeley, la Universidad de Moscú, y Microsoft se han unido para elaborar Chronozoom, una singular herramienta educativa. Es una atractiva línea del tiempo para comprender todo el pasado desde el Big Bang hasta el tiempo presente en una visión panorámica.

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America's Place in the World

The latest edition of the Pew Research Center's quadrennial survey (http://pewrsr.ch/ICEEDU) finds that for the first time in nearly 40 years a majority of t...
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India and Pakistan Reunited

"It’s rare that a video from a brand will spark any real emotion--but a new spot from Google India is so powerful, and so honest to the product, that it’s a testament not only to the deft touch of the ad team that put it together, but to the strength of Google’s current offering."--Forbes


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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 17, 2014 2:38 AM

This video is reminiscent of the families separated during the Korean war recently being allowed to visit one another. While tensions still exist between India and Pakistan many have begun to come to peace with the concept their nations won't be unified under either's rule. Because of this cooling of tensions families and friends are now able to see each other again after years without seeing them. Of course this is a Google commercial so the sincerity is somewhat diminished because of it's origins.

Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 3:11 PM

The most intriguing commercial that shows the differences and consequences of what happens between two nations. It shows hurt and feelings no human should have to go through. The biggest thing with this is how that after so much time apart two different people of different religions or countries can come back together and remain friends after so long of conflicting issues.

MA Sansonetti-Wood's curator insight, January 26, 9:29 PM
Seth Dixon's insight:

True, this is a commercial--but what a great commercial to show that the history of of a geopolitical conflict has many casualties including friendships across lines.  This isn't the only commercial in India that is raising eyebrows.  This one from a jewelry company is proudly showing a divorced woman remarrying--something unthinkable for Indian TV one generation ago. 


Questions to Ponder: How does the Indian media reflect the values and beliefs of Indian culture?  How does the Indian media shape Indian culture?

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Civil War Battles & Casualties

Civil War Battles & Casualties | CLIL-DNL History | Scoop.it

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Kristen McDaniel's curator insight, November 18, 2013 1:11 PM

Awesome interactive map of Civil War battles

Arlis Groves's curator insight, November 25, 2013 9:09 PM

This interactive map can be a helpful resource for details about battle casualties.

Teresa M. Nash's comment, November 28, 2013 2:20 AM
Awesome!