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From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century

From Germany to Mexico: How America’s source of immigrants has changed over a century | CLIL-DNL History | Scoop.it
Today's volume of immigrants, in some ways, is a return to America’s past.

Via Seth Dixon
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Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:24 PM

The reason this article and maps are so important is because it shows that immigration isn't a new aspect of the American way of life. Historically people from across the globe flocked to America from Europe and Asia and today we're seeing increasing immigration from Central and South Americans as well as those fleeing unstable areas in the Middle East and Eastern Europe.

Lena Minassian's curator insight, February 4, 6:56 PM

This article was very interesting to look at. I had knowledge that the majority of the immigrant population came from Mexico but it gave a different perspective to see it on a map. The one aspect that caught my attention was how the map of the United States looked like in 1910. The majority of the immigrants back then came from Europe, mainly Germany. Germany was the top country birth among U.S. immigrants because it was very dominating. 

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, February 5, 2:12 PM

Many people in 2015 feel that immigration-reform is an absolute must for America.  They usually use words like, "illegal", "terrorists", or "welfare-recipients" to try and scare the rest of the country into thinking immigration has spiraled out of control.  Immigration definitely has a different make-up from a hundred years ago, but that doesn't equate to it being a problem.

 

An article like this puts much into perspective.  What most naive and ignorant immigration-reformers might not now before reading this article is that the proportion of our current population has a fewer percentage of immigrants than back in 1910.  This fact is totally opposite from the picture that some critics try to draw, essentially, comparing immigration to millions of fire-ants invading our country.

 

Most immigrants now come from Latin America, whereas, in 1910 they came from Germany.  By reading the article, common sense will tell you that there might be more of a "racism" problem than an "immigration" problem in America.

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The Real Pirates of the Caribbean

The Real Pirates of the Caribbean | CLIL-DNL History | Scoop.it
Explore the travels and exploits of five real pirates of the Caribbean. Click through the tabs to track the adventures of each pirate overlaid on Spanish ports and pirate strongholds in the area. Zoom into the map to see additional detail.
Via Seth Dixon
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Lena Minassian's curator insight, February 4, 7:04 PM

This map was fun to explore because if its interactive nature. It shows the travels of the five actual pirates of the Caribbean in the colonial-era. It describes each pirate and what they were known for. You were able to actually follow their routes and click on all the ports and learn about why they were important. Every pirate has a legend that you can click on to help guide you through the story map. This map even went further to show where there was a treasure fleet or a Spanish mine. Fun way to look at this!

Louis Mazza's curator insight, February 5, 1:37 PM

This is an interactive map that takes you along the routes of the real pirates of the Caribbean. These pirates sailed mainly along the Atlantic coast of the America's with some venturing further eastward. this maps shares the story of 5 famous pirates. Some pirates like William Parker, an Englishman made their living robbing Spanish treasure fleets.  other pirates like Blackbeard, known for his imposing size and black beard relied more on his reputation that continuous acts to strike fear into others. when Blackbeard pulled up, give up the treasure, HAHA. others like Henry Morgan went on to bigger things, Morgan became a lieutenant governor of Jamaica.

lieutenant governor of Jamaica.lieutenant governor of Jamaica.lieutenant governor of Jamaica.
Jared Medeiros's curator insight, February 11, 10:00 PM

This pirate excursion map is so cool and gives a great look at the travels of different pirates.  As we get farther away from these time periods, it seems like the idea of these Caribbean pirates are fictional.  To hear true historical events about these individual pirates is very interesting.  I would  love to take a time machine back to Port Royal during these times to experience that madness.

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Choices Program--Scholars Online

Choices Program--Scholars Online | CLIL-DNL History | Scoop.it

Scholars Online Videos feature top scholars answering a specific question in his or her field of expertise. These brief and informative videos are designed to supplement the Choices Program curricula.


Via Seth Dixon
Ann-Laure Liéval's insight:

about The Middle East and frontiers: a short video to better understand this country's history. 

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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, November 2, 2014 10:17 PM

This video shows how Afghanistan's very geography was used to ease some of the tension between Russia and British India. Using the Wakhan Border both the countries surrounding Afghanistan would not share a common border.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 15, 2014 7:01 PM

Afghanistan is without a doubt one of the most unstable nations in the Middle East today. Why is this? This video explains that the borders of the nation were artificially drawn by the British and Russian empires to serve as a boundary between them. Because they simply wanted a buffer zone they devoted little energy to making sure the various people within the borders would get along. Because of this falling the Europeans created a country with a diverse population that has for centuries created instability and chaos.  

Alec Castagno's curator insight, December 17, 2014 1:20 PM

Much of Afghanistan, both culturally and politically, has developed through the interests of other, larger geopolitical forces. The current borders are a reflection of previous empires, like the Russian and British Empires, and superpowers, like the Soviet Union and United States. Even parts of their culture, like holidays, are influences from other regions.

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How The USA Expanded In One Mesmerizing Animated GIF

How The USA Expanded In One Mesmerizing Animated GIF | CLIL-DNL History | Scoop.it

Amazing work from wikipedia, summarizing the evolution of the US formation, originally here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Territorial_evolution_of_the_United_States

 

Tags: USA, historical, visualization. 


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Paige T's comment, September 17, 2012 10:19 AM
This is very interesting because I had no idea that the United States had gone under such transformation. Even within certain borders, there is much change in respect to who the area belongs to. You definitely have to watch it a few times to get the full affect though.
Lindsey Robinson's comment, September 17, 2012 10:21 AM
Although the moving image makes it hard to actually pinpoint the U.S expansion at specific dates, I don't think that is the point of the map. The point of the map is to show how many times territories have changed, etc. I really like the map.. I have never seen anything like it.
Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 17, 2012 10:42 AM
The United States has changed drastically through the years with state borders, but I noticed that the regions' labels of the country are still similar today. For example, the southwest is much more divided today but still classified as a region with plenty of Spanish culture.
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In Remembrance: Teaching September 11

In Remembrance: Teaching September 11 | CLIL-DNL History | Scoop.it

The the United States, 9/11 is memorialized in our landscapes and is etched in our collective consciousness.  This coming Tuesday is the anniversary and Teaching History has put together a host of teaching materials about the importance, impact of the terrorist attacks of Septemper 11th, 2001 on the United States and the world.

 

Tags: Landscape, terrorism, conflict, states, political, place, historical, unit 4 political.

 


Via Seth Dixon
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Aaron Feliciano's comment, September 12, 2012 5:47 PM
9/11 will always be remembered in the eyes of americans and they will never forget what they were doing that day. i know i will not
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The Invention Of 'The Economy'

The Invention Of 'The Economy' | CLIL-DNL History | Scoop.it

"Until the Great Depression, nobody talked about 'the economy.' In a sense, it hadn't been invented yet."


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Darius Douglass's curator insight, March 3, 2014 3:59 PM

A little history here, What we call the GDP is not really scientific #GDP #NationalIncome  #indicator #health

Stephen Zimmett's curator insight, March 4, 2014 1:54 PM

Seth Dixon has it right. 

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, April 26, 2014 4:01 PM

The parameters of the measure of the economy are so broad that the numbers don't really mean anything. Each country counts different things. The GDP of the US cannot be compared to the GDP of other countries because the cost of living in each place is so wildly different. When compared to Japan our economies are close but compared to any country in Africa they are completely different. Measurement of the economy is not an overly useful number.

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Stanford History Education Group

Stanford History Education Group | CLIL-DNL History | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
Ann-Laure Liéval's insight:

Des plans de cours et des documents sur l'histoire des USA et du monde. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 29, 2013 11:38 AM

The Stanford History Education Group has amassed some great resources for social studies teachers.  Their chief resources is a program called Reading Like a Historian.  The program has 71 stand-alone lessons for U.S. History organized within 11 units. These lessons span colonial to Cold War America and cover a range of political, social, economic, and cultural topics. They are continuing to expand the Reading Like a Historian program to World History.  Currently there are 15 lessons from across the world history sequence with more lesson plans under development that will be released in the next few months.


Tags: historical, teacher training.

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Creating American Borders

30-second animation of the changes in U.S. historical county boundaries, 1629 - 2000. Historical state and territorial boundaries are also displayed from 178...

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Jesse Olsen's comment, March 16, 2013 1:04 PM
Whooooaaaaaaa!!!!
Betty Klug's curator insight, April 27, 2013 3:50 PM

I love animation maps.  Great for getting students interested in learning.

Samuel D'Amore's curator insight, December 14, 2014 6:36 PM

This video does a fantastic job of showing how the United States has expanded and grown since its original 13 colonies. While many today might imagine that our nation was simply always this size in fact over many years of colonization, land purchases and land grabs America has eventually become what it is today.

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Mapping the Nation

Mapping the Nation | CLIL-DNL History | Scoop.it

This link is a companion site to the book, "Mapping the Nation: History & Cartography in 19th Century America" by Susan Schulten.  The author and publisher have made all of the images available digitally, and they are organized by chapter as well as chronologically. This a great resource to find some of the important maps that shaped America and help mold the manner in which we conceptualize America. Geography and history teachers alike will be able to draw on these materials. The chapters include:

The Graphic Foundations of American History Capturing the Past Through Maps Disease, Expansion and the Rise of Environmental Mapping Slavery and the Origin of Statistical Cartography The Cartographic Consolidating of America

 


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