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80% of Americans Live Within 20 Miles of a Starbucks

80% of Americans Live Within 20 Miles of a Starbucks | CLIL-DNL Geography | Scoop.it

The green dots on this map representing Starbucks locations which are obviously clustered in major metropolitan centers.  Cross-referencing this Starbucks address location with population data, Davenport explains his mapping technique: "By counting the number of people who live within a given distance to each Starbucks, we can measure how well centered Frappuccinos are to the US citizenry. In other words: draw a 1-mile circle around every store, then add up the % of the population living within the circles. Repeat for 2, 3, 4....100 miles."   The result of this data is a fabulous logrithmic S-curve which explains much about the American population distribution.   

 

Tags: statistics, density, consumption, mapping, visualization, urban.


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Rich's comment, October 10, 2012 10:26 AM
That is insane how large that corperation is.
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The Language of Maps Kids Should Know

The Language of Maps Kids Should Know | CLIL-DNL Geography | Scoop.it
The vocabulary and concepts of maps kids should learn to enhance their map-skills & geography awareness. Concise definitions with clear illustrations.



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Anita Vance's curator insight, June 30, 5:54 AM

This article helps give an early start to map skill implementation - even at the earliest levels.

DTLLS tutor's curator insight, July 1, 2:04 AM

Love this website. Not just this article, but the whole idea. Have a little browse around...

wereldvak's curator insight, July 6, 11:53 AM

De taal van de kaart: welke  woordenschat hebben kinderen nodig om de kaart te kunnen lezen?

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NAFTA an empty basket for farmers in southern Mexico

NAFTA an empty basket for farmers in southern Mexico | CLIL-DNL Geography | Scoop.it

"When the agreement between the United States, Mexico and Canada went into effect in 1994, it removed nearly all trade barriers between the countries. Among the industries affected was agriculture, forcing small Mexican farmers into direct competition with big American agribusiness. Cheap American corn – heavily subsidized, mechanized and genetically modified – soon flooded the Mexican market to the detriment of local farmers.  As U.S. farmers exported their subsidized corn to Mexico, local producer prices plummeted and small farmers could no longer earn enough to live on."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, May 28, 6:06 AM

International trade agreements are usually discussed at the national level.  "NAFTA benefits Mexico" is a commonly heard saying because trade with the United States and Canada strengthens the manufacturing sector in Mexico.  Even if there is an overall benefit to a country, there are always winners and losers for different regions, economic sectors and many other demographic groups.   Farmers in southern Mexico were certainly a sector that struggled mightily under NAFTA.


Tags: Mexicosupranationalism, industry, place, agriculture, food production,

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, May 29, 8:44 AM

The American agricultural industry has been highly subsidized by the government to create interest in farming and food production. This causes problems for America's neighboring countries' resident farmers. The Mexican corn farmers are struggling mightily with the influx of cheap American corn into Mexico due to the open trade policies created by NAFTA. Some tariffs or new economic regulations must be created to protect Mexican corn farmers and regulate the amount of cheap American corn that is flooding Mexican markets. 

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The End of the ‘Developing World’

The End of the ‘Developing World’ | CLIL-DNL Geography | Scoop.it
The old labels no longer apply. Rich countries need to learn from poor ones.

 

BILL GATES, in his foundation’s annual letter, declared that “the terms ‘developing countries’ and ‘developed countries’ have outlived their usefulness.” He’s right. If we want to understand the modern global economy, we need a better vocabulary.

Mr. Gates was making a point about improvements in income and gross domestic product; unfortunately, these formal measures generate categories that tend to obscure obvious distinctions. Only when employing a crude “development” binary could anyone lump Mozambique and Mexico together.

It’s tough to pick a satisfying replacement. Talk of first, second and third worlds is passé, and it’s hard to bear the Dickensian awkwardness of “industrialized nations.” Forget, too, the more recent jargon about the “global south” and “global north.” It makes little sense to counterpose poor countries with “the West” when many of the biggest economic success stories in the past few decades have come from the East.

All of these antiquated terms imply that any given country is “developing” toward something, and that there is only one way to get there.

It’s time that we start describing the world as “fat” or “lean.”


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Joanne Wegener's curator insight, March 7, 2:03 AM

Fat or Lean - what sort of world do we live in

An interesting discussion on the way we perceive and label the world.

Ma. Caridad Benitez's curator insight, March 11, 7:15 AM

Hoy en día poca claridad de dónde exactamente queda y quiénes son? 

Seth Dixon's curator insight, March 13, 7:46 AM

UPDATE: this article (from the Atlantic) on the exact same concept would supplement the NY Times article nicely.  

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No union, no pound, British official warns Scots backing independence

No union, no pound, British official warns Scots backing independence | CLIL-DNL Geography | Scoop.it
LONDON – Escalating the fight against secession, the British government warned Thursday that Scotland would lose the right to continue using the pound as its currency if voters there say yes to a historic referendum on independence this fall.

 

Osborne’s stark warning, delivered in a speech in Edinburgh, the Scottish capital, represented a new willingness by unionists to take a hard line in persuading Scottish voters to shun independence in a September plebiscite. A thumbs-up would end Scotland’s 307-year-old marriage to England and Wales and cause the biggest political shakeup in the British Isles since Ireland split from the British crown nearly a century ago.

 

Sturgeon predicted that “what the Treasury says now in the heat of the campaign would be very different to what they say after a democratic vote for independence, when common sense would trump the campaign rhetoric.”


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, February 15, 12:34 PM

This is an intriguing strategic move by the UK as Scotland considers  independence.  Some have argued that this move will backfire and push more Scottish voters into the "yes" camp.  In related news, the BBC reports that EU officials say that an independent Scotland would have a hard time joining the European Union.  


Tags: devolutionpolitical, states, sovereignty, autonomy, Europe, unit 4 political, currency, economic.
.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 4, 6:40 AM

The countries of Britain want their independence. Scotland uses the pound just like England and Wales but its being threatened that the government might take away that right to use that monetary system. 

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« Fuck the EU » : pourquoi les Américains n’aiment pas l’Europe - Rue89

« Fuck the EU » : pourquoi les Américains n’aiment pas l’Europe - Rue89 | CLIL-DNL Geography | Scoop.it
Le grand avantage des fuites, c'est qu'elles permettent d'approcher au plus près ce que pensent réellement les individus "piratés".C'est le cas avec le magnifique "Fuck the EU" (traduction libre : "Que l'Union européenne aille se faire foutre") de Victoria Nuland, la secrétaire d'Etat adjointe des Etats-Unis en charge de l'Europe, prononcé avec entrain dans une conversation téléphonique qui s'est "mystérieusement" retrouvée sur YouTube.La diplomate (le mot n'est guère approprié en l’occurrence)...
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Megacities @ National Geographic Magazine

Megacities @ National Geographic Magazine | CLIL-DNL Geography | Scoop.it
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Follow the Things

"Who makes the things that we buy?  Few of us know. They seem untouched by human hands. Occasionally there's a news story, a documentary film, or an artwork showing the hidden ingredients in our coffee, t-shirts, or iPads. They often 'expose' unpleasant working conditions to encourage more 'ethical' consumer or corporate behaviour. followthethings.com is this work's 'online store'. Here you can find out who has followed what, why and how; the techniques used to 'grab' its audiences; the discussions and impacts that this has provoked; and how to follow things yourself."


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About Globalisation, flows and production today. 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 9, 2013 1:31 PM

Where did your T-Shirt come from?   Where did the food your parents bought at the grocery store come from?  What's the origin of the components in your cell phone?  These questions all allude to what geographers call a commodity chain analysis.  Analyzing where the consumer goods that we use every day came from can make global issues hit a little closer to home and reinforce concepts such as globalization. The website Follow the Things is a great resource for teaching students about commodity chains and mapping out your own personal geographies.


Tags: industry, economic, globalization, consumption.

Fran Martin's curator insight, September 10, 2013 12:37 AM

Great website by colleague Ian Cook at Exeter University

Mr Ortloff's curator insight, October 8, 2013 9:32 AM

Where did your T-Shirt come from?   Where did the food your parents bought at the grocery store come from?  What's the origin of the components in your cell phone?  These questions all allude to what geographers call a commodity chain analysis.  Analyzing where the consumer goods that we use every day came from can make global issues hit a little closer to home and reinforce concepts such as globalization. The website Follow the Things is a great resource for learning  about commodity chains and mapping out your own personal geographies.

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10 Things Most Americans Don't Know About America

10 Things Most Americans Don't Know About America | CLIL-DNL Geography | Scoop.it

"This is how I lovingly describe my current relationship with the United States. The United States is my alcoholic brother. And although I will always love him, I don’t want to be near him at the moment.  I know that's harsh, but I really feel my home country is not in good place these days.  That's not a socio-economic statement (although that's on the decline as well), but rather a cultural one."

moment. I know that’s harsh, but I really feel my home country is not in a good place these days. That’s not a socio-economic statement (although that’s on the decline as well), but rather a cultural one.
Read more at http://thoughtcatalog.com/2013/10-things-most-americans-dont-know-about-america/#rHCAX5i4WzLzZpxX.99


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, July 24, 2013 9:08 AM

While I am not endorsing all of the ideas presented, the author makes some thoughtful points about American culture that are worth considering. 

Kenneth Jordan's comment, September 3, 2013 7:57 PM
I feel that most Americans take for granted the freedoms and luxuries they have because they don't take the time to view life from a foreigner's point of view. We go through our daily lives not realizing how much easier our lives are than most people's around the world.
Kenneth Jordan's comment, September 3, 2013 8:01 PM
I believe that most Americans go through their day without realizing how much easier their lives are than those of people who live in different counties.
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The changing origins of U.S. immigrants

The changing origins of U.S. immigrants | CLIL-DNL Geography | Scoop.it
Back in 1992, most legal immigrants came from Latin America and Europe. Nowadays, they tend to come from Asia and Africa.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 5, 2013 3:04 PM

These statistics only include documented migrants although the number of undocumented migration (mostly from Latin America and the Caribbean) has declined since 2007. 


Tagsmigration.

Jodi Esaili's curator insight, June 6, 2013 9:57 AM

add your insight...

Steven Flis's curator insight, December 17, 2013 12:17 PM

From these statistics i dont think the biggest change is the latin american immigrant population but the european population. The european went from 13% to 8 % of the total make up of immigrant population. Thats a 60% decline, and that tells me that the attraction of living in America has diwendled while the EU market is on the rise. I think this is from the growing economies of the EU market and also the fact that the US has been improving in many of the leading statistics such as education, child care, and quality of life. 

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Bizarre Borders


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Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, January 30, 4:29 PM

Glad to see two countries like Canada and America can get along over these bizarre borders. I think many countries in the Middle East would fight over those small pieces of land. I think we avoid violence over these borders because we have such a good relationship with Canada.

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, February 1, 4:28 PM

The video highlights a bunch irregularities along the US/Canadian border. Among them, the zigzag 49th not-so-parallel, a small island which is actually a disputed territory, and another US island which is far closer to Canada than it is Washington state causing high school students to have to cross international borders four times to attend school.



This is an interesting video in that it shows how even in the recent past how difficult it was to clearly and conclusively delineate the border between the US and Canada. The fact that there is still a disputed island between two very friendly nations. This only makes it more clear why much older, less friendly nations would have heated disputes over territory.

 

Mrs. B's curator insight, February 15, 6:46 AM

Did you know the geometric boundary between US and Canada (the longest border in the world) is also a physical border? Check it out.

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American English Dialects

American English Dialects | CLIL-DNL Geography | Scoop.it

There are 8 major English dialect areas in North America, presented on the map. These are shown in blue, each with its number, on the map and in the Dialect Description Chart below, and are also outlined with blue lines on the map.  The many subdialects are shown in red on the map and in the chart, and are outlined with red lines on the map. All of these are listed in the margins of the map as well.


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Fotografie Turismo Italia's comment, May 17, 2013 2:07 AM
I don't know this problem, sorry.
Ms. Harrington's curator insight, May 22, 2013 9:16 AM

Very cool map with links to video/audio of the local dialect.

Leslie Creath's curator insight, May 27, 2013 10:41 AM

This is fascinating to me

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Stunning Satellite Images of Earth

Stunning Satellite Images of Earth | CLIL-DNL Geography | Scoop.it
Exclusive timelapse: See climate change, deforestation and urban sprawl unfold as Earth evolves over 30 years.

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Tracy Young's curator insight, May 12, 2013 3:12 PM

Very useful visual tool for exploring patterns of change

oyndrila's curator insight, May 17, 2013 10:24 AM

Exciting!!

Ishola Adebayo's comment, July 31, 2013 6:07 AM
good day Sir, pls need help on fixing scan line errors on lansat7 ETM images from 2003 using for example ArcMap9.3 or ENVI4.5 or.........thank you so much
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Britain's New Slogan: Don't Come to the U.K.!

Britain's New Slogan: Don't Come to the U.K.! | CLIL-DNL Geography | Scoop.it
An advertising campaign designed to illustrate the drawbacks of living in the U.K. is being planned to deter an expected surge of immigrants, according to reports

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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 28, 2013 2:19 PM

With the quota limiting the number of immigrants from bulgria and romania due to expire next year it will give 29 million people the right to not only enter but live and work in Britain. One plan is to force those arriving from Romiania and Bulgiaria to prove that they can support themselves for six months. They are also putting out an advertisment to try to show drawbacks to living in Britian to try and detur people from immigrating in.  

Maegan Connor's curator insight, December 17, 2013 3:07 PM

I find this idea very interesting that due to the economic struggles, a country would try to turn away prospective immigrants.  In a way, we see this with some people in America who try to play the card "the immigrants  take our jobs" but I have never seen it outside our lovely racist country. 

It is similar though, to something that Brazilian citizens have posted on websites saying "Don't come to Brazil" to draw attention to the fact that country is in shambles and if people come to the World Cup and Olympics, it will cause more internal problems for the struggling country. 

I understand the phrase and the reasoning behind it but I do not believe it is a solution to the economic problems.  There should be limits on immigration if a country truly cannot support the amount of people already living in it but people should not be deterred from immigrating to a place if there are still better opportunities there than where they came from.

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, March 29, 2:22 PM

It appears the U.K. is designing this campaign due to the fact they are struggling financially and they cannot afford to give benefits to some of the immigrants coming into the U.K., as immigrants are entering at a high rate.

When the Olympics games were hosted in London, the weather was beautiful and the sun was shining almost everyday, (which is rare in the U.K.) That made the U.K. even more attractive to foreigners and potential immigrants. This advertising campaign is displaying the drawbacks of living in the U.K., such as the rainy weather and constant grey skies.  

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Political Geography Now: World Cup 2014: Which Countries Are (and Aren't) Members of FIFA?

Political Geography Now: World Cup 2014: Which Countries Are (and Aren't) Members of FIFA? | CLIL-DNL Geography | Scoop.it
Your guide to which independent countries and territories are eligible for the World Cup, which are shut out, and which are in the finals this year. Includes 4 different maps!

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▶ A tour of the British Isles in accents - YouTube

Got the audio here - http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p01slnp5 The person doing the voice is Andrew Jack who is a dialect coach.
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The Growth of Megacities

The Growth of Megacities | CLIL-DNL Geography | Scoop.it

"For the first time in human history, more of the world’s 6.8 billion people live in cities than in rural areas. That is an incredible demographic and geographic shift since 1950 when only 30 percent of the world’s 2.5 billion inhabitants lived in urban environments.

 

The world’s largest cities, particularly in developing countries, are growing at phenomenal rates. As a growing landless class is attracted by urban opportunities, meager as they might be, these cities’ populations are ballooning to incredible numbers.

 

A May 2010 Christian Science Monitor article on “megacities” predicted that by 2050, almost 70 percent of the world’s estimated 10 billion people—more than the number of people living today—will reside in urban areas. The social, economic and environmental problems associated with a predominantly urbanized population are considerably different from those of the mostly rural world population of the past."


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Arya Okten's curator insight, March 27, 7:23 PM

Unit VII

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, April 28, 7:40 AM

unit 7

Whitney Souery's curator insight, May 28, 3:48 PM

The majority of megacities are in the developing world, with the exception of places like New York and Tokyo, best showing how the face of the world is changing. Developing countries are on their paths to becoming major powers, such as Calkutta for example. As an enlarging city, more and more citizens are flocking to the abundance of jobs in the city which thus increases India's development as a result of the growing city and thus leads to a cycle of growth as demand for more jobs increases as the city grows. Megacities are thus a symbol of the developing world and can be used in human geography as symbols of development. 

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Les effets du thatchérisme dans les villes du Nord de l’Angleterre - Métropolitiques

Les effets du thatchérisme dans les villes du Nord de l’Angleterre - Métropolitiques | CLIL-DNL Geography | Scoop.it
Les politiques économiques des gouvernements Thatcher ont polarisé aussi bien l'opinion que les territoires anglais. Les villes du Nord, bastion
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Tour the World - Official Music Video

Full album & lyrics: http://www.marblesthebrainstore.com/brain-beats-2 Music by Renald Francoeur, Drawing by Craighton Berman, Video by Don Markus "Tour the ...
Ann-Laure Liéval's insight:

pour réviser sa géo et les noms de pays en anglais

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Picture quiz – do you know your world cities?

Picture quiz – do you know your world cities? | CLIL-DNL Geography | Scoop.it
Some city skylines are so iconic they are instantly recognisable.

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harish magan's comment, September 10, 2013 4:09 AM
It is very interesting to explore new cities and their sky views
Victoria McNamara's curator insight, December 12, 2013 9:41 AM

After taking this quiz I realized I could not really identify most of these cities. I could tell some of them were European from the look of the buildings. I also thought a few more were cities in the United States but there was only Dallas. In my opinion these cities are even more spectacular than some of our major cities. 

Lorettayoung's curator insight, May 8, 5:36 PM

is this ularu ?

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Maps 101: Geography News Network

Maps 101: Geography News Network | CLIL-DNL Geography | Scoop.it

"Introducing Geography News Network. Global culture, science, history and political stories have become a key component of Maps101 through weekly stories and associated lesson plans. This year sees the addition of 5 brand new authors bringing engaging stories from a range of perspectives."


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 5, 2013 11:32 AM

I am delighted to announce that I will be one of the new authors that will be writing for Maps 101's newest educational platform: the Geography News Network.  Many schools and districts across the country have subscriptions to this online service that provides thousands of supplemental materials and lesson plans for geography, earth science, history and social studies teachers.  If your school district does not currently have a subscription, you can sign up for a free trial subscription.

Amélie Silvert's curator insight, September 5, 2013 1:08 PM

Geography into perspective.

Sandy Montoya's comment, September 8, 2013 9:38 AM
I believe it is very important for viewers to watch such channels. You get a chance to learn about other cultures around the world and relate them to themselves and the world around them. It is a great educational site.
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Is the U.S. Population Getting Older and More Diverse?, Alexa Jones-Puthoff, U.S. Census Bureau - Newsroom - U.S. Census Bureau

Is the U.S. Population Getting Older and More Diverse?, Alexa Jones-Puthoff, U.S. Census Bureau - Newsroom - U.S. Census Bureau | CLIL-DNL Geography | Scoop.it
Is the U.S. Population Getting Older and More Diverse?, Alexa Jones-Puthoff, U.S. Census Bureau
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The Health Toll of Immigration

The Health Toll of Immigration | CLIL-DNL Geography | Scoop.it
A growing body of mortality research on immigrants has shown that the longer they live in the United States, the worse their rates of heart disease, high blood pressure and diabetes.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 7, 2013 7:55 PM

This article highlights a fascinating cultural shift that impacts the migrants that come to the United States.  The second generation might have more money but they tend to live shorter lives than their parents.  As the next generation becomes integrated into American pop culture, unhealthy habits follow (smoking, drinking, high-calorie diets and sedentary lifestyles). 


Tags: migrationpopular culture, population, food, culture.

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Atlas of True Names

Atlas of True Names | CLIL-DNL Geography | Scoop.it

The Atlas of True Names reveals the etymological roots, or original meanings,
of the familiar terms on today's maps of the World, Europe, the British Isles and the United States.

For instance, where you would normally expect to see the Sahara indicated,
the Atlas gives you "The Tawny One", derived from Arab. es-sahra “the fawn coloured, desert”.


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John Blunnie's curator insight, July 2, 2013 8:12 AM

True names give these maps a unique and historic twist.

Carol Thomson's curator insight, July 17, 2013 1:57 AM

I loved looking at the map of great britain.  I hope it grabs my pupils' attention as an introduction to maps.

Amy Marques's curator insight, July 31, 2013 4:19 PM

Great to see what the original names where! Especially for those that are similar to its current name and those that are completely irrelevant!

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GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world!

GeoGuessr - Let's explore the world! | CLIL-DNL Geography | Scoop.it
GeoGuessr is a geography game which takes you on a journey around the world and challenges your ability to recognize your surroundings.

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Eric Raposo's curator insight, September 11, 2013 11:28 AM

Very inteesting to see if on could guess where places are :)

Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 11, 2013 11:29 AM

Challenging but very fun!

Maegan Connor's curator insight, September 11, 2013 12:06 PM

This is the next best alternative to exploring the world right now.

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Obama administration reiterates belief UK is stronger within EU

Obama administration reiterates belief UK is stronger within EU | CLIL-DNL Geography | Scoop.it
White House makes no attempt to conceal dismay at David Cameron's EU speech, as China and India also express concern
Ann-Laure Liéval's insight:

La réaction étasunienne mais aussi des géants asiatiques sur l'eventuel départ du Royaume Uni de l'UE. 

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