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Growing Green Awards: Healthy Food Coming to a Corner Store Near You

Growing Green Awards: Healthy Food Coming to a Corner Store Near You | Clearly Essential | Scoop.it
ONEARTH — Lack of access to affordable healthy food is a problem that plagues cities and towns across the country. In many of these communities, families depend on corner stores as a ...
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Eating Our Way Home: An Immigrant Family’s Journey For Sustainability By Aparajita Sengupta

Eating Our Way Home: An Immigrant Family’s Journey For Sustainability By Aparajita Sengupta | Clearly Essential | Scoop.it

 little over two years ago, we sold our house in Lexington, Kentucky to come back and settle in India. Me and my husband had spent seven and eleven years respectively in the United States and after years of confusion, vacillation, and endless planning, we finally decided to make the big move. Our compulsion to leave the United States was very strong, but our feelings were mixed. We had missed family and the surroundings familiar to us terribly the whole time we were in the United States, but so many years can hardly be just an interim—it is real time, and bound to be significant in certain ways. So what was supposed to be the time in which I got a degree also became a time when we fell in love, got married, learnt to drive and swim, traveled a lot, and had a daughter. We also became convinced that we eventually wanted to farm for a living. In other words, the time we spent in this country had somehow changed us fundamentally. Even as many personal reasons for wanting to come back remained, one overwhelming reason germinated during our years in the States, and gradually grew with time. This began as a concern for what we eat, and gradually invaded our sentiments regarding everything around us— society, environment, politics, the climate, and our status as immigrants. Primarily, it was our immersion in the politics of food that convinced us of the need to go back to India.

We had gone through a series of steps back in the States, little changes in attitude and action, that in the long run landed us emotionally and politically in a very different state of mind than what we had six or seven years ago. We started off as the average immigrant family, living in a rented apartment in the Southside of town, driving a Honda Civic, buying our groceries from Walmart or Kroger, shopping from retail chains like Macy’s, Dillard’s or Sears at the mall. We would also occasionally eat from fast food chains, but preferred not to because we did not like how their food tasted. In trying to revisit the exact trajectory of how we initially started questioning certain things, I think now that we also began with how things tasted. We usually found restaurant food to be lacking in flavor and taste, which we would ascribe to the differences of American food to tastes we were familiar with. But even produce bought from grocery retails and cooked at home with the familiar spices seemed quite different. The very subtle qualities in food that are hard to describe but easy to sense were missing from the food we cooked. I had also often always wondered about the size of produce. The biggest onion I had ever seen in India would still fit into the palm of my hand, and the biggest eggplant was about half the size of the ones I saw in groceries in the States. It took us a while to figure out that the size of the produce had nothing to do with the amount of naturally occurring nutrients in the soil of the United States, that most of the vegetables were genetically modified varieties, and that bigger vegetables could not be explained by simply saying that “Everything is big in America!”, a statement quite popular in immigrant circles awed by the size of things in the land of opportunity

 

 

 

http://www.countercurrents.org/sengupta040413.htm

 


Via Giri Kumar
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7 Natural Remedies for Children

7 Natural Remedies for Children | Clearly Essential | Scoop.it
Natural remedies for children I use on my own four kids quite often - from cod liver oil to essential oils to homemade balms, you can do it all yourself.

Via Stephanie Jo Rountree
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Farming, Foraging and Fracking: Our Fight Against the Machine

Farming, Foraging and Fracking: Our Fight Against the Machine | Clearly Essential | Scoop.it
Three years ago, my wife and I decided to redirect our farming efforts to create a CSA. Our farm is located in some of the most spectacularly beautiful scenery in the whole of this country.

 

 

http://www.resilience.org/stories/2013-03-26/farming-foraging-and-fracking-our-fight-against-the-machine

 


Via Giri Kumar
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Giri Kumar's curator insight, April 2, 2013 10:05 AM

Please visit this link for more interesting articles.

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How to Get Rid of Ants Naturally

How to Get Rid of Ants Naturally | Clearly Essential | Scoop.it

When ants invade your home, it's time to battle. You don't have to use ant baits with pesticide in the traps, however, since there are several natural solutions to getting rid of ants and keeping them out.

Keeping Ants at Bay

To discourage ants from coming inside your house, the baby powder trick may work as well because ants won't climb over the powder. There are other options that also involve scent or clever uses, a few of which we've mentioned before:

Put cucumber slices near cracks or entry points because ants apparently hate cucumbers.Draw chalk lines around your doorways and windowsills—as with the baby powder, this may work because ants don't like particles sticking to their feet.Put bay leaves or sprinkle cayenne pepper where the ants are coming in; according toPlanet Green, ants hate the scent of these.Make a cleaning solution of vinegar, water, and about ten drops of tea tree oil and spray it around your counters/doorways/etc. Also similar to the baby powder trick, this makes ants lose their scent trails and stop coming around (hopefully).

Regularly cleaning up in your kitchen, taking out the trash, and sealing door sills and window sills are also all good measures. Have any other ant control suggestions? Let's hear them in the comments.


Via Stephanie Jo Rountree, Britton Bell, Giri Kumar
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How to Make Your Own All-Natural Pesticide

How to Make Your Own All-Natural Pesticide | Clearly Essential | Scoop.it

This year, we planted a vegetable garden and have been in constant amazement at the miracle of life happening in our back yard. I was so enthralled with my first full-grown snow pea, that I had to take a picture of it to share with you. However, in addition to the life that is our plants, there is other not-as-welcome life: the inevitable garden pests. Critters with teeth have been nibbling and insects have added decorative holes to our greens.


Via Stephanie Jo Rountree
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