Climate & Clean Air Watch
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Climate & Clean Air Watch
The latest on what's happening to the climate and the issue of air pollution.
Curated by Bert Guevara
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10 economies hit hard by climate change ("philippines is number 1 in the list, then nigeria")

10 economies hit hard by climate change ("philippines is number 1 in the list, then nigeria") | Climate & Clean Air Watch | Scoop.it
CNBC looks at which countries may be worst hit, both environmentally and economically, by climate change.

U.S. President Barack Obama pushed climate change up the global agenda last month, with his offer of $4 billion in government loans for projects that avoid or reduce greenhouse gases.

This move and others reflect a growing acceptance in Washington, and around the world, that global warming exists and will hamper economic growth unless combated. The OECD, for instance, forecasts annual damages from climate change will knock 1.5-4.8 percent off the global economy by the end of the century.

The economic hit will not be equal across countries however. Floods, typhoons, droughts and landslides all take a heavier toll on poorer countries with fewer infrastructures to cope, and where the majority of the populace still work on the land.

With that in mind, click below to see which places could be worst affected by climate change—both environmentally and economically.

Bert Guevara's insight:

"The Philippines leads the World Bank's list of nations most in danger of facing more frequent and intense storms hitting its 7,000 islands.

"In the last five years, the country has experienced several typhoons that have resulted in severe damage and losses. Some have hit new areas such as Mindanao, which historically have not been affected."

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Business and Climate: A Match Made In Paris ("barrier of distrust must be replaced by cooperation")

Business and Climate: A Match Made In Paris ("barrier of distrust must be replaced by cooperation") | Climate & Clean Air Watch | Scoop.it
The United Nations Climate Change Conference, also known as COP21, begins later this month in Paris. There, as Newsweek put it, "leaders and high-level officials from 196 parties have 12 days to reach an accord that could save the planet." That's not an exaggeration. The stakes are huge and we're not going to have many opportunities, with everyone gathered together, to come up with a solution equal to the problem. And the business world is going to have to be a part of that solution. So I'm delighted that Michael Bloomberg, whose commitment to working toward solutions to this crisis is inspiring, has asked me to share my own thoughts on the subject as part of "Businesses for Climate," a series on how businesses are addressing climate change leading up to the conference.

Many companies around the world are already taking action. In the last year, for example, the number of companies committing to weaning themselves off fossil fuels -- by creating real financial targets, not just making empty promises -- has tripled. Half of all new power plants built in 2014 were green. Companies from Starbucks and Walmart to Nike and Salesforce have pledged to reduce emissions and vastly increase their use of renewable energy. Even big banks are taking a stand, reducing lending to coal-mining companies.

As Secretary of State John Kerry said, the kind of binding agreement that is the goal of COP21 "will give confidence to business leaders who are uncertain about our collective commitment and hesitant to invest in low-carbon alternatives that we need because of that perceived hesitancy by governments."

One global leader in addressing climate change is Unilever, which has pledged to reduce the company's environmental footprint by 50 percent by 2020. Under the leadership of CEO Paul Polman, Unilever -- which includes hundreds of recognizable brands, including Ben & Jerry's, Dove, and Lipton -- has launched a global Sustainable Living Plan, which aims simultaneously increase the company's impact and its profits. Polman believes that businesses can help solve the world's biggest problems, but as he put it, these problems "cannot be solved just by quarterly reporting. They require longer-term solutions and not 90-day pressures."

Bert Guevara's insight:

Instead of playing villain, business is playing role of hero - many of them, at least.


"Many companies around the world are already taking action. In the last year, for example, the number of companies committing to weaning themselves off fossil fuels -- by creating real financial targets, not just making empty promises -- has tripled. Half of all new power plants built in 2014 were green. Companies from Starbucks and Walmart to Nike and Salesforce have pledged to reduce emissions and vastly increase their use of renewable energy. Even big banks are taking a stand, reducing lending to coal-mining companies."

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Solar Prices Could Be 10% Less Than Coal In India By 2020 ("long-term coal reliance has flawed basis")

Solar Prices Could Be 10% Less Than Coal In India By 2020 ("long-term coal reliance has flawed basis") | Climate & Clean Air Watch | Scoop.it
KPMG has released a report stating that by 2020 solar power in India could cost about 10% less than coal power, saying

KPMG has released a report stating that by 2020 solar power in India could cost about 10% less than coal power, saying “Solar power price declines have beaten the expectations of most analysts since the beginning of 2015. In the ongoing NTPC solar park tender, solar prices have breached the INR 5/kwh and this is a landmark for the energy sector. Today, in India, solar prices are within 15% of power prices on a levelized basis. Our forecast is that by 2020, solar power prices could be up to 10% lower than coal power prices.”

2020 is not that far away, and if it does come to pass that solar power is cheaper than electricity generated by coal in just a handful of years in such a huge country that consumes tremendous quantities of the stuff, it certainly would be quite a milestone.

“We need to re-engineer our process to create energy efficiency and conservation to give India an affordable energy access. A holistic vision is the need of the hour in order to reach 200 million people at a faster rate. I am personally convinced that any amount of investment in this sector will have a quick pay back,” explained energy minister Piyush Goyal.

We’ve already seen that solar power in Chile can be cheaper than electricity produced by coal. Who is paying attention to these developments though? Critics and cynics could say that Chile is a nation of only 17 million with exceptional solar power potential, and therefore is not indicative of a larger solar power trend.


Bert Guevara's insight:

Things have changed on the energy front, so why are our leaders still putting their bets on coal?


"It doesn’t seem that long ago that naysayers were saying grid parity wasn’t possible with renewables – especially for solar power. Now, it seems we are moving towards a reality where solar power could be cheaper than coal power, in some cases."

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T@T lab's curator insight, March 25, 4:28 AM

Things have changed on the energy front, so why are our leaders still putting their bets on coal?

 

"It doesn’t seem that long ago that naysayers were saying grid parity wasn’t possible with renewables – especially for solar power. Now, it seems we are moving towards a reality where solar power could be cheaper than coal power, in some cases."

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In Turning Point, Carbon Emissions Fall Among G20 ("a glimmer of hope for planet to avert disaster")

In Turning Point, Carbon Emissions Fall Among G20 ("a glimmer of hope for planet to avert disaster") | Climate & Clean Air Watch | Scoop.it
Greenhouse gas emissions per capita are falling in 11 of the Group of 20 major economies

Greenhouse gas emissions per capita are falling in 11 of the Group of 20 major economies, a turning point for tackling climate change, a study showed.

The report, by a new organization of scientists and other experts called Climate Transparency, also said 15 of the G20 members has seen strong growth in renewable energy in recent years.

"Climate action by the G20 has reached a turning point, with per capita emissions falling in 11 members, and renewable energy growing strongly," the group said in a statement. The G20 accounts for about three-quarters of world greenhouse gases.

It said G20 members "must all urgently decarbonize their economies" to meet a U.N. goal to limit average temperature rises to 2 degrees Celsius (3.6 Fahrenheit) above pre-industrial levels to limit heat waves, floods and rising seas.

The report said the trend in per capita carbon emissions over the five years to 2012 was down in Australia, the United States, Canada, Japan, Germany, Britain, the European Union, South Africa, Italy, France and Mexico.

Per capita emissions were still rising in the most populous G20 nations, China and India. They were also up in Saudi Arabia, South Korea, Russia, Argentina, Turkey, Brazil and Indonesia.

Still, that marked a shift in long-term trends. Over the past quarter century, G20 carbon dioxide emissions had risen by almost 50 percent while per capita emissions had gained by about 18 percent, reflecting population growth, it said.

Alvaro Umana, a former Costa Rican environment minister and co-chair of Climate Transparency, said greater G20 cooperation on climate change was a "diplomatic landmark" after years of divisions between developing and developed nations on the issue.

Bert Guevara's insight:

The major carbon emitters are showing signs of positive action in favor of the climate. More needs to be done to sustain the momentum.


"The report said the trend in per capita carbon emissions over the five years to 2012 was down in Australia, the United States, Canada, Japan, Germany, Britain, the European Union, South Africa, Italy, France and Mexico."

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UN Report Raises Ceiling for Greenhouse Gas Pollution ("

UN Report Raises Ceiling for Greenhouse Gas Pollution (" | Climate & Clean Air Watch | Scoop.it
The U.N.'s environmental authority has quietly raised its assessment of the level at which global greenhouse gas emissions must peak to avoid dangerous climate change, as governments seek a new accord to fight global warming. In its first four annual emissions reports in 2010-2013, the...

The U.N.'s environmental authority has quietly raised its assessment of the level at which global greenhouse gas emissions must peak to avoid dangerous climate change, as governments seek a new accord to fight global warming.

In its first four annual emissions reports in 2010-2013, the United Nations Environment Program said emissions must not exceed 44 billion tons in 2020 for the world to limit global warming to 2 degrees C (3.6 degrees F).

But with real-world emissions rising far beyond that level, UNEP has since last year downplayed its focus on 2020 as a make-or-break year for emissions reductions.

In this year's Emissions Gap report, a summary of which was released Friday, UNEP says the world can still reach the 2-degree target with emissions of 52 billion tons by 2020, which is just slightly below today's level.

The new analysis assumes that emissions cuts will drop faster after 2030 than was assumed in previous reports.

UNEP chief scientist Jacqueline McGlade told The Associated Press the earlier assessments weren't wrong, but were based on emissions scenarios that are "no longer realistic."

Critics said the change reflects political pressure to show the 2-degree goal is still feasible as governments work on the U.N. climate agreement that's supposed to be adopted in Paris next month.

Bert Guevara's insight:

What's the difference between 44 billion tons and 54 billion tons by 2020? -- time! Do we really have the luxury of delaying decisive action?


"In this year's Emissions Gap report, a summary of which was released Friday, UNEP says the world can still reach the 2-degree target with emissions of 52 billion tons by 2020, which is just slightly below today's level."

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UN weather body: Antarctic ozone hole expands due to cold ("danger remains even as ozone recovers")

UN weather body: Antarctic ozone hole expands due to cold ("danger remains even as ozone recovers") | Climate & Clean Air Watch | Scoop.it
GENEVA -- The Antarctic ozone hole has swelled this month to one of its biggest sizes on record, UN and US scientists said, insisting that the Earth-shielding ozone layer remains on track to long-term recovery but residents of the southern hemisphere should be on watch for high UV levels in the weeks ahead. The World Meteorological Organization, in a regular bulletin released Thursday, said the Antarctic ozone hole often faces seasonal and year-to-year variations, but said the expansion this year shows "we need to remain vigilant."

The Antarctic ozone hole has swelled this month to one of its biggest sizes on record, UN and US scientists said, insisting that the Earth-shielding ozone layer remains on track to long-term recovery but residents of the southern hemisphere should be on watch for high UV levels in the weeks ahead.

The World Meteorological Organization, in a regular bulletin released Thursday, said the Antarctic ozone hole often faces seasonal and year-to-year variations, but said the expansion this year shows "we need to remain vigilant."

The Geneva-based UN agency pointed to NASA data on October 2 showing the hole had reached 28.2 million square kilometers (10.9 million square miles) — larger than the size of Russia and Canada put together. It was the largest recorded on that date, and the hole has remained at a record size on the dates since, WMO said.

According to NASA, the record largest ozone hole dates to September 9, 2000, when it was 29.9 million square kilometers.

 

Paul Newman, chief scientist for earth sciences at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, said prolonged wintertime conditions in the Antarctic region were persisting longer than usual, and that unusually weak vertical energy flows were among major contributors to the exceptionally large hole.

The stratospheric ozone layer, which sits some 25 kilometers (18 miles) high and protects against harmful UV rays, is different from the ground level ozone that is a harmful pollutant. The ozone layer had been thinning since the late 1970s because man-made chlorofluorocarbons often used as refrigerants and aerosol cans released chlorine and bromine that destroyed ozone molecules high in the air.

Bert Guevara's insight:

"We are suffering now from the sins of the past."


"There is no need for undue alarm because we are on a course to recovery, but we have not observed it yet," said WMO scientist Geir Braathen, who wrote the bulletin. "CFCs (chlorofluorocarbons), they have a long life in the atmosphere ... many, many decades. It takes a long time for these molecules to get out of the atmosphere."

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Indonesia's fires labelled a 'crime against humanity' as 500,000 suffer ("the damage is staggering")

Indonesia's fires labelled a 'crime against humanity' as 500,000 suffer ("the damage is staggering") | Climate & Clean Air Watch | Scoop.it
Haze has caused havoc, with schools in neighbouring Singapore and Malaysia shut down, flights grounded and events cancelled

Raging forest fires across Indonesia are thought to be responsible for up to half a million cases of respiratory infections, with the resultant haze covering parts of Malaysia and Singapore now being described as a “crime against humanity”.

Tens of thousands of hectares of forest have been alight for more than two months as a result of slash and burn – the fastest and quickest way to clear land for new plantations.

Indonesia is the world’s largest producer of palm oil and fires are frequently intentionally lit to clear the land with the resulting haze an annual headache.

But this year a prolonged dry season and the impact of El Niño have made the situation far worse, with one estimate that daily emissions from the fires havesurpassed the average daily emissions of the entire US economy.

The fires have caused the air to turn a toxic sepia colour in the worst hit areas of Sumatra and Kalimantan, where levels of the Pollutant Standard Index (PSI) have pushed toward 2,000. Anything above 300 is considered hazardous.

Endangered wildlife such as orangutans have also been forced to flee the forests because of the fires.

Six Indonesian provinces have declared a state of emergency.

Across the region Indonesia’s haze crisis has been causing havoc – schools in neighbouring Singapore and Malaysia have been shut down, flights have been grounded, events cancelled and Indonesian products boycotted, as millions try to avoid the intense smoke.

In the worst affected parts, on Sumatra and Kalimantan, ten people have died from haze-related illnesses and more than 500,000 cases of acute respiratory tract infections have been reported since July 1.

Bert Guevara's insight:

“Large parts of Indonesia have now been in a state of emergency for over a month. Why has there not been a nationally declared total fire ban advertised 24/7 on all television channels?” asked Dr. Eric Meijaard, an Indonesia-based associate professor at the University of Queensland, in a recent editorial in the Jakarta Globe.

“Why has there not been a clear message: you burn — you go to jail?”

By its own calculation the fires have cost the Indonesian government more than US$30 billion, a huge blow for the country’s floundering economy and the president’s economic development agenda.

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The Northern Hemisphere Just Set a Cyclone Record | WXshift ("the new normal is turning for the worse")

The Northern Hemisphere Just Set a Cyclone Record | WXshift ("the new normal is turning for the worse") | Climate & Clean Air Watch | Scoop.it
The northern hemisphere set a record for Category 4 storms this year and there's still more than two months left for more to form.

The northern hemisphere has been going gangbusters with cyclones this year and now it’s set a record.

With typhoons Champi and Koppu reaching Category 4 status, the hemisphere has now had 20 cyclones — the generic name for hurricanes and typhoons — reach that intensity or greater. That breaks the previous record for the highest number of Category 4 storms in a year. And there’s still two months left to put more distance between this year’s record and 2004, the old record holder.

El Niño is one of the main culprits that has changed circulation patterns in the tropical Pacific and created a warm stretch of water for cyclones to feed on in that basin (even though it’s also tamped down activity in the Atlantic).

“In general, it's not that you necessarily get more storms in El Nino years in the Pacific, it's just that they form closer to the International Date Line and consequently take long tracks across the very warm waters of the Pacific Ocean,” Phil Klotzbach, a hurricane expert at Colorado State University, said.

Global warming has also raised ocean temperatures to record levels, though that trend hasn’t specifically been tied to this year’s record for major cyclone activity. Klotzbach also said “The Blob” — a patch of record-warm water that has sat off the West Coast for the past couple of years — has played a notable role by cranking up ocean temperatures around Hawaii. The island chain saw a spate of hurricanes dance around it this summer and Hurricane Olaf is currently spinning to the southeast of Hawaii. The storm could reach Category 4 status by Tuesday, though it’s likely to weaken shortly thereafter and pose a minimal threat to Hawaii.

Bert Guevara's insight:

The Philippines is in the gateway of most typhoons from the Pacific Ocean area. 2015 is turning out to be a record year of typhoons.

 

"Most of this year’s activity has been in the western Pacific. That’s generally the most active cyclone region in the world, but this year has seen it operating on a different level. There have been 12 typhoons that have reached Category 4 or greater status. That includes recent addition in Koppu, which deluged the Philippines this weekend, and Champi, which could graze Iwo Jima later this week."

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UN lauds disaster preparedness | The Manila Times Online ("disaster reduction practice makes perfect")

UN lauds disaster preparedness | The Manila Times Online ("disaster reduction practice makes perfect") | Climate & Clean Air Watch | Scoop.it

The United Nations on Tuesday lauded the Philippine government’s preparedness for
Typhoon Lando (international name: Koppu) that minimized the number of both casualties and affected communities compared to past typhoons that befell the country.

Although the United Nations Children’s Fund (Unicef) expressed concern for children stranded in remote areas, the disaster risk reduction arm of the international organization credited the Philippine government’s preparedness program for minimizing the typhoon’s damage to life and property.

A statement from the Unicef and the UN Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR) said the country’s preparedness strategy “paid off.”

“The communication of early warnings in the Philippines has improved significantly since Typhoon Haiyan [Yolanda] claimed over 6,000 lives in November 2013. Last December, major loss of life was averted by large-scale evacuations in the face of Typhoon Hagupit,” Margareta Wahlstrom, head of the UNISDR, said.

This weekend, as Lando ravaged parts of northeastern Luzon, Wahlstrom noted that government agencies have been “successful” in reducing loss of life “ through the effective communication of early warnings and organizing targeted evacuations in the areas most affected by Typhoon Koppu.”

As a storm-prone country, the Philippines could share its expertise in disaster risk management with other countries trying to implement the Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction that was adopted in March this year “as a global blueprint for reducing disaster losses.”

Bert Guevara's insight:

Kudos to the unsung heroes!!!

 

"Although the United Nations Children’s Fund (Unicef) expressed concern for children stranded in remote areas, the disaster risk reduction arm of the international organization credited the Philippine government’s preparedness program for minimizing the typhoon’s damage to life and property.

"A statement from the Unicef and the UN Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNISDR) said the country’s preparedness strategy “paid off.”

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60+ Companies Going All-In on Climate #GoParis ("good to have them on the side of the planet")

60+ Companies Going All-In on Climate #GoParis ("good to have them on the side of the planet") | Climate & Clean Air Watch | Scoop.it
This week we're tipping our hats to the climate trailblazers: the leaders of the pack who aren't waiting for government to mandate climate action.

“This year is such a big year on climate change,” Emily Farnworth of the Climate Group, who oversees the RE100 renewable energy program, told TriplePundit during Climate Week NYC 2015. “There are a lot of businesses that want to make bold commitments to demonstrate — ahead of the negotiations in Paris — that businesses are actually very serious about tackling climate change.”

A lot of businesses, indeed. Over the past few months, we’ve seen dozens of multinational conglomerates and mid-sized companies roll out bold commitments to tackle climate change. And, as the historic COP21 climate talks in Paris approach, we’re likely to see a whole lot more in the way of corporate action.

But this week we’re tipping our hats to the climate trailblazers: the leaders of the pack who aren’t waiting for government to mandate climate action, but are making moves now to mitigate risk in their supply chains and help ensure a stable planet today and into the future.

Nine Fortune 500s pledge to go 100 percent renewable …

During Climate Week, nine top firms — Goldman Sachs, Johnson & Johnson, Nike, Procter & Gamble, Salesforce, Starbucks, Steelcase, Voya Financial, and Walmart — joined theRE100 initiative, pledging to work toward 100 percent renewables.

Bert Guevara's insight:

All climate mitigation efforts are welcome, at this point, as world leaders are still undecided. I hope their message reaches the right people.


“This year is such a big year on climate change,” Emily Farnworth of the Climate Group, who oversees the RE100 renewable energy program, told TriplePundit during Climate Week NYC 2015. “There are a lot of businesses that want to make bold commitments to demonstrate — ahead of the negotiations in Paris — that businesses are actually very serious about tackling climate change.”

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Alaska mulls extra oil drilling to cope with climate change - BBC News ("get the science straight!!")

Alaska mulls extra oil drilling to cope with climate change - BBC News ("get the science straight!!") | Climate & Clean Air Watch | Scoop.it
The Governor of Alaska tells the BBC that expanding the state's search for oil is necessary to pay for the damage caused by climate change.

Expanding the search for oil is necessary to pay for the damage caused by climate change, the Governor of Alaska has told the BBC.

The state is suffering significant climate impacts from rising seas forcing the relocation of remote villages.

Governor Bill Walker says that coping with these changes is hugely expensive.

He wants to "urgently" drill in the protected lands of the Arctic National Wilderness Refuge to fund them.

Alaska has been severely hit by the dramatic drop in the price of oil over the past two years.

The state is the only one in the US that doesn't have an income or sales tax, getting 90% of its day-to-day expenditure from levies on the production of oil and gas.

But the halving in the price of crude over the past year has seen Alaska's financial health deteriorate.

The recent decision by Shell to pull out of drillingin the Chukchi sea off the state's north coast has compounded the problem.

If Shell had found oil, it would have been a major boost for the the huge Trans Alaskan Pipeline that transports oil from the northern production fields to the tanker terminal in Valdez some 1,300km to the south.

Built to carry 2 million barrels a day, it's running at about 25% of its capacity as existing oil field production declines.

While Alaska's income from the oil continues to fall, expenditure on climate related activities is likely to go up. Coastal erosion is threatening a number of native communities in remote areas such as Kivalina.

Bert Guevara's insight:

Climate change mitigation is not all about more money at any cost. This governor has to get his science facts in order.

 

The governor argues that a small part of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge should be drilled to boost Alaska's revenues.

"This isn't something we can put off for 10-20 years... We have to begin this process now - it's an absolute urgency for Alaska."

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Philippines losing P300 B to disasters yearly - NewsHub ("that's about 10% of the country's annual budget!")

Philippines losing P300 B to disasters yearly - NewsHub ("that's about 10% of the country's annual budget!") | Climate & Clean Air Watch | Scoop.it
MANILA, Philippines – Losing more than P300 billion from natural disasters and calamities every year, the Philippines is at the forefront of a new global cooperation seeking to reduce financial vulnerabilities to natural catastrophes.

Finance Secretary Cesar Purisima leads 19 other nations in Lima, Peru this week in the establishment and inaugural meeting of the “Vulnerable 20” (V20) finance ministers group, according to the Department of Finance (DOF).

“There’s simply no debate about it. Its devastating effects reach deeply, jeopardizing sustainable economic growth, threatening food security and worsening the quality of life in many climate-vulnerable countries. What is even more unfortunate is that least developed, low-income, and middle-income countries that contribute the least to climate change are the ones that suffer the most from its adverse effects.”

Climate vulnerable nations suffer economic losses amounting to 2.5 percent of their gross domestic product (GDP) every year, according to estimates from the DOF.

With P12 trillion in nominal GDP by end 2014, 2.5 percent translates to more than P300 billion every year in the Philippines.

For context, P300 billion accounts for a tenth of next year’s proposed P3.002-trillion national budget.

The Philippines is prone to natural disasters like earthquakes and volcanic eruptions.

“The losses are expected to escalate if no significant action against climate change is implemented,” the DOF said.

The V20 group is looking at crafting an “action plan” to outline efforts to be taken to mitigate the impact of climate change, particularly through the mobilization of funds.

Bert Guevara's insight:

The cost of being a climate disaster vulnerable country.


“There’s simply no debate about it. Its devastating effects reach deeply, jeopardizing sustainable economic growth, threatening food security and worsening the quality of life in many climate-vulnerable countries. What is even more unfortunate is that least developed, low-income, and middle-income countries that contribute the least to climate change are the ones that suffer the most from its adverse effects.”

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Ten Clear Indicators Our Climate is Changing | Climate Reality

Ten Clear Indicators Our Climate is Changing | Climate Reality | Climate & Clean Air Watch | Scoop.it

So to help set the record straight, we’re going to focus on10 major changes scientists have seen in our climate system. Each indicator described below has been extensively studied over the past several decades, and was captured from many different data sets and technologies.

1. AIR TEMPERATURES OVER LAND ARE INCREASING.

 

2. AIR TEMPERATURES OVER OCEANS ARE INCREASING.

 

3. ARCTIC SEA ICE IS DECREASING.

 

4. GLACIERS ARE MELTING.

 

5. SEA LEVELS ARE RISING. 

 

6. HUMIDITY (EVERYONE’S FAVORITE) IS INCREASING

 

7. OCEAN HEAT CONTENT IS INCREASING. 

 

8. SEA SURFACE TEMPERATURE IS INCREASING.  

 

9. SNOW IS DECREASING. 

 

10. EARTH’S LOWER ATMOSPHERE TEMPERATURE IS INCREASING.

Bert Guevara's insight:

"It’s difficult to argue against what’s happening once you’ve seen these ten climate change indicators. That’s why it’s up to each and everyone one of us to do our part and help spread truthful information about climate change to our networks of friends, peers, and family."

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Solving Climate Change One Busted Fridge at a Time ("the battle goes on as the ozone problem remains")

Solving Climate Change One Busted Fridge at a Time ("the battle goes on as the ozone problem remains") | Climate & Clean Air Watch | Scoop.it
San Francisco-based company EOS Climate wants to change the way the world looks at the refrigerant market -- and, in the process, reduce global warming.

Ninety-five countries have now submitted proposals to amend the1987 Montreal Protocol to phase down production of hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs), which are used globally in refrigeration and air conditioning, insulation, aerosols, solvents, and fire suppression. These gases were originally developed to replace chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), because they don’t deplete the ozone layer.

However, HFCs are harmful in their own way: They, like all fluorinated gases including CFCs, are potent greenhouse gases — from 500 to 11,000 times as harmful to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide by some measurements.  Proposals for winding down their production and use range from regulatory changes to financial compensation, all with long timetables and lengthy lists of expenditures aimed at cushioning the financial and material impact of an essential phase-down.

California’s innovative global warming bill helped launch the company’s endeavors beyond the state’s borders, Cohen noted.

“As part of the California cap-and-trade program, we have done projects all over the country where we recover CFC refrigerants from older equipment from refrigerators to large commercial or industrial chillers that are still in use,” Cohen said.
The direct emissions reductions resulting from those projects amount to somewhere in the neighborhood of 5 million tons of CO2 equivalent. “And that is EOS’ projects. If you add in projects that other project developers have done using the methodology that we originated, it is probably double that,” Cohen continued. “In real-world terms, that is like preventing the emissions from the entire city of Los Angeles for a year.”

Bert Guevara's insight:

We cannot let our guard down on CFC's. Although progress has been achieved, the ozone problem has been barely solved. The ozone hole is still a big hole!


"However, HFCs are harmful in their own way: They, like all fluorinated gases including CFCs, are potent greenhouse gases — from 500 to 11,000 times as harmful to the atmosphere as carbon dioxide by some measurements.  Proposals for winding down their production and use range from regulatory changes to financial compensation, all with long timetables and lengthy lists of expenditures aimed at cushioning the financial and material impact of an essential phase-down."

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Magnet Motor Free Energy - Truly Green Energy From Perpetual Motion Induced by Magnets ("game changer?")

http://www.MEGenerator.com Power Innovator is one program which would allow people to power any kind of household appliances and will teach them how to make ...

Power Innovator is one program which would allow people to power any kind of household appliances and will teach them how to make this little device work for their home, considered to be one of its best features. Another great feature is that it will allow people to take this little device anywhere with them. It lets people save at least 80% on electricity, explains the hype encircling this product. But hype aside, this program would never go wrong as the idea was in reality conceived by Nicola Tesla who happens to be a famous scientist and inventor many decades ago. Power Innovator is one system which does not bring forth levels of baulks for people as it is the most simple and easy to follow program to impinge on the market in recent times. 

Prof. Richard Goran wants to spread the message that it's absolutely simple and easy to make your own electricity from scratch. The program not only saves people's money and time but it will also reduce their electricity bills starting today by at least 80%. This easy to follow course is available in digital format and it comes with a whole slew of training video modules that people can watch or download as many times as they like. These instructional videos have been tagged highly useful by people worldwide. In addition, numerous online evaluations affirm that Power Innovator is one genuine and legal system which works well for everyone out there.

Bert Guevara's insight:

Perpetual motion for renewable energy? I believe this!
In fact, there are some local inventors working on this presently.

 

"Power Innovator is one program which would allow people to power any kind of household appliances and will teach them how to make this little device work for their home, considered to be one of its best features. Another great feature is that it will allow people to take this little device anywhere with them. It lets people save at least 80% on electricity, explains the hype encircling this product. But hype aside, this program would never go wrong as the idea was in reality conceived by Nicola Tesla who happens to be a famous scientist and inventor many decades ago. Power Innovator is one system which does not bring forth levels of baulks for people as it is the most simple and easy to follow program to impinge on the market in recent times."

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T@T lab's curator insight, March 25, 4:28 AM

Perpetual motion for renewable energy? I believe this!
In fact, there are some local inventors working on this presently.

 

"Power Innovator is one program which would allow people to power any kind of household appliances and will teach them how to make this little device work for their home, considered to be one of its best features. Another great feature is that it will allow people to take this little device anywhere with them. It lets people save at least 80% on electricity, explains the hype encircling this product. But hype aside, this program would never go wrong as the idea was in reality conceived by Nicola Tesla who happens to be a famous scientist and inventor many decades ago. Power Innovator is one system which does not bring forth levels of baulks for people as it is the most simple and easy to follow program to impinge on the market in recent times."

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One Graph Shows El Niño’s New Record ("yes, it is confirmed that this el niño is worse than the last")

One Graph Shows El Niño’s New Record ("yes, it is confirmed that this el niño is worse than the last") | Climate & Clean Air Watch | Scoop.it
El Niño hit a weekly temperature record and is likely to keep upping the heat globally.

Weekly data published by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shows that the region of the Pacific generally used to gauge El Niño’s strength has officially surpassed the 1997-98 super El Niño in terms of warmth.

The hot waters in the Pacific are helping drive up temperatures globally as well as affect the world’s weather. This year has been on the fast track to the hottest year on record and the new Niño heat is only likely to crank the heat up even further.

The region in question, called the Nino 3.4 region, is now running an unheard of 5.4°F (3°C) above normal. That tops the previous weekly record of 5°F (2.8°C) set by the 1997-98 event. It remains to be seen if this is the peak and if so, how long it lasts.

Regardless, the impacts of El Niño are being felt in some part of the globe. Indonesia’s fires, heavy precipitation in the southern tier of the U.S., and record warmth around the globe are all telltale signs of how El Niño usually influences weather.

In the U.S., the winter outlook also further shows El Niño is likely to continue exerting its influence with the increased likelihood of cool, unsettled weather from the Southwest to the Southeast and warm conditions in the northern portion of the country.

While everybody loves a good record, it’s worth keeping any debate about the strongest El Niño on record in perspective. The Nino 3.4 region is an important one to monitor in terms of global impacts, but it’s only one of a handful of regions scientists monitor to assess El Niño’s strength and characteristics. Areas off the coast of Peru and the far eastern Pacific were warmer during the 1997-98 El Niño. It also remains to be seen if this year’s event will set an all-time monthly or seasonal record, which would bolster its case for strongest, biggest or whatever-ist on record.


Bert Guevara's insight:

This is not a simple case of hiding in air-conditioned rooms. The impacts of El Niño will not spare you.


"Weekly data published by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration shows that the region of the Pacific generally used to gauge El Niño’s strength has officially surpassed the 1997-98 super El Niño in terms of warmth."

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As CO2 Passes 400 PPM, What Goes Up Might Not Come Down ("the 350 benchmark will be harder to reach")

As CO2 Passes 400 PPM, What Goes Up Might Not Come Down ("the 350 benchmark will be harder to reach") | Climate & Clean Air Watch | Scoop.it
Carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere once again exceeded 400 parts per million Monday, but this time they may never fall back down, according to scientists.

Carbon dioxide concentrations in the atmosphere once again exceeded 400 parts per million Monday, but this time they may never fall back down, according to scientists.

While not a tipping point that signals climate catastrophe, the 400 ppm mark is an important symbolic threshold in the fight against climate change. It represents a 43 percent jump in greenhouse gases since pre-industrial times and underscores governments' inaction and worsening global warming impacts. 

Scientists at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii, the world's longest-running CO2 monitoring station, predicted in October that because of extra warming from El Nino, 2015 could be the last year CO2 concentrations in the Northern Hemisphere stay in the 300 ppm range. They strengthened that prediction on Monday after a routine calibration of data raised measurements taken since April by 0.4 ppm. "The adjustment increases the likelihood that [CO2] concentrations will remain above 400 ppm permanently after 2015," they wrote.

Bert Guevara's insight:

Not all that go up will come down. This may be true for carbon emissions.


"Scientists at the Mauna Loa Observatory in Hawaii, the world's longest-running CO2 monitoring station, predicted in October that because of extra warming from El Nino, 2015 could be the last year CO2 concentrations in the Northern Hemisphere stay in the 300 ppm range. They strengthened that prediction on Monday after a routine calibration of data raised measurements taken since April by 0.4 ppm. "The adjustment increases the likelihood that [CO2] concentrations will remain above 400 ppm permanently after 2015," they wrote."

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Warming set to breach 1C threshold - BBC News ("after 1 deg, what will stop it from hitting 2 deg?")

Warming set to breach 1C threshold - BBC News ("after 1 deg, what will stop it from hitting 2 deg?") | Climate & Clean Air Watch | Scoop.it
Global temperatures are set to rise more than 1C above pre-industrial levels in 2015, according to the UK's Met Office.

In 2013, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change reported that the combined land and ocean temperature showed warming of 0.85C between 1880 and 2012.

They also noted that the difference in the average temperatures from the 1850 to 1900 period was 0.78C when compared to the average between 2003 and 2012.

In other climate-related developments:

The World Meteorological Organization - the UN's weather agency - says levels of carbon dioxide and methane, two key greenhouse gases, reached record highs last yearA World Bank report says that 62 million more people in South Asia could fall into extreme poverty by 2030 as a result of lower crop yields and higher food prices, and the health impacts of climate change.

Since 2013, warming of the oceans and land surfaces has reached new heights. The year 2014 went down as the warmest year since records began, but it is likely that 2015 will go beyond that level. Scientists believe that 2016 is also shaping up as a very warm year and they expect that the one degree margin will become more firmly established in the coming years.

"This year marks an important first but that doesn't necessarily mean every year from now on will be a degree or more above pre-industrial levels, as natural variability will still play a role in determining the temperature in any given year," said Peter Stott, head of climate monitoring and attribution, at the Met Office.

"As the world continues to warm in the coming decades, however, we will see more and more years passing the one degree marker - eventually it will become the norm."

Bert Guevara's insight:

We have experienced how much has changed with a 1-deg C increase in global temperature. Can you imagine a 2-deg C increase? The world cannot afford to wait to act until it happens.

If we can't stop the 1-deg C increase, what makes you think we can stop the 2-deg C increase that easily?

 

"Many island states disagree with the two degree goal and want the UN to adopt a lower threshold of 1.5C.

"A UN analysis of the carbon cutting plans put forward by nations ahead of the Paris meeting concluded that, taken together, they would lead to warming of 2.7C above pre-industrial levels.

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T@T lab's curator insight, March 25, 4:29 AM

We have experienced how much has changed with a 1-deg C increase in global temperature. Can you imagine a 2-deg C increase? The world cannot afford to wait to act until it happens.

If we can't stop the 1-deg C increase, what makes you think we can stop the 2-deg C increase that easily?

 

"Many island states disagree with the two degree goal and want the UN to adopt a lower threshold of 1.5C.

"A UN analysis of the carbon cutting plans put forward by nations ahead of the Paris meeting concluded that, taken together, they would lead to warming of 2.7C above pre-industrial levels.

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Global warming to increase heat, decrease productivity in SE Asia ("productivity 16% down in Phl")

Global warming to increase heat, decrease productivity in SE Asia ("productivity 16% down in Phl") | Climate & Clean Air Watch | Scoop.it
45 of 50 highest risk cities for lost productivity due to heat stress are in Southeast Asia

Rising temperatures and humidity due to climate change are likely to increase the number of days with unsafe "heat stress," putting Southeast Asia at great risk of significant drops in productivity, a research firm said on Wednesday.

Southeast Asia over the next three decades could lose 16 percent of its labour capacity due to rising heat stress, which could cause absenteeism due to dizziness, fatigue, nausea and even death in extreme cases, the British firm Verisk Maplecroft said.

The company predicted the biggest losses in productivity in Singapore and Malaysia, with 25 percent and 24 percent decreases from current levels. Indonesia could see a 21 percent drop, Cambodia and the Philippines 16 percent and Thailand and Vietnam 12 percent.

"Climate change will push heat stress impacts to boiling point with significant implications for both national economies and the health of vulnerable workers," said James Allan, head of environment at Verisk Maplecroft, in a statement.

The company used climate projections to calculate the drop in labour capacity, based on the occurrence of conditions that prompt heat stress and leave workers unable to perform physical activity.

Twenty of the 50 highest risk cities are in Malaysia, 13 in Indonesia, four in the Philippines and three are in Thailand.

Bert Guevara's insight:

By that time, nobody in the city will want to work outdoors anymore.


"It said by 2045 the number of heat stress days in Singapore and Malaysia will rise to 364 (from 335 and 338 respectively); to 355 from 303 in Indonesia; and to 337 from 276 in the Philippines.

"Twenty of the 50 highest risk cities are in Malaysia, 13 in Indonesia, four in the Philippines and three are in Thailand."

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Summary Information | National Centers for Environmental Information ("0.90 deg.C above global avg")

Summary Information | National Centers for Environmental Information ("0.90 deg.C above global avg") | Climate & Clean Air Watch | Scoop.it
Summary Information

- The September average temperature across global land and ocean surfaces was 1.62°F (0.90°C) above the 20th century average&mdash. This was the highest September temperature on record, surpassing the previous record set last year by +0.12°F (+0.19°C). September's high temperature was also the greatest rise above average for any month in the 136-year historical record, surpassing the previous record set in both February and March this year by 0.02°F (0.01°C).

- The September globally-averaged land surface temperature was 2.09°F (1.16°C) above the 20thcentury average. This was also the highest for September in the 1880–2015 record, surpassing the previous record set in 2009 by +0.16°F (+0.09°C). Record warmth was observed across much of South America and parts of Africa, the Middle East, Europe, and Asia.The September globally-averaged sea surface temperature was 1.46°F (0.81°C) above the 20thcentury average. This was the highest temperature for September in the 1880–2015 record, surpassing the previous record set in 2014 by +0.13°F (+0.07°C).

- On September 11th, Arctic sea ice reached its annual minimum extent at 1.70 million square miles, the fourth smallest extent in the 1979–2015 satellite record, according to the National Snow and Ice Data Center. This was 699,000 square miles below the 1981–2010 average, but 394,000 square miles larger than the record small minimum that occurred in 2012.

- The average Arctic sea ice extent for September 2015 was 720,000 square miles (28.88 percent) below the 1981–2010 average. This was the fourth smallest September extent since records began in 1979, according to analysis by the National Snow and Ice Data Center using data from NOAA and NASA. Below-average sea ice was observed across most regions of the Arctic, while near-average sea ice was observed in the Barents Sea.

Bert Guevara's insight:
These records show that we are nearing the 2 deg C threshold that world leaders want to preserve. All this means is that the planet is definitely heating up.

 

"The year-to-date temperature across global land and ocean surfaces was 1.53°F (0.85°C) above the 20th century average. This was the highest for January–September in the 1880–2015 record, surpassing the previous record set in 2014 by 0.19°F (0.12°C)."

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T@T lab's curator insight, March 25, 4:30 AM
These records show that we are nearing the 2 deg C threshold that world leaders want to preserve. All this means is that the planet is definitely heating up.

 

"The year-to-date temperature across global land and ocean surfaces was 1.53°F (0.85°C) above the 20th century average. This was the highest for January–September in the 1880–2015 record, surpassing the previous record set in 2014 by 0.19°F (0.12°C)."

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5 Ways to Reduce the Drivers of Climate Change ("economic growth balanced with environmental concerns")

5 Ways to Reduce the Drivers of Climate Change ("economic growth balanced with environmental concerns") | Climate & Clean Air Watch | Scoop.it
In a lecture at Georgetown University, World Bank Group President Jim Yong Kim lays out five key areas where policy and growth choices can reduce the drivers of climate change.

“We have to keep the economy growing – there is no turning back on growth,” President Kim told the student audience. “What we have to do is decouple growth from carbon emissions.”

Put a price on carbon

Cutting emissions starts with clear policy signals.

Carbon pricing systems – such as emissions trading systems that cap emissions or carbon taxes that charge per ton – send a long-term signal to companies by creating an incentive to reduce polluting behaviors and to invest in cleaner energy choices and low-carbon innovation.

End fossil fuel subsidies

Fossil fuel subsidies send a different signal – one that can encourage waste and discourage low-carbon growth. By phasing out harmful fossil fuel subsidies, countries can reallocate their spending to where it is most needed and most effective, including proving targeted support for the poor.

Build low-carbon, resilient cities

Getting prices right is one part of the equation. Another piece is building a sustainable future, because all development happens in the context of climate change.

Increase energy efficiency and use of renewable energy

When we talk about energy, we have to talk about access. Worldwide, about 1.2 billion people lack access to electricity and 2.8 billion rely on solid fuels for cooking, such as wood, charcoal, and coal, which cause harmful indoor air pollution.

Implement climate-smart agriculture and nurture forest landscapes

The fifth area for action takes in both mitigation and adaptation. Climate-smart agriculture techniques help farmers increase their farms’ productivity and resilience to the impacts of climate change, such as droughts, while also creating carbon sinks that help reduce net emissions. Forests, too, are valuable carbon sinks that absorb carbon and store it in soils, trees, and foliage.

 

 

Bert Guevara's insight:

After dwelling on the causes of climate change, here are the positive steps for climate mitigation.

 

"Global efforts to reduce emissions are having an effect. Last week, the chief economist of the International Energy Agency announced that global CO2 emissions had been flat in 2014 for the first time in four decades without an accompanying economic downturn, while the global economy grew by 3 percent.

“We have to keep the economy growing – there is no turning back on growth,” President Kim told the student audience. “What we have to do is decouple growth from carbon emissions.”

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Indonesia haze: Child evacuation plan prepared - NewsHub ("as bad as the air can get from smoke")

Indonesia haze: Child evacuation plan prepared - NewsHub ("as bad as the air can get from smoke") | Climate & Clean Air Watch | Scoop.it
Indonesia is preparing warships and ferries in case it needs to evacuate children affected by haze caused by the country's illegal forest fires.

Co-ordinating Security Minister Luhut Pandjaitan said an evacuation was one contingency among several others.

South-East Asia has been particularly hit hard this year by the haze, an annual occurrence.

It has caused serious health issues, particularly among those living in the epicentres Kalimantan and Sumatra.

Mr Pandjaitan said authorities had identified at least six provinces where children and babies could be evacuated, local media say, but any evacuation would depend on approval from President Joko Widodo.

Other options include moving residents to government offices equipped with air purifiers, Reuters news agency reports.

The haze is caused by farmers clearing land for plantations for the palm oil, pulp and paper industries, primarily in the Indonesian province of Kalimantan on Borneo and the island of Sumatra.

Residents in those areas have been living with hazardous levels of smoke in the past two months.

Indonesia has struggled to put out the fires, most of which are on peat land which burns for longer and produces more smoke than other fires.

US-based environmental research organisation World Resource Institute said earlier this week that the daily carbon emissions caused by the fires were surpassing the average emissions by the United States.

The haze has blanketed Singapore and Malaysia as well, straining diplomatic ties, and has recently drifted northwards to affect southern Thailand and the Philippines.

Bert Guevara's insight:

This is the first time I heard about major evacuations caused by air pollution. This problem has reached Mindanao and is causing air traffic woes.


"The haze has blanketed Singapore and Malaysia as well, straining diplomatic ties, and has recently drifted northwards to affect southern Thailand and the Philippines."

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Study Sees Shortfall in Methane Emissions Estimate | Climate Central ("it may negate carbon reduction efforts")

Study Sees Shortfall in Methane Emissions Estimate | Climate Central ("it may negate carbon reduction efforts") | Climate & Clean Air Watch | Scoop.it
A Cornell study suggests that natural gas may be a poor bridge fuel between coal and renewables as a way to mitigate climate change.

Carbon dioxide emissions from fossil fuels in the U.S. fell between 2009 and 2013, but greenhouse gases from burning those fuels went up. The reason? More methane than previously thought may have been released into the atmosphere from fracking and burning natural gas, according to new research from Cornell University.

In a warming world, natural gas is often touted as a “bridge fuel” between carbon-laden coal and a full embrace of renewables for electric power generation. When natural gas is burned, it releases about half as much carbon dioxide as coal. In other words, the more coal-fired power plants that can be replaced by those running on natural gas, the better it may be for the climate.

Some scientists, including Cornell University environmental biologist Robert Howarth, have questioned natural gas’s use as a “bridge fuel” because producing the gas, most of which is released from underground shale formations through hydraulic fracturing, often emits a lot of methane, a potent greenhouse gas.

Methane has about 35 times the power to warm the atmosphere as carbon dioxide over the span of a century, and about 86 times carbon’s warming power over 20 years — figure known as global warming potential, or GWP.

“Since 2008, coal use has decreased, in part due to the recession but also in part due to replacement of coal with shale gas to produce electricity,” Howarth said. “This reduction in coal has led to a decrease in CO2 emissions. However, methane emissions have increased dramatically because of the increased production of shale gas. When both gases are considered, the total greenhouse gas emissions from the energy sector of the U.S. have been rising since 2008 at the fastest rate seen in many decades.”

 

Bert Guevara's insight:

As the world is focused on carbon emissions, the other gas - methane - is getting away quietly.

 

"In research published Monday in the journal Energy and Emission Control Technologies, however, Howarth suggests that as fracking and shale gas production began booming in the U.S., methane emissions spiked, negating any climate benefit from falling carbon dioxide emissions.

"In a previous paper written in 2014, Howarth painted methane emissions from oil and gas production in dire terms, saying that ignoring fracking-related methane emissions would lead to a climate change tipping point and “global catastrophe” from which there is no return."

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Philippines leads climate-vulnerable countries in crafting action plan - NewsHub ("they're called V-20")

Philippines leads climate-vulnerable countries in crafting action plan - NewsHub ("they're called V-20") | Climate & Clean Air Watch | Scoop.it
MANILA, Philippines - The Philippines led 19 other countries in agreeing to a high-level initiative that lays out financial means to combat climate change, which strips their vulnerable economies by more than $40 billion a year on top of tens of thousands of fatalities.

The Vulnerable 20 (V20) Group, led by Finance Secretary Cesar Purisima, on Thursday concluded their inaugural meetings in Lima, Peru with the approval of an action plan to tackle changing climate for the next five years.

"We are united in our shared vulnerability and exposure to a changing climate," the V20 said on its communique issued after the meetings.

"We, the V20, commit to act collectively and decisively to promote the mobilization of public and private climate finance from wide ranging sources, including international, regional and domestic mobilization," the group said.

In a major first step, the V20 agreed to set up climate risk pooling mechanism, where both governments and the private sector would contribute and provide insurance mechanisms to absorb the impact of natural calamities.

The pool, among others, would work as a shared facility where risks are distributed across member-countries. In such a way, the fund could get activated once a disaster hits a particular V20 member.

Risk-adaptation measures will also be a key component of the fund, where contributions will be based on "risk-determined pricing" and "index-based" risk transfers.

Since state revenues need to be available upon disposal, the V20 group also expressed support to "innovative" revenue generation methods, including the imposition of financial transaction tax.

"The same can generate additional resources sourced from capital markets, while serving as a stabilizing financial measure," the group explained.

Bert Guevara's insight:

We may as well admit that we belong to the most disaster vulnerable countries and thereby take the lead.


"The V20 is chaired by the Philippines with the following members: Afghanistan, Bangladesh, Barbados, Bhutan, Costa Rica, Ethiopia, Ghana, Kenya, Kiribati, Madagascar, Maldives, Nepal, Rwanda, Saint Lucia, Timor-Leste, Tuvalu, Vanuatu and Vietnam."

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Naomi Klein: 'Why do we look away from the horror of climate change?' | Film | The Guardian ("watch the video")

Naomi Klein: 'Why do we look away from the horror of climate change?' | Film | The Guardian ("watch the video") | Climate & Clean Air Watch | Scoop.it
Klein’s latest book, This Changes Everything, addresses apathy in the face of ecological catastrophe. Now, she’s made a movie – as it opens in New York, Klein discusses why we’re unable to act as disaster approaches

“I’m trying to get at this state that so many of us are in,” says Klein, “actively looking away from the horror. What is it about those melting glaciers and desperate polar bears that make us want to look away? The answer is this 400 year-old story which tells us that the sickness is us; that it’s human nature and therefore we’re doomed.”

The book and film are a result of Klein’s need to provide the antithesis to that narrative. “I think a lot of climate communication is based on the premise that people don’t know these scary facts,” says Klein. She qualifies: “It’s not that we don’t know – it’s that we actively do not want to read about it. What sets our project apart is we’re asking, what is the story that makes this seem so hopeless?”

Klein’s well-reviewed book, published in 2014, is a rousing call-to-arms that puts forth the argument that capitalism and controlling climate change are incompatible. Lewis’s film retains very much the same effect but, being a film, it makes the battle for a better planet that much more tangible by presenting several powerful portraits of communities affected in various ways by climate change.

In Alberta, Canada, a young indigenous leader in Tar Sands country fights for access to a restricted military base in search of answers about an environmental disaster in progress; in India, where booming growth demands electrical power stations, a rural community takes on the energy company; in Greece, against the backdrop of the country’s economic crisis, a social movement rises when mining and drilling projects threaten the tourism economy; and in Montana, a couple fight a company whose oil line has ruptured, polluting the water that feeds their goat farm.

 

Bert Guevara's insight:

Getting the message across is still a challenge.

 

“It’s not that we don’t know – it’s that we actively do not want to read about it. What sets our project apart is we’re asking, what is the story that makes this seem so hopeless?”

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