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Report: Teachers Aren't Trained to Praise Their Students

Report: Teachers Aren't Trained to Praise Their Students | Classroom Management | Scoop.it
A new study finds that education schools aren't teaching classroom management strategies in a focused way.
Molly Carlson's insight:

This article is about how teachers are taught and encouraged to do things other than encourage their students and there is a lack of proper training. One study written about here says that they, “studied the curricula at the 122 undergraduate and graduate teaching programs and found that nearly all address classroom management, but that most do not do some comprehensively… ‘Instruction and practice on classroom management strategies are often scattered throughout the curriculum, rarely receiving the connected and concentrated focus they deserve.’” I find this very scary and worrisome that the schools are not relaying the management information to their students but rather throwing tidbits here and there. I feel like if classroom management is seen as such a huge issue in today’s schooling then why not put a greater emphasis on it when the students are in schools.

 

Another major part of this article is how encouraging students is not being emphasized to teachers. “According to this chart, education programs put much more emphasis on showing new teachers how to make rules and routines than on how to encourage students for a job well done.” I think it is the most important job of a teacher to encourage the students while they are learning so they can gain a lifelong love of learning. If the teachers are not encouraging their students, I feel like then the students are just going to feel forced into doing the work and not actually like doing it. The joy of learning and school will be taken away from a young age. I think that teachers should put a major emphasis on this encouragement, even if it means taking some emphasis away from rules. 

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 13, 2014 10:15 PM

Is this something we need to be trained for?

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Report: Teachers Aren't Trained to Praise Their Students

Report: Teachers Aren't Trained to Praise Their Students | Classroom Management | Scoop.it
A new study finds that education schools aren't teaching classroom management strategies in a focused way.
Molly Carlson's insight:

This article is about how teachers are taught and encouraged to do things other than encourage their students and there is a lack of proper training. One study written about here says that they, “studied the curricula at the 122 undergraduate and graduate teaching programs and found that nearly all address classroom management, but that most do not do some comprehensively… ‘Instruction and practice on classroom management strategies are often scattered throughout the curriculum, rarely receiving the connected and concentrated focus they deserve.’” I find this very scary and worrisome that the schools are not relaying the management information to their students but rather throwing tidbits here and there. I feel like if classroom management is seen as such a huge issue in today’s schooling then why not put a greater emphasis on it when the students are in schools.

 

Another major part of this article is how encouraging students is not being emphasized to teachers. “According to this chart, education programs put much more emphasis on showing new teachers how to make rules and routines than on how to encourage students for a job well done.” I think it is the most important job of a teacher to encourage the students while they are learning so they can gain a lifelong love of learning. If the teachers are not encouraging their students, I feel like then the students are just going to feel forced into doing the work and not actually like doing it. The joy of learning and school will be taken away from a young age. I think that teachers should put a major emphasis on this encouragement, even if it means taking some emphasis away from rules. 

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Ivon Prefontaine's curator insight, March 13, 2014 10:15 PM

Is this something we need to be trained for?

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Classroom Management: Finding the Balance Between Too Rigid and Too Flexible

Classroom Management: Finding the Balance Between Too Rigid and Too Flexible | Classroom Management | Scoop.it
For quite some time now I've been interested in a widely held set of assumptions faculty make about the need to assert control at the beginning of a course.
Molly Carlson's insight:

This article from a PhD professor addresses the typical assumption that teachers should be stricter at the beginning of the term and then slowly loosen up as the semester continues. “The rationale behind this approach rests on the assumption that if a teacher loses control of a class, it is very hard to regain the upper hand.” The strictness at the beginning will allow the students to see the authority of the teacher and not challenge it. I do not know if I think this is the best approach because the students will realize that the teacher is loosening the reigns and they will take advantage of that. I also think that the students are going to do whatever they want no matter what because they will just become sneaky. I think it is more important to maintain a classroom properly then to just have rules that the students are going to find loop holes in them anyways.

 

I also find it very encouraging that this PhD is questioning how to best manage a classroom. “Lately I’ve been wondering how much control is necessary to set the condition for learning and whether that amount of control doesn’t need to be offset by a certain amount of freedom so that the students can make the learning experience meaningful to them.” I think this is a question that every teacher wonders, so knowing that a very learned professor has the same questions makes me feel not alone in my fears about managing a classroom. “A tightly controlled classroom environment certainly makes for a safer, saner teaching. If all potential challenges to authority are headed off at the pass, then the teacher can devote full attention to the content, and isn’t that where the teacher’s expertise really shines? And so the classroom becomes a place that showcases teaching more than learning?”  I think this is a very interesting point that sometimes the managing of the classroom can before more focused on the teacher and rather than the students. Just like it is frustrating when a referee in a sports match makes calls to bring attention to himself, so also a teacher can enforce rules to make herself the center of the classroom. I think this is corrupting the school system in general when it becomes more about the teacher than the students. I think the teacher should be there as the supporter to help the students in any way possible. I think our school systems would greatly improve if all the teachers became more selflessly devoted to helping their students become the best they can possibly be. 

 

I think this can be reflected back to the article about the teachers finding the best classroom management ideas for them because if they are following cookie cutter methods in which do not help the students or follow the typical method of being harder at first and then lightening as time goes on. These methods are not the best ways of managing a classroom, so it takes time and effort for the teachers so find the most adequate ones for them and their particular set of students.

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Teaching Maths with Meaning: Why I Will Never Use A Behaviour Chart Again - Linky

Teaching Maths with Meaning: Why I Will Never Use A Behaviour Chart Again - Linky | Classroom Management | Scoop.it
Molly Carlson's insight:

This is a blog about how one teacher will never use a behavior chart. She explains how this is a one size fits all method for classroom management and did not work well for all children because some students never changed positions but once they did they would cry. She shows how this is not personal enough to make an actual impact because each student and class is different and has different needs. In this specific classroom, “we have a class essential agreement – we came up with together what we want our classroom to look like. Everything is listed in a positive way. We refer back to it when we need to.”  I really like how this method because it is now personal for the class and everyone is on board with the expectations. I love the fact that the expectations are written in a positive way. I think there is too much negativity in schools from teachers yelling and their not being enough encouragement, so this way the students can think about what they are supposed to do instead of what they are not allowed to do. I am currently tutoring at an elementary school and the teachers yell at the students too often causing the students to be afraid of the teachers instead of the teacher being seen as a supporter in the learning process. Because of how this is written, I think it positively reinforces good behavior instead of disciplining bad behavior. This related to the article explaining the different types of teachers who either manage or discipline through the way that the disciplining teacher just has sets of tricks to get the job done instead of actually relating to the students. This chart allows the teacher to be more of a managing teacher than a disciplining one.   

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Cup Management

http://bit.ly/qeIHaU Cup Management
Molly Carlson's insight:

This is a youtube video that discuses a way to manage the classroom through the use of a red, yellow, and green cup. The cups are stacked and start on green. “If a group is starting to get a little loud, then walk on over and change their cup to yellow…it’s a visual sitting right in the middle of the table.” This allows the teacher to not have to raise his or her voice or even give constant reminders because the students will know exactly what the cups mean. I think this is a wonderful idea because it allows the students to know exactly what the teacher is thinking while still being able to work things out as a group instead of the teacher having to micromanage. I strongly believe that the students have a greater influence on each other than the teacher does because the teacher only sees some of what is happening while the students see everything. Just the little bit of peer pressure will push the students to change their behavior and act in the proper way.  This reflects back to the Disciple By Design article that talks about how nonverbal cuing is very important. The teacher is able to change the color of the cup without saying a word and the students will know exactly what that means for them and how they should change. I think this form of cups is better than the ringing of the bell method to get students attention.

 

This also allows each individual group to be looked at individually as compared to the entire class. “Why penalize the group that is working quietly and using the appropriate indoor voice in their group as opposed to the group that is completely loud and crazy.” I think this is such a great idea that the teacher is focusing on each group. As a student, I was always really quiet, but some of my fellow classmates were really loud. It always upset me when I would get in trouble because of their talking, so this way the teacher can really pinpoint the problem on a small group level so that the people who are following directions do not have to be punished for something they did not do.

 

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Sweet Rhyme - Pure Reason: Classroom Management and some ...

Sweet Rhyme - Pure Reason: Classroom Management and some ... | Classroom Management | Scoop.it
For the last several years I have mentored a yearlong intern from Penn State, and each year I am reminded what it is like to be in a classroom as a brand new teacher with limited classroom management skills.
Molly Carlson's insight:

I think this blog post is absolutely fantastic for explaining classroom management. Two different methods (The Rules and The Scoreboard) are clearly explained.

 

The Rules involved five rules which each one has its own individual hand motion. For example, “Rule #1: Follow directions quickly and quietly (hand shoot out at quickly and comes back as one finger to lips at quietly)” I think this is a fantastic way on getting students to know, understand, and remember the rules because they are so personal to them instead of being boring things they have to follow.

 

The Scoreboard is a way to keep track of the class’s good and bad behavior. “Whenever the kids are following the rules flawlessly they are given a point. If they aren’t following the rules, or some grievous happens then the teacher earns a point.” This particular uses those points in a video game leveling way. The amount of points the students have more than the teacher to be saved. Once that amount reaches ten, the class ‘levels up” and they receive a reward. As the levels becoming higher, the rewards become larger. The teacher also makes this scoreboard methods fun for the children when they receive a point because she allows them to have a one second party while she is writing the point on the board. But when the teacher receives the point, then the students are to respond with a groan. As soon as this short outbreak finishes the students are to give their full attention to the teacher. I think this is a great method because it provides possible reinforcement of good behaviors as compared to some other behavior charts that only punish the children. I agree with this teacher in how she wants to reward the students for good behavior and punish the students based on the severity of the action instead of the same action for wrong behavior. I like this more than the clothes pin chart that I recently found and previously scooped, because that was more of a generic every action was punished the same instead of it being based on what the student did.

 

I also like the aspects she listed for how she maintains her classroom. These included building a strong community, planning for every part of the school day in advance; following through on everything she says to the kids; and having high expectations for behavior, independence, and academics. In my mind, these are things that are very important to have set up and ready before you even met the students. These qualities will help successfully run the classroom while keeping it orderly and still a good environment to learn. 

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Controlling a classroom isn't as easy as ABC

Controlling a classroom isn't as easy as ABC | Classroom Management | Scoop.it
Students filed into Chris Cox's dim classroom at Daniel Webster Middle School in Los Angeles' Sawtelle neighborhood, took their seats and immediately began working on a language arts warmup...
Molly Carlson's insight:

This news article specifically addresses the classroom management issue for young teachers. I find this perspective very interesting because it comes from teachers and principals who have been working for a long time and have been able to notice these details over time. One of the important tips in this articles is that “Students must ‘understand first and foremost that you care about them, but that you mean what you say.’” I think this is super important for all teachers to know because the students are so young and can so be influenced by things that the teacher does; so if the teacher seems like he or she does not care about the students then these students may forever feel like teachers do not care. I think the following through with what is said is probably the best piece of advice I have heard. I think back to the times in which I was a student and I did not want to follow the rules of a teacher when I knew they would not follow through with what they said. I listened and followed instructions so much better for the teachers that did what they said and enforced the rules.

 

This article also talks about how California is trying to help with this classroom management problem. “There is a widespread recognition that young teachers need support once they enter the classroom. California spends more than $100 million annually on mentoring program for new teacher.” I think this is such a fantastic idea, especially because classroom management is something that is mostly learned when the teacher actually gets their classroom rather than in student teaching. So allowing a teacher to have a mentor teacher who has been through this and has made the same mistakes and felt the same inadequacies will really encourage the younger teachers that this is a possible goal to accomplish managing a classroom successfully. One of the success stories mentioned explained how a teacher went from being in the middle of a crayon fight while just muttering the words found in his teaching textbook to now being able to successfully manage his classroom and demand respect. This was only accomplished through “A veteran teacher took Cox under her wing and told him to place his teacher textbook in the drawer, forget about the paperwork for the first week of school and focus solely on rules and procedures.” I think that having a supportive teacher there to guide me in the hard times will really being the most helpful thing when I get a classroom of my own. Most of these articles explaining different issues all come back to say that teachers have to learn this on the job and it takes different attempts and methods to finally master it. 

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New Teachers Rarely Learn Classroom Management (washingtonpost.com)

New Teachers Rarely Learn Classroom Management (washingtonpost.com) | Classroom Management | Scoop.it
Molly Carlson's insight:

This Washington Post Article explains how classroom management is not always being properly taught to prospective teachers and a lot of the learning about it happens on the job. I really like what one teacher is quoted with; “schools only make it worse with their harsh treatment of novices. ‘We hire them, give them the worst schedules with very little meaningful support,’ he said, ‘and the culture of a school is that if you ask for help, you are having trouble,’ a stigma that can ruin a career that has barely begun.” I think this is such a powerful quote because it is so very true that asking for help seems like a weakness. I know I am going to be thrown into that culture in a few years, so hearing it from an actual teacher makes it seem more real and scary. It does not make sense to me that the new teachers are given the tougher students since they have less experience and the returning teachers get the higher level and better behaved students; I personally believe that the new teachers should have the better students so that they are able to learn from their mistakes without completely losing control of their students.

 

 Another point I found particularly interesting is that, “Some universities don’t require prospective teachers to take a single course in the subject of keeping children under control. And many states do not require proof of adequate classroom management skills, even as they raise the required passing scores of teacher licensing exams that cover subject matter and pedagogy.” I think classroom management is a more relevant issue for teachers to know about then some of the material they are being tested on. Classroom material can be researched and learned before being taught, but management techniques are something that is going to be used during almost every second that the students are in the school.

 

This article applies to the learning of classroom management ideas of teachers and will help me to be better informed before I am thrown into the field. “Gail Ritchie, an award-winning elementary school teacher in Fairfax County, recommends that young teachers try different management styles until they find one that suits them. The worst thing, Ritchie said, is to force a teacher to strap on a management system that doesn’t fit.” This is very encouraging to me because it says that learning these methods will not come on the first try but that is okay and everyone goes through this process. It lets me know that I am not alone and eventually I will be the older teacher that understands the best method for me and can encourage the new teachers that it will be okay. This article also relates to the Jesuit article which talks about finding the best classroom management methods for you. Both articles show that the time it takes to find these methods will be completely worth it in the end.  

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Are we on the right “track” with CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT? [Part TWO]…

Are we on the right “track” with CLASSROOM MANAGEMENT? [Part TWO]… | Classroom Management | Scoop.it
When we hear some of the “horror stories” about classroom management, we could be forgiven for believing that every classroom looks something like this: In truth, most classes are nothing like this...
Molly Carlson's insight:

This article takes an interesting perspective on classroom management. This specifically looks at the type of teacher than a specific method to use. As a future teacher I find this very important and interesting to know about different kinds of teachers because I want to be the very best teacher that I can be. I think that knowing this material beforehand and being able to reflect on my previous teachers will really help me to improve and notice my teaching ways. In the article the author says, “I remember (and respect) the ones who took a real interest in me, who engaged me, who recognized my achievements and challenged me to live up to my potential.” I think this is really cool because I want to be the teacher that is remembered in a positive way. I am not going into teaching because it is easy or because it is my back up but rather I want to make a positive impact in a child’s life and allow them to see the joys of learning while still having a childhood. She continues on by saying that, “The ‘disciplinarians’ in contrast (and as I learned as young teacher) were also more likely to be ‘grumpy,’ not pull their weight in a team and suffer from stress, premature aging and illness.” I never want to be the teacher that is not liked by my students and colleagues. My goal is not to make my student’s lives harder and take their joy away. The deeper I know about these two different types of teaching, the more apparent it is to me how important classroom management. “Teachers who equate classroom management with ‘discipline’ are more likely to rely on a ‘bag of tricks approach’ to running their classroom.” Some of these tricks included being overly strict, using scare tactics, and abdication of responsibility. “Effective teachers manage their classrooms. Ineffective teachers discipline their classrooms.” I want to be a teacher that is able to manage her classroom well and does not have to rely on disciplinary actions which only limit the children and may result in them having a worse behavior. I think this article works well with the Jesuit article which talks about being a teacher with integrity and treating her students properly. If I am not able to manage a classroom well, then it will most likely result in my not treating my students with the respect they deserve. 

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A Jesuit's Journey: A Jesuit's Advice On Classroom Management

A Jesuit's Journey: A Jesuit's Advice On Classroom Management | Classroom Management | Scoop.it
Looking back upon my own experiences as a teacher, I can attest without any hesitation that the steepest learning curve to contend with is classroom management. Students I taught as a first-year teacher, now well into college ...
Molly Carlson's insight:

This blogger comes from the Jesuit background, and thus her religion influences how she is in the classroom. This blog covers a variety of topics and even gives a step by step list on what to do in some circumstances. This step by step list starts with the teacher figuring out the subgroups in the classroom then identifies the issue and if that needs to have attention devoted towards it. I think this stage of figuring out if the problem should be focused on is very important because if the teacher focuses on every little detail then that becomes the main focus of the classroom instead of the material. The list continues with methods of controlling the students through being clear about expectations, following through on your word and not negotiating with students, no yelling, and the most important thing to do is to show your students respect. I enjoy the fact that this blogger emphasizes the need to show the student’s respect. I feel as though students will give respect back to someone in which they feel respected, so if they teacher is constantly tearing down the students and belittling them, it will be very hard for the students to give the teacher the respect they deserve. I think it is so important that the students feel safe in the classroom and showing the students respect is a wonderful way to do that. The blogger explains the no negotiation policy wonderfully when she says, “The USA does not negotiate with terrorists, so don’t negotiate with freshman.” This teacher also gives some good pointers that include “don’t waste time on taking role,” “stand at the front of the class when they enter,” “be clear with them, in an ongoing way, of what the immediate expectation is,” and “move around.” These are all pointers that I want to use in my classroom, but they would not necessarily be the first things I think of, but rather sometime I learned with time. I found this blog very informative while still be laid back and fun to read. I love hearing about different teacher’s experience and being able to learn from them. This blogger makes the point that, “especially for young teachers, it’s okay to make mistakes. No one expects you to have a bag of tricks at the ready. You are expected however, to have the sense to seek out good mentors. If there’s a teacher who has excellent classroom management skills, take the initiative and invite the person to observe you.” I think this is a great point that teachers should have a community surrounding them and that desire to encourage you to be the best teacher you can be. I think if a teacher could not find a good mentor in their vicinity, reading these types of blogs and learning from other experienced teachers would be largely beneficial.  

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Discipline by Design

Discipline by Design | Classroom Management | Scoop.it
Molly Carlson's insight:

This is a website with eleven different techniques on how to manage a classroom. These techniques are focusing, direct instruction, monitoring, modeling, non-verbal cuing, environmental control, low-profile intervention, assertive discipline, assertive I-messages, humanistic I-messages, and positive discipline. Each of these techniques is explained in a very understandable way and there are even examples for all of them.  

I do not think I agree with one of the methods used for low-profile intervention. “While lecturing to her class this teacher makes effective use of namedropping. If she sees a student talking or off task, she simply drops the youngster’s name into her dialogue in a natural way. ‘And you see, David, we carry the one to the tens column.’ David hears his name and is drawn back on task. The rest of the class doesn’t seem to notice.” In my schooling year, if a teacher said a student’s name at any point it meant they were being called out and all attention went on them. If I was ever called out in a “natural way” I would become thoroughly embarrassed and my attention would move further away from the teacher. I feel like students need a way to be corrected that does not bring about attention from others, especially if the problem is a very minor one. I also do not like the nickel bell example used for non-verbal cuing. As a student hearing the bell brought fear into my heart. I feel like there are better methods for getting student’s attention then ringing a loud bell. I do agree that non-verbal cuing is important, but the way in which that is done can determine the successfulness of it.

I really like the idea of positive disciple. I have been a part of and observed too many schools in which the teachers are always yelling at their students and loudly telling students everything that they are doing wrong. I personally believe that a positive classroom experience allows the student to feel safer so they can learn better. I like the quote that says, “Instead of ‘no-running in the room,’ use ‘move through the building in an orderly manner.” I feel like this still gives the same message, but the one is spoken in a very understanding and kind way as the other seems like an order and more rules to follow. 

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