Nutrition in Schools
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Kids on school cafeteria options

Kids on school cafeteria options | Nutrition in Schools | Scoop.it
We've heard how dozens of nutrition experts,school officials,beverage industry leaders andchefs feel about kids eating healthy food
Darby Whitehair's insight:

This is a cartoon about the cost of food in schools. Kids will eat food that is healthy, but only if it cost less than the cheap junk food. Vending machines would be used if they had healthy food as long as a student could afford it. It is hard to have nutrition in schools and have students choose healthy options if the healthy food is more expensive. Kids and families do not have the means to always buy organic food. Therefore if schools offer healthy food for the same price as junk food students will line up to eat and pay for it.

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How Candy as a Reward Degrades Healthy Nutrition in Schools - Workout Nirvana

How Candy as a Reward Degrades Healthy Nutrition in Schools - Workout Nirvana | Nutrition in Schools | Scoop.it
Nutrition in schools and candy just don't go together. So why is candy still used as a reward in the classroom?
Darby Whitehair's insight:

This is a post on Pinterest by a mother who has an issue with candy still being used as a reward system in schools. The most interesting part of this is the section where she replaces all the defenses for snack with school lunches. It is true that we say candy is unhealthy but part of a kids life. But we wouldn't say that about lunches. Treats may be cheaper than other rewards, but we wouldn't want our schools serving unhealthy lunches to our children just because they are cheaper. She also mentioned some issues revolving around candy as a reward system. In schools we try to promote healthy eating habits. Candy as a reward does not promote healthy eating habits because it encourages students to eat when they are not hungry.  This also makes me think about specified lunch times though. Not every kid is hungry at 12:00. Some like to snack throughout the day, others like earlier or later lunches, so aren't we doing the same thing when we feed them group lunches?

 

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Batavia Local Schools - School Nutrition And Fitness

Batavia Local Schools - School Nutrition And Fitness | Nutrition in Schools | Scoop.it
School Nutrition and Fitness provides a districts nutrition services department with the tools and information needed to get the word out about the program.
Darby Whitehair's insight:

A great image of what to eat during lunch. I know that they teach us the food pyramid in elementary, middle and high school, but nobody sits there and makes sure they are getting the right amount of servings of each group. By breaking down a lunch tray into these five categories, students can see what a well-rounded meal will loook like. I like how it gives a requirement that 3 out of the 5 must be chosen. I think it gives it variety while still ensuring that students are making the most of their meal. I also like how there are two different trays. One for younger students and one for teenagers. Our food needs change throughout our years, you cannot expect a first grader and a ninth grader to eat the same amount of food .

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School Nutrition Changes in Massachusetts - Andover's Effort

School Nutrition Changes in Massachusetts - Andover's Effort | Nutrition in Schools | Scoop.it

As a part of the effort to improve children’s health in Massachusetts, the State Legislature asked the Massachusetts Departments of Public Health and the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education to develop nutrition standards for our public schools. The new standards refer to the nutritional content of food and were developed by health and education experts using guidelines from the Institute of Medicine.
These nutrition standards apply to “competitive” foods and drinks provided in public schools during the school day, including thirty minutes before and thirty minutes after the school day ends. Competitive foods and drinks do not apply to school breakfast/lunch programs as they are regulated by the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA). These standards do, however, apply to classrooms, hallways, school grounds, school stores, snack bars, vending machines, concession stands, booster sales and fundraisers, school sponsored or related events, classroom parties, student councils and club activities that occur during the school day.  See the “At-A-Glance” summary of the nutrition standards. 


Via Seth Bilazarian, MD
Darby Whitehair's insight:

This is a quick glance at the snack food allowed in Andover Schools in Mass. I find this extremely interesting. I know that when I was in elementary school our teachers were allowed to bring in candy, food whatever they want and give it to us. Then near fifth grade they were told that anything they brought had to be prepackaged. One of our substitutes was told she was no longer allowed to bring in jolly ranchers her staple item of substitituing. I can understand why the school system wants to make sure students are getting proper nutrition. However, I find it extremely interesting that this just involves snacks because the school lunch and breakfast is approved by the USDA. I didn't know that, I thought each school system made their own decison. It makes me wonder if every kid in America is eating the same variation of a lunch.

 

 

 

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Fast food: Students struggle with healthy options in short lunch periods | The Center for Investigative Reporting

Fast food: Students struggle with healthy options in short lunch periods | The Center for Investigative Reporting | Nutrition in Schools | Scoop.it
New federal regulations require healthier food in schools. But eating right takes time – more time than many students have.
Darby Whitehair's insight:

This article discusses the time constraints of lunch and how it affects the nutrition of students. I mentioned how I was curious about group lunches and what that did to students eating habits when I was thinking about the article with treats as rewards. However, I didn't think about it in this way. Students sometimes don't have enough time to eat. This hinders their nutrition and keeps them from getting the energy needed to perform in school. I never thought about this. But they also mentioned that quality of food is related to the time frame in which students have to eat. If they have to make lunch for the entire school at the same time then the food is going to get cold and be of lesser quality. Then when students get it after waiting in line they have less time to eat it and it doesn't taste as good as it could so they just don't eat.

 

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Special Report: Kids Health Matters: School Nutrition - YouTube

All this week we've been focusing on childhood obesity in our special reports:  Kids Health Matters.This morning, we go into a school to examine the lunch pr...
Darby Whitehair's insight:

This video looks at an elementary school lunch. It has an indepth look at both students and cafeteria staff perspectives on the changing food within the schools. I find this video really thought provoking. A question arose that I hadn't thought of before. They asked whether or not the students were eating the new healthy food. I had never thought about this. You can give children food and they know they have to take it, but what if they aren't eating it. In this video the students they interviewed said that they enjoyed the new food even if they missed the cookies they used to get served. I also wondered about something else mentioned. Many kids bring lunches from home. Sometimes they are great, but other times it is just  a quickly thrown together collection of items in the pantry. This can be a huge problem when looking at nutrition.

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California High Schools Scrap 'Plastic Foods' in Favor of Real Nutrition

California High Schools Scrap 'Plastic Foods' in Favor of Real Nutrition | Nutrition in Schools | Scoop.it
In Escondido, school chefs are now cooking 10,000 meals a day from scratch, and seeing academic and behavioral improvement as a result.
Darby Whitehair's insight:

This article talks about the schools in Escondido making all their food from scratch. It talksabout the schools goal to make healthier better tasting food and how it meets the standards of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010. I find this extremely interesting. Making food from scratch in high school sounds gourmet. I never ate lunch at high school, I always brought my food, because it never appealed to me. I think a meal does so much for your energy levels, your attitude throughout the day. Having meals cooked to your liking and having real food and not greasy fries sounds much more appealing. I was on Free and Reduced Meals and if my school food would have been as tasty as this schools I'm sure I would have cashed in on my school lunches.

 

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Shranna's curator insight, January 23, 2014 11:18 PM

This clip is about a director who is on a constant mission to gather voluntery chef who believes in improving school meals. This consist of organic produce where there is no mystery items in meals. The food is 'real' and nutrious. The director briefly describes the benefits of changing the meals in school but also states the revenues that are exceeding expenses. She believes food made from scratch and having variety is a positive attempt for the future of these kids.