Classroom geography
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Classroom geography
Random items that I think might be useful in the classroom
Curated by Mathijs Booden
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Where is the riskiest place to live?

Where is the riskiest place to live? | Classroom geography | Scoop.it
The world risk index reveals which countries are most at risk from rising sea levels and the increasing frequency of floods, droughts and storms
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Warnings did not stop development in Colorado Springs' landslide zone

Warnings did not stop development in Colorado Springs' landslide zone | Classroom geography | Scoop.it
Thousands of homes in southwest Colorado Springs were built in the slide zone, despite repeated warnings from geologists who said the area was risky for

Via Catherine Russell
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Infographic - South China Sea defence spending

Infographic - South China Sea defence spending | Classroom geography | Scoop.it
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Boulders raining down on the Karakorum Highway in Pakistan

Passengers stuck in boulders raining down on Karakorum Highway 'Pakistan'
Mathijs Booden's insight:
Analysis at http://blogs.agu.org/landslideblog/2016/03/28/a-terrifying-video-of-shooting-rocks-from-the-karakorum-highway-in-pakistan/
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Why China Is Building Disposable Cities

Why China Is Building Disposable Cities | Classroom geography | Scoop.it
At times it seems as if China is one colossal construction site. The old is being replaced with the new and the new is being replaced with the newer in a perpetual cycle of destruction and creation. The sounds of jackhammers, backhoes, and pile drivers is the soundtrack of a country recreating itself as readily as the changing patterns in a rotating kaleidoscope. Like an aging actress, since the beginning of the economic boom period in the late 1970s China has undergone so many facelifts that it is virtually impossible to recognize the country for what it once was.
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What can Chinese cities learn from Singapore?

What can Chinese cities learn from Singapore? | Classroom geography | Scoop.it
Last week, I had the opportunity to attend the Singapore Urban Week along with other colleagues from the World Bank Beijing office, as well as delegates from China’s national government and participating cities. For all of us, this trip to Singapore was an eye-opening experience that highlighted the essential role of integrated urban planning in building sustainable cities, and provided practical solutions that can be readily adapted to help achieve each city’s own development vision. A couple of key lessons learned:
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How to teach ... the Himalayas

How to teach ... the Himalayas | Classroom geography | Scoop.it
From how mountains are formed to discussions about the ‘fatal attraction’ of Everest, our lesson resources will help you scale new heights with your students
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Jerry Mitrovica - Why Our Intuition About Sea-Level Rise Is Wrong

Jerry Mitrovica - Why Our Intuition About Sea-Level Rise Is Wrong | Classroom geography | Scoop.it
If you’re living on the U.S. east coast, or Holland, you don’t need to worry what global average sea-level rise is doing. I was in Holland a few summers ago and was trying to convince the Dutch that if the Greenland ice sheet melts, they have less to worry about than the Antarctic ice sheet melting. But it doesn’t register. When I give public talks, people just shake their heads. They don’t believe it when I show this bull’s-eye around the melting [Greenland] ice sheet, which is an area where sea level will fall. Our intuition is built from walking along a shoreline or turning a tap on. It isn’t from considering what would happen if a major large-scale ice sheet melts.
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Meandering Stream Time Lapse


Via Seth Dixon
Mathijs Booden's insight:

This is such a tangible way of showing things that seem abstract on a static map.

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, November 13, 2014 2:06 PM

This is a fantastic way to visualize physical geographic processes. 


Tags physical, fluvial, geomorphology, erosion, landscape.

Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 25, 2014 1:24 PM

El Sire Reserve in Peru is a river that has been monitored over the last 28 years. Every time I watch this short 6 second clip, I learn something different about how this river has changed. On the bottom of the screen, just past half way, the river just takes a huge short cut and cuts over and connects to a different part of the same river. This happens on the whole river too. there are 8 or 9 huge bends and curves in the river but by the end in 2012 there are only about 3 to 4 bends and curves. For some reason the water is taking short cuts and just leaving the spaces where the water used to run through and leaving it dry.  

Pieter de Paauw's curator insight, February 15, 6:28 AM

Een natuurlijk meanderende rivier

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xkcd: Map Projections

xkcd: Map Projections | Classroom geography | Scoop.it
Mathijs Booden's insight:
Torn between Robinson and Hodo-Dyer.
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GIFs Show Nepal's Slow Recovery One Year After Earthquakes

Two earthquakes rattled the country within three weeks of each other in 2015, killing 9,000 people and demolishing over half a million houses.
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18 maps that explain maritime security in Asia

18 maps that explain maritime security in Asia | Classroom geography | Scoop.it
Browse the Asia Maritime Transparency Initiative atlas for original maps that explain maritime security in Asia.
Mathijs Booden's insight:
My one gripe is that the population choropleth map is done the wrong way, coloring countries based on absolute numbers.
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Drone footage - The Himalayas from 20,000 ft.

The aerial cinema experts at Teton Gravity Research release the first ultra HD footage of the Himalayas shot from above 20,000 ft. with the GSS C520 system, the…
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The open, universal internet is over. But did it ever really exist?

The open, universal internet is over. But did it ever really exist? | Classroom geography | Scoop.it

The internet is being nationalised. A French regulator’s recent insistence that a French citizen has a right to have information removed from the totality of cyberspace – according to the right to be forgotten judgment – is just another instance of a general trend toward what China’s president, Xi Jinping, calls “internet sovereignty”. For which read: assertion of control by the nation-state over the once borderless realm. In some cases, internet sovereignty can mean a state protecting its citizens’ privacy against international corporate surveillance or infiltration by another state. In other cases, it can mean the state ensuring that it can invade the privacy of its citizens whenever and however it likes. The choices made depend on the state, but that of course is the point: it’s the state that decides. Was this inevitable? Perhaps. Computing, and much later the internet, originated in state-run projects and were shaped by the state’s needs. What’s more, the commercial internet, to the considerable degree that it was dependent on advertising income and other forms of retailing, also always had a “localising” logic behind its vast scale. In truth, the globalised web utopia seems to have depended, however much one might prefer otherwise, on an American dominance that could not last forever. As other states assert their own diverse prerogatives, what will remain of the open, extraterrestrial realm that fired so many imaginations?

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China is the only emerging market that matters

China is the only emerging market that matters | Classroom geography | Scoop.it
There's no such thing as the BRICs. There's only C--as in China.
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Video - the mudflow from the Samarco tailings dam failure

Em um vídeo inédito postado por uma das testemunhas da tragédia em uma rede social é possível ver a força da avalanche marrom que desceu montanhas
Mathijs Booden's insight:
See http://blogs.agu.org/landslideblog/2016/03/27/samarco-tailings-dam-failure-1/ for an analysis.
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Ending extreme poverty in the hardest places | World Vision Blog

Ending extreme poverty in the hardest places | World Vision Blog | Classroom geography | Scoop.it
The UN’s newly minted Sustainable Development Goals have codified a commitment by world leaders to achieve one of the most monumental tasks in human history: the eradication of extreme poverty by 2030. The case for eradication within 15 years has been made on the back of dramatic decreases over the last two decades, which have resulted in the halving of extreme poverty. The “last mile” to eliminate the remaining half of people living at $1.90 per day[1] or less seems daunting but achievable to many. President Obama has declared this task within striking distance and an objective of U.S. foreign policy in no less than three State of the Union addresses. While the goal of eradication by 2030 is the right one, the international community must foremost recognize that ending extreme poverty at the “last mile” is going to be profoundly more challenging and complex than the road already traveled. We cannot do more of the same, even at an accelerated pace, and expect the remaining bastions of extreme poverty to yield. This is because extreme poverty is becoming more highly concentrated in the world’s most difficult places, the places with weak governance and public institutions, low skilled workforces, limited private sector and civil society engagement, and vulnerabilities to myriad threats—from conflict, corruption, and climate to urbanization, pandemics, and natural disasters. “Fragile states,” a catchall term for the most vulnerable and poorly governed contexts, are estimated to be the home of over 80% of the world’s extreme poor by 2030. - See more at: http://blog.worldvision.org/content/ending-extreme-poverty-hardest-places#sthash.NKNmgwZr.dpuf
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The flipper bridge

The flipper bridge | Classroom geography | Scoop.it
In Hong Kong, cars drive on the left while in the rest of China, they drive on the right. If you're building a bridge between the
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Video - Debris avalanche in Argentina

Alud en el trayecto que une Horcones (entrada del parque) y Confluencia (primer campo base del Aconcagua). Julián Insarralde, Nico Agüero y Naco Choulet trab...
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Running deer: for every 100 girls, 111 boys are born in Vietnam

Running deer: for every 100 girls, 111 boys are born in Vietnam | Classroom geography | Scoop.it
A draft population law looks ill-considered and discriminatory
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