Classroom Discipline
Follow
Find
24 views | +0 today
Rescooped by JennaMRyan from Digital Delights
onto Classroom Discipline
Scoop.it!

5 Guiding Principles for Effective School-Wide Discipline

5 Guiding Principles for Effective School-Wide Discipline | Classroom Discipline | Scoop.it
Something I have come to know is that effective schools take a thoughtful approach to student discipline. Admittedly, there are some who believe student behaviour will take care of itself; that we'...

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
JennaMRyan's insight:

Tom Schimmer shares five guiding principles for Effective School-Wide Discipline in his article posted February 7, 2013.  He starts out by stating that effective schools take a thoughtful approach to student discipline.  He says increasing overall level of student engagement will reduce negative behaviors.  The principles are as follows:

1. Every school-wide discipline plan is designed to be an instrument of support and inclusion, not removal and isolation.

2. Be clear about expected behaviors and what success can/should look like.

3. Be reasonable, consistent, and air when responding to inappropriate behaviors.

4. Pre-correct for anticipated behavioral errors.

5. Respect the uniqueness of each student, each incident, and each set of circumstances.

 

I really wanted to include this article because discipline in the schools is not limited to just the classroom.  The culture of the schools sets the tone for the way students and teachers act.  I appreciate how the said schools have to be thoughtful about how they approach discipline.  As soon as discipline becomes an after thought, students will get reckless.  Principles four and five stood out the most to me.  I think good schools anticipate when bad behavior might occur, not because they think their student are bad but simply through years of experience dealing with such things.  Pre-correcting or letting the student know that this is not the expectations and spelling out the consequences is a great way to minimize bad behavior in one fell swoop.  The fifth concept of uniqueness is really important to me.  Each child is different and there is never a one size fits all discipline policy and procedure.  Circumstances and motivation are always different and each incident should be considered individually.  It's important to have the school wide discipline policies act as support and aid to the teachers’ policies in the classroom, I feel they should never be in conflict.  This was my only curated sources that dealt with school-wide discipline, but I think some of the other principles outlined in the other items curated would work on a school wide level, too.

more...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by JennaMRyan
Scoop.it!

Discipline Is the Problem, Not the Solution

articles by alfie kohn
JennaMRyan's insight:

This article was written by Alfie Kohn for Learning Magazine in 1995.  His position is that teachers ask themselves the wrong questions and try to address the wrong problems when looking at student behavior.  Rather than asking himself or herself how do I get this kid to settle down and work, but what’s the task that's not engaging him?  Another area is when students demonstrate undesired behavior, teachers should reflect on the climate of the classroom they have helped to create.  Another way to discipline students that Kohn supports is engaging the students in the thinking for themselves by asking the children to think to themselves how long it takes them to get settled, why, and what we can do about that.  Kohn says the whole field of classroom management only amounts to various techniques for manipulating student behavior.

 

I am intrigued by Kohn's perspective.  His article isn't exactly opposed to discipline, rather he suggests the most effective way to get students to display desired behavior is to help them think through when they should act a certain way.  When the children think their behavior is their idea for the good of the classroom, they are more likely to comply.  I am just getting into discipline strategies and ideology of classroom discipline, so I can't speak to best practice for discipline, but I feel, in general, discipline has to be very individualized.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by JennaMRyan
Scoop.it!

How To Maintain Classroom Discipline - Good And Bad Methods Training Educational Video

Maintaining Classroom Discipline (1947). Good and bad methods of disciplining inappropriate classsroom behavior. This was a very well made instructional movi...
JennaMRyan's insight:

This video about Maintaining Classroom Discipline was created in 1947.  The teacher in videoed made general statements that are very discouraging to the whole class.  He says many of them will have the "pleasure" of repeating the class next semester.  When he stepped out of the room he instructed the students to open their books and they showed a student mocking the teacher once he's left the room.  He's making an example out of a troublemaker by sending him to the principal's office.  He gave the whole class detention making them stay for 45 minutes after class.  The narrator goes back through the scene explaining what was done poorly and what he should have done differently.They played a difficult scenario a teacher might face and how he handled it poorly, then the narrator talks through the difficult things, and then they end with a better way to do it. 

 

I wanted to include a dated resources to show not only up and coming current discipline practice in the classroom, but also where we've come from and what has or hasn't worked in the past.  I couldn't believe he could demand the student’s stay after class an extra 45 minutes.  Today kids go to work and have sports but he was allowed to do it several years ago.  I think this type of video is a really interesting way to help train teachers.   I appreciated how they showed the teacher using better strategies and connecting to the students by using examples from their real life to help them understand the content rather than chastising them.  While I think the video is rather cheesy, it was probably an excellent teaching method back in the day.  I feel someone could model a teacher training video after the style they used here.  You can teach a lot more effectively using nonscripted real life scenarios

more...
nicole jennings's curator insight, March 31, 1:56 PM

Although this video is old, it has a great message. It shows the difference between being a strict disciplinarian and being a good teacher that is able to see a problem and realize they may be the cause. When the teacher is able to take accountability for poor grades, he is able to really help the students understand what they seemed to be confused about. Having a more friendly attitude has a more positive effect on students and makes them act out less.

Scooped by JennaMRyan
Scoop.it!

Set Up Rules and Routines

Set Up Rules and Routines | Classroom Discipline | Scoop.it
Rules and routines keep your class running smoothly so that you have more time for teaching academics. Here are some ideas for establishing, using, and reinforcing rules and routines.
JennaMRyan's insight:

In order to keep your class running smoothly, you need to establish rules and routines.  This article takes the point of view that rules need to be established and enforced.  Different ways to do this that are suggested are involving the class in making the rules, keeping them short, phrase them in a positive way, post rules and go over them, and change a rule if it doesn’t work.  The other main aspect of this article is establishing routines so that you can save large amounts of time.  Routines include things such as passing papers, leaving to go to the restroom, sharpening pencils, and dismissing the class. 

 

I found that these routines are extremely helpful and really do save you time.  In my placement, I was able to experience this first hand.  My cooperating teacher at my field placement had established routines in the classroom and all she would have to do is say one word and the kids would know what to do and it really did make the classroom run a whole lot smoother.  I appreciated the suggestions for posting rules and enforcing them and I think this is good only to an extent.  While rules can outline the expectations for the classroom, they don't do any good when not enforced properly.  Kids have to buy in and grab hold to the vision of the classroom climate that following the rules will set.

more...
nicole jennings's curator insight, March 31, 2:11 PM

I believe this to be a great help in setting up expectations for the classroom at the beginning of the school year. It guidelines ways to get students involved in setting up practicle rules and routines to follow throughout the year.

Scooped by JennaMRyan
Scoop.it!

Classroom Management and Discipline

This section covers all the major discipline strategies for teachers. Assertive Discipline, Reality Therapy, Discipline with Dignity, and Transactional Analysis are some of the theories that are covered.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by JennaMRyan
Scoop.it!

Managing Student Conduct - Successfully Managing Student Conduct

Managing Student Conduct - Successfully Managing Student Conduct | Classroom Discipline | Scoop.it
Managing student conduct can seem scary, especially to newer teachers. However, it is one of the main tasks teachers have in order to maintain an academic classroom environment.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by JennaMRyan from Positive Behavior Intervention & Supports: Oakland County
Scoop.it!

Should I use a class-wide reward system?

Should I use a class-wide reward system? | Classroom Discipline | Scoop.it

Reward systems have generated a great deal of controversy.  They may not be needed if:  the teacher is seasoned; the classroom management, discipline and organization plan is “tight”; most of the kids do well most of the time.  If this is NOT the case, a system for acknowledging the RIGHT behaviors may be warranted. 

 

It is advised, however, that teachers using a class-wide system consider FIRST looking at the relationships they have formed with the individuals; second, review   the classroom management, discipline and organization plan.  Fixing the real problem will be needed sooner or later if things are going to get better. 


Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by JennaMRyan from Teaching & Learning Resources
Scoop.it!

40 Classroom Management and Discipline Worksheets

40 Classroom Management and Discipline Worksheets | Classroom Discipline | Scoop.it
Free Classroom Management and Discipline worksheets to keep your students focused! Being able to manage your classroom and discipline students is part of being an effective teacher.

Via Pilar Pamblanco
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by JennaMRyan from Ed Tech Chatter
Scoop.it!

Positive Discipline Strategies Yield Quick Results

Positive Discipline Strategies Yield Quick Results | Classroom Discipline | Scoop.it
Positive Discipline Strategies Yield Quick Results ([Video Break] Watch how positive discipline strategies yield quick results: http://t.co/jeOSNYgnd4 #classroom #behavior)...

Via Jon Samuelson
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by JennaMRyan
Scoop.it!

Getting Tough on Classroom Discipline

Getting Tough on Classroom Discipline | Classroom Discipline | Scoop.it
The petty classroom annoyances that were almost charming little obstacles to be overcome in early September now seem to be huge hurdles as discouraged teachers wonder if we will ever make the kind of profound changes in our students that we dreamed...
JennaMRyan's insight:

This is a six-part article on getting tough on classroom discipline.  The articles include an introductory page, moving toward self-discipline, teaching student how to monitor themselves, questions that can encourage self-discipline, focused on student strengths, and simple activities to boost self-esteem.  This resources supports self discipline saying to teachers that when students can monitor themselves, you no longer have to assume the role of the overbearing adult in the classroom.  Some suggestions for encouraging self-discipline are paying your students compliments, make eye contact, have students share hidden talents, set goals, ask for student advice, and use your class's personality for debate and discussion.  Finally, this article offers suggestions to improve self-esteem such as taking pictures and making a wall of fame.

 

I like that this resource on discipline talks more about how to create a positive classroom atmosphere and improve students' self esteem rather than strategies for how to come down on them.  I love the suggestions for discussions to have with your students to involve them in creating the environment of the classroom and I liked the suggestions for things I can actually do as positive behavior intervention strategies.  I feel like this resource connects to Alfie Kohn's ideas because it also says the best way to discipline kids is to let them do the disciplining and ask them guiding questions so they can come to the solution on their own.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by JennaMRyan
Scoop.it!

The Classroom Discipline Blog

The Classroom Discipline Blog keeps you up to date with all the additions and changes to the teaching-strategies-for-classroom-discipline.com Web site. Subscribe here.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by JennaMRyan
Scoop.it!

Positive Classroom Discipline - Chapter 18, Discipline Management as an Integrated System

Discipline, Tools for Teaching, positive discipline, classroom management, staff development, professional development, new teacher training, Title One, new teacher induction, teacher training, effective teaching, teacher workshops, no child left ...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by JennaMRyan
Scoop.it!

Discipline by Design

Discipline by Design | Classroom Discipline | Scoop.it
JennaMRyan's insight:

This article is presented by Discipline by Design and it gives 11 Techniques for Better Classroom Discipline.  The following are the techniques they suggest: focusing, direct instruction, monitoring, modeling, non-verbal cuing, environmental control, low-profile intervention, low-profile intervention, assertive discipline, assertive I-Messages, humanistic I-messages, and positive discipline.  This article says you should wait until you have the students’ attention before you start giving any instruction setting the tone that you expect silence and attention when you are speaking.  Good teachers circulate the room and know what is going on in the class. Modeling the behavior they want to see means that if you want your students to speak quietly, then you need to also.  The environmental control aspect of this article directly correlates to the classroom culture content I curated.

 

I found that this article summarizes a happy medium I found in several resources.  It suggests teachers need to set good guidelines, rules, and expectations while letting the students take ownership of their classroom and set the tone themselves.  I was taught to use I-messages in schools and this article takes them a step further by including information about assertive and humanistic I-messages.  I will definitely encourage my students to use I-messages in my future classroom to keep a lot of the internal conflict to a minimum.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by JennaMRyan from Professional Learning for Busy Educators
Scoop.it!

Class Tech Tips: Picture Perfect Behavior

Class Tech Tips: Picture Perfect Behavior | Classroom Discipline | Scoop.it
There are lots of ways to create a classroom culture that rewards positive behavior. I love using the camera on my iPad to record "Picture Perfect" behavior. When I'm ready to start a lesson I want...

Via John Evans
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by JennaMRyan from Engagement Based Teaching and Learning
Scoop.it!

Treasured Tip - CHAMPS Classroom Organizaion, Discipline, Management

Treasured Tip - CHAMPS Classroom Organizaion, Discipline, Management | Classroom Discipline | Scoop.it

A 4th grade teacher's blog regarding her experience with CHAMPS for classroom management, discipline and organization.  CHAMPS is by Randy Sprick's Safe and Civil Schools.  It incorporates best practices in a framework that guides while allowing teachers to individualize to their classroom.  Teachers leave with a succinct classroom management plan . 

 

Engaging kids can't happen without the fundamentals of a well oiled machine!


Via Mary Perfitt-Nelson
JennaMRyan's insight:

This Teacher's Treasure blog was posted October 30, 2011.  It features a book called CHAMPS Classroom Management.  CHAMPS stands for Conversation, Help, Activity Movement, Participation, and Success.  The book also features the acronym SLANT which stands for Sit Up, Learn forward, Activate your thinking, Note important information, and Track the talker (or the Teacher).   The article asks teaches to teach their expectations regarding how to be successful within the structure that they have created.  Correcting misbehavior fluently is another main point in the article.  The blogger also concluded it seemed high maintenance and tough to keep up with on a daily basis.

 

According to the suggestions in this blog, good teachers are involved.  This is consistent with the discipline policies outlined in my other posts.  Although the book outlines this in more detail, teachers can develop an effective classroom plan that is proactive, positive, and instructional.  I like the concept of CHAMPS because it seems to me like they are all very obvious components of good classroom management, but when you speak them and have the kids speak them, they take ownership over them and it becomes a concrete expectation, in my opinion.  I think the strategies outlined in this book, especially SLANT will give a classroom the edge over others because these principles really encourage actively engaging the students; minds and bodies.  I am not totally sold on it because it does seem like a lot to keep up with, but I can see introducing it around December into the classroom once it starts getting excited about Christmas time coming up and seeing if the strategies are effective for classroom management.

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by JennaMRyan from Teaching & Learning Resources
Scoop.it!

Classroom Discipline Resources

Many teachers, especially new teachers, struggle with classroom discipline. Here are great techniques and resources to help educators out with classroom management.

Via Pilar Pamblanco
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by JennaMRyan from Digital Delights
Scoop.it!

5 Guiding Principles for Effective School-Wide Discipline

5 Guiding Principles for Effective School-Wide Discipline | Classroom Discipline | Scoop.it
Something I have come to know is that effective schools take a thoughtful approach to student discipline. Admittedly, there are some who believe student behaviour will take care of itself; that we'...

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
JennaMRyan's insight:

Tom Schimmer shares five guiding principles for Effective School-Wide Discipline in his article posted February 7, 2013.  He starts out by stating that effective schools take a thoughtful approach to student discipline.  He says increasing overall level of student engagement will reduce negative behaviors.  The principles are as follows:

1. Every school-wide discipline plan is designed to be an instrument of support and inclusion, not removal and isolation.

2. Be clear about expected behaviors and what success can/should look like.

3. Be reasonable, consistent, and air when responding to inappropriate behaviors.

4. Pre-correct for anticipated behavioral errors.

5. Respect the uniqueness of each student, each incident, and each set of circumstances.

 

I really wanted to include this article because discipline in the schools is not limited to just the classroom.  The culture of the schools sets the tone for the way students and teachers act.  I appreciate how the said schools have to be thoughtful about how they approach discipline.  As soon as discipline becomes an after thought, students will get reckless.  Principles four and five stood out the most to me.  I think good schools anticipate when bad behavior might occur, not because they think their student are bad but simply through years of experience dealing with such things.  Pre-correcting or letting the student know that this is not the expectations and spelling out the consequences is a great way to minimize bad behavior in one fell swoop.  The fifth concept of uniqueness is really important to me.  Each child is different and there is never a one size fits all discipline policy and procedure.  Circumstances and motivation are always different and each incident should be considered individually.  It's important to have the school wide discipline policies act as support and aid to the teachers’ policies in the classroom, I feel they should never be in conflict.  This was my only curated sources that dealt with school-wide discipline, but I think some of the other principles outlined in the other items curated would work on a school wide level, too.

more...