Classical Hollywood Cinema xxx
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YouTube - Walt Disney's MultiPlane Camera (Filmed: Feb. 13, 1957)

Animation had it's place in entertainment for quite sometime in the early 1900's. Cartoon series started to be released regularly from independent animation units. But an independent company stood out the most in 1928 with America's favorite cartoon character Mickey Mouse. Other famous characters were added at this time such as Pluto, Donald Duck, and Goofy. During this era, sound and symphonies made these cartoons popular and entertaining.
During the mid 1900's, animation started improving a bit more for a multiplane camera was being used to create a much more clearer background. This type of camera allowed the settings and figures to be seperated into several cels in layers. It used stacked planes of glass in which different elements of a cell animation had been painted on. Therefore, an animator can easily use the same background or any other elemnets that are not in motion. In certain Disney classic movies such as Snow White, Bambi, and Pinocchio, you can see that a multiplane camera had been used to create a more realistic background.
The clip above above shows Walt Disney explaining how a multiplane camera works and how animation comes to life.
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End of Hollywood Classic Style

Classic Hollywood Style Cinema transitioned into Hollywood Spectales but declined more and more as a style due to censorship and the end of the studio systems. The government viewed the studios vertical integration as monopoly. 


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YouTube - Fresh Prince of Bel Air: "Rocky" Will Smith

This example of a montage clip from the 90s shows how Hollywood cinema has developed and still continues to achieve audience attention.
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Characteristics of Classical Hollywood Cinema

     

 

          Editing and Continuity

 

       - Filmmakers in Classic Hollywood Cinema wanted to captivate the audience, without them being sidetracked by the editing. This type of shooting and editing was called Continuity

 

 

 

     1. Classic Hollywood Style Editing


- Filmmakers in Classic Hollywood Cinema were obsessed with trying to make a cut look invisible. They would achieve invisible cuts by using shot to reverse shot, or by matching eye lines.

               

                   * the 180º rule ( Gazing -----> <----- Gazing)

 

 

 


     2. Classic Hollywood Style Shooting

 

- With the use of Continuity, there were a few different types of Shooting techniques. The film should have a coherent story line, and time should appear unified, continuous and linear.

 

 

 

      

     3. Classic Hollywood Style Narrative

 

-Utilizing actors, events, causal effects, main points and secondary points are basic characteristics of this type of narrative. The characters in Classical Hollywood Cinema have clearly definable traits, are active, and very goal oriented. They are causal agents motivated by psychological rather than social concerns.

 

 

 

 

  Establishing shot

 

       -Establishing the context for a scene by showing the relationship between its important figures and objects.

 

 

 

  Re-establishing shots

 

       -Positioning the character(s) within the environment of the scene, helping to re-establish character and/or setting: also used as a transitional device.

 

 

 

  Cut-ins

 

       -Inserting and interrupting the action.

 

 

 

  Screen direction

 

       -Involving the direction that actors or objects appear to be moving on the screen from the point of view of the camera or audience.

 

 

 

  Eyeline matches

 

       -The audience will want to see what the character on-screen is seeing.

 

 

 

  Shot/Reverse Shot

 

       -One character is shown looking at another character (often off-screen), and then the other character is shown looking back at the first character.

 

 

 

  Crosscutting

 

       -Establishing action occurring at the same time in two different locations.

 

 

 

 

                 Etc. Characteristics   (Focusing Actors, Happy Endings)

 

 

 

 

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Group October 8th's comment, October 15, 2012 6:00 PM
http://youtu.be/LEJdUGd0apw
Group October 8th's comment, October 15, 2012 6:00 PM
http://youtu.be/LEJdUGd0apw
Group October 8th's comment, October 15, 2012 6:00 PM
http://youtu.be/LEJdUGd0apw
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The 25 Best Movie Remakes of All Time

The 25 Best Movie Remakes of All Time | Classical Hollywood Cinema xxx | Scoop.it
Let's face it, Hollywood is full of unoriginal ideas; just look at the disproportionate number of films based on books, plays, TV shows and even Broadway...
Based On: Howard Hawks' gangland drama, 'Scarface' (1932)
Brian De Palma's remake is a cultural phenomenon -- the kind of movie that nearly 30 years later is still regularly referenced. The genius behind De Palma and screenwriter Oliver Stone's update is switching from the Italian mob to the Cuban cartels in Miami's cocaine-fueled drug boom. Al Pacino's machine-gun-wielding kingpin Tony Montana is as iconic as Michael Corleone, with even more quotable lines, like, "Say hello to my little friend," or "In this country, you gotta make the money first..."

1. 'The Thing' (1982)
Based On: Howard Hawks' 'The Thing' (1952)
Considering this list could've been comprised solely of horror films -- there are just that many remakes 1. A known master of paranoia and suspense, Carpenter's take on a parasitic alien that can shape-shift into any thing or any body is both bloody disgusting and bloody brilliant. Never has working in a remote outpost seemed scarier, and never has an awesomely bearded Kurt Russell been this good.
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CHC as a style by jhroberts

Driving claim regarding the dominant aesthetic of classical Hollywood cinema 1920s-1960s (CHC), a style we're calling "the invisible style": CHC worked to hide a film's artistic elements in favor of foregrounding the film's story.
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CHC and the Invisible Style

Invisible Style:
the systematic subordination of every cinematic element to the interests of a movie’s narrative.

Thus:
•lighting was unobtrusive
•camera angles predominantly eye level
•framing centered
•cuts occur at logical points in action and dialogue.
That is, style was subordinate to story. Conscious style was effaced.

CHC’s components of the invisible style gathered around cinema’s two fundamental means: mise-en-scene and editing. 

Spatial and temporal continuity and clip from Maltese Falcon
Some continuity rules that these serve this style:
•establishing shot, re-establishing shots, cut-ins, screen direction, eyeline matches, Shot/Reverse Shot, crosscutting
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Best Movies of the 1920s

Best Movies of the 1920s | Classical Hollywood Cinema xxx | Scoop.it
1. http://movies.toptenreviews.com/reviews/mr200646.htm
2. http://movies.toptenreviews.com/reviews/mr299408.htm
3. http://movies.toptenreviews.com/reviews/mr179012.htm
4. http://movies.toptenreviews.com/reviews/mr218157.htm
5. http://movies.toptenreviews.com/reviews/mr342160.htm
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Joan Fontaine - Beautiful Classic Actressof the 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s

Joan Fontaine - Beautiful Classic Actressof the 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s | Classical Hollywood Cinema xxx | Scoop.it
Glamour Girls - The private lives and times of some of the most glamorous actresses and starlets of the Twneties, Thirties, Forties, and Fifties.
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Camera Movement

Camera Movement | Classical Hollywood Cinema xxx | Scoop.it

Many early filmmakers had to shoot silent films and add sound later, in order to move the camera around as often as they did. Moving shots often stood out from the rest of the film and were shot with multiple cameras. These methods were not complimentary with continuity. Camera blimps started gaining popularity in the film arena, but a new complication arose. The cameras that were being used were far too heavy for the traditional tripods, so it was difficult to move the camera. These issues paved the way for the further development of dollies and cranes that began to be used at the end of the silent era.


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Casablanca - Technique example

From www.prefixmag.com - Today, 5:26 PM
The single most important and most influential element of cinematic form that characterizes classical Hollywood cinema is continuity editing. The most important goal of continuity editing is to make the cut invisible. This is achieved by devices such as the shot / reverse-shot or the eye line match. The editing is subservient to the flow of the narrative and is usually constructed in a way that it does not draw attention onto itself. Time in classical Hollywood is continuous. Usually the only manipulation of time allowed in classical films is a flashback, which serve as a purpose to introduce a memory sequence of a character-for example Casablanca.As for the concept of space, classical Hollywood films strives to overcome of conceals the two dimensionality of film and is strongly centered upon the human body. Majority of shots focuses on gestures or facial expressions. There seem to be a typical or fixed narrative style classical Hollywood film's introduction, middle (climax) and conclusion which generally has a distinct resolution at the end
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YouTube - Sergeant York "Over the Top" Battle Scene

This movie is a great example of a Classical Hollywood film because the main characters internal conflict, wonderfully relayed by the actor's intense acting, not only spills into the story but is the very engine that powers it.
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Main components of Hollywood Cinema

1.Action that appear continuous
2. Scenes that occur at different places but at the same time
3. Creates tension , anxiety etc.
4. Introduction of the problem in the beginning of movie
5. Problem solved at the end of the film
- montages , enter cutting , the 180 rule
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Film of the 1920s: The Pre-talkies and the Silent Era

Film of the 1920s: The Pre-talkies and the Silent Era | Classical Hollywood Cinema xxx | Scoop.it
The Birth of the Talkies:

By the late 1920s, the art of silent film had become remarkably mature. Although called silents, they were never really silent but accompanied by sound organs, gramophone discs, musicians, sound effects specialists, live actors who delivered dialogue, and even full-scale orchestras. There would be two competing sound or recording systems developed during the early 'talkie' period: sound-on-disc, and sound-on-film.

In 1925-26, America technologically revolutionized the entire industry, with the formation of the Vitaphone Company (a subsidiary created by Warner Bros. and Western Electric). Warner Bros. launched sound and talking pictures, with Bell Telephone Laboratory researchers, by developing a revolutionary synchronized sound system called Vitaphone (a short-lived sound-on-disc process developed in 1925 that quickly became obsolete by 1931). This was Warner Bros.' romantic swashbuckler adventure Don Juan (1926). The prestigious production was premiered in New York on August 6, 1926, and starred John Barrymore (nicknamed "The Great Profile") as the hand-kissing womanizer (the number of kisses in the film set a record). Director Alan Crosland's expensive film failed to create the sensation that Warners had hoped for. The second Vitaphone production was The Better 'Ole (1926), featuring musical comedy and recording star Al Jolson, among others.

Most of the studios started to convert from silent to sound film production - a tremendous capital investment. It added a 'soundtrack' directly onto the strip of film and would eventually become the predominant sound technology. [This system would soon replace the inflexible Vitaphone system because it was easier to synchronize the sound.]

The first feature film released using the new Fox Movietone system was Sunrise (1927), directed by F. W. Murnau -- the first professionally-produced feature film with an actual soundtrack. . The first talking picture made in Hollywood was a Fox-Movietone 5-minute short titled They're Coming to Get Me (1927).
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Technique

Here is a short reading that describes the techniques associated with Classic Hollywood Cinema.
-Continuous Editing
-Unification of time and space
-Clear beginning, middle, and end

Nigel and the Dees (continuous edit)
andrewjmorin
2 years ago
Classic Hollywood cinema was built off the concept of continuity editing, sometimes called the invisible style, because attention is never drawn to the camera nor sound equipment, helping the film to flow. While watching the clip no matter what is being shown in front of the camera it is never seen by the viewer, it is made as if the action was happening live in front of them.
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Classic Hollywood Musicals (MGM)

Classic Hollywood Musicals (MGM) | Classical Hollywood Cinema xxx | Scoop.it
I was at Borders, thinking about music of the 1930's and 1940's with Hollywood musicals in mind in particular after a visit to a skilled nursing facility. (My mother was a resident there until late 2006, and I was thinking of her "old as the hills" music that she used to speak of.) Looking for music of World War II (Glenn Miller, Artie Shaw, Jo Stafford, etc.) I came across a two CD set of soundtrack music from Hollywood musicals. Just looking at the track listings brought back a technicolor wave of nostalgia and images from old TV movies. The effect was even more powerful at the SNF later that evening, and brightened the atmosphere at what could be an otherwise bleak place.Gene Kelly's "Singin' in the Rain" opens disk one, then the musical craft is discussed in "There's No Business Like Show Business," "S' Wonderful," and "That's Entertainment!" It's enough to make one seek out Turner Classic Movies, TBS, or TNT, to see Judy Garland, Ann Blyth, Bing Crosby, Fred Astaire, Clark Gable (!), and Howard Keel in full voice. Even if you don't like this material, I'm sure that the grandparents wouldn't mind "Puttin' On The Ritz" with Clark Gable. Disk two opens with "Over The Rainbow," sung by Judy Garland ("The Wizard of Oz") and continues with standards like "It's A Most Unusual Day," "I Got Rhythm," "The Lady is a Tramp," "Cheek to Cheek," and "Let's Face The Music and Dance." Note: This CD set is also known as "Musical Wonderland"
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Lighting technology and film style - Lighting - actor, actress, show, tv, director, name, cinema, scene, role, book

The lighting techniques used in the early cinema of the late 1890s and the first years of the twentieth century were astonishingly primitive in comparison with those used in still photography. Filmmakers of that era did not adopt the range of artificial lighting that was already standard equipment in photographic studios and widely used by photographers to enhance the aesthetic appearance of their work. Instead, filmmakers relied almost entirely on bright daylight. For this reason, when films were not shot on location they were filmed on rooftop sets, or else in studios built with either an open air design or a glass roof. Thomas Edison's famous Black Maria studio, built in 1892, was based on a rotating structure that allowed its glass roof to be maneuvered to follow the direct sunlight. A greenhouse-like studio built by the French filmmaker Georges Méliès (1861–1938) in 1897 that featured both glazed roof and walls and a series of retractable blinds proved to be an influential model for the design of later studios. The availability of many hours of bright sunlight was so important to early filmmakers that it has often been cited as one of the reasons that the American film industry shifted its base from New York to California (although other reasons, such as the wide range of landscapes California could offer for location shooting, also were important).

Read more: Lighting technology and film style - Lighting - actor, actress, show, tv, director, name, cinema, scene, role, book http://www.filmreference.com/encyclopedia/Independent-Film-Road-Movies/Lighting-LIGHTING-TECHNOLOGY-AND-FILM-STYLE.html#ixzz29O8byCVW
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Montgomery Clift

Montgomery Clift | Classical Hollywood Cinema xxx | Scoop.it
Entering the 1950s, Clift was one of the most sought-after leading men in Hollywood; his only direct competitor was Marlon Brando. At one point he was receiving so many offers of roles that friends had to squeeze past stacks of them in order to walk up the stairs. According to Elizabeth Taylor (as quoted in Patricia Bosworth's biography of Clift), "Monty could've been the biggest star in the world if he did more movies." Clift was notoriously picky with his projects. His next movie, A Place in the Sun (1951), is one of his iconic roles. The studio paired up two of the biggest young stars in Hollywood at the time (Clift and Elizabeth Taylor) in what was expected to be a blockbuster that would capitalize on their sex symbol status.
Clift's performance in the movie is regarded as one of the signature method acting performances. He worked extensively on his character and was again nominated for an Academy Award for Best Actor. For his character's scenes in jail, Clift spent a night in a real state prison. He also refused to go along with the director George Stevens' suggestion that he do "something amazing" on his character's walk to the electric chair. Instead, he walked to his death with a natural, depressed facial expression. His main acting rival, Marlon Brando, was so moved by Clift's performance, that he voted for Clift to win the Academy Award for Best Actor, and was sure that he would win. That year Clift voted for Brando in A Streetcar Named Desire. The movie was critically acclaimed and Charlie Chaplin called it "the greatest movie made about America." The movie received added media attention due to the rumors that Clift and Taylor were dating in real life. They were billed as "the most beautiful couple in Hollywood." Many critics still call Clift and Taylor "the most beautiful Hollywood movie couple of all time."
Clift's next movie was Alfred Hitchcock's I Confess. True to his method, Clift temporarily lived in a Catholic church and studied priests. The movie was a box office failure due to the controversy over Clift's character (a Catholic priest)'s being romantically involved with a woman.
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YouTube - Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1920) [Silent Movie] [Horror]

"Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" is a 1920 horror silent film, produced by Famous Players-Lasky and released through Paramount/Artcraft. The film is based upon Robert Louis Stevenson's novella "The Strange Case of Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde" and starring actor John Barrymore. The film was directed by John S. Robertson and co-starred Nita Naldi. The scenario was by Clara Beranger.

This story of split personality, has Dr. Jekyll a kind and charitable man who believes that everyone has two sides, one good and one evil. Using a potion, his personalities are split, creating havoc.

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Directed by John S. Robertson, produced by Adolph Zukor, written by Thomas Russell Sullivan, Clara Beranger and Robert Louis Stevenson (novel), starring John Barrymore, Martha Mansfield, Charles Lane and Nita Naldi.
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