Classic Hollywood 1900's
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Hollywood Innovations

Hollywood Innovations | Classic Hollywood 1900's | Scoop.it
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Many new innovations came about during this era. Sound was being used to create space such as in the film "I Am A Fugitive From The Chain Gang". This was possible because of the unidirectional microphone. They also had Technicolor in an attempt to bring more people into the cinemas. They had special effects such as rear projection optical printing. Camera movement also played a big part. With Dolly and Crane shots, movies could be filmed back and forth, side to side, and up and down. 

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Comedy Films 1936: Modern Times

UPDATE: Full/High Quality Version: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wGNYyG8F7WY&list=UUuicqQEkq2qKceSxnvBnggw&index=1&feature=plcp A silent comedy movie starri...
Edgar Melara's insight:

These comedy movies were made to really bring the people into theaters. The viewers would come to watch a great show full of laughter. This Charlie Chaplin film gained a lot of popularity because of its scenes of unfortunate events happening to the main character. 

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Gangster Films 1931: The Public Enemy

Gangster Films 1931: The Public Enemy | Classic Hollywood 1900's | Scoop.it
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When these movies first came, it was illegal to give the main character a happy ending if he was a criminal. The government didn't want people to think that a life of crime could be a good thing. That is why the main character dies in the end of the film The Public Enemy and says "I'm Not So Tough".

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Why Classic Hollywood Cinema started.

Why Classic Hollywood Cinema started. | Classic Hollywood 1900's | Scoop.it
Edgar Melara's insight:

Classic Hollywood started the "Genre". 

Genres are a type or category. By making genres, the producers could give the audiences somewhat of an expectation. 

If audiences desired a specific genre, more and more movies of that category were made. 

Studios also created genres to make the viewer desire a particular type of film. 

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42nd Street - Lloyd Bacon (1933)

Escena final de 42nd Street de Lloyd Bacon
Edgar Melara's insight:

On 42nd Street was a Lloyd Bacon film made in 1932. It was one of the first succesful musicals during the Classic Hollywood Cinema era. It was filmed in a large studio with a painted background. 

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Classic Hollywood

Classic Hollywood | Classic Hollywood 1900's | Scoop.it
Edgar Melara's insight:

Classic Hollywood Cinema really kept the audiences in the movie. The producers didn't want the viewers to realize they were watching a movie, but to pull them into the film. These films had deep focuses on narratives. They also used editing techniques such as "invisible cinema". They also used total unity in time, space, and causation. 

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Film Noir 1940: Stranger On The Third Floor

Film Noir 1940: Stranger On The Third Floor | Classic Hollywood 1900's | Scoop.it
Edgar Melara's insight:

Film Noir usually had a "Femme Fatale" which means a seductive woman who will bring disaster to a man who gets involved with her. These films also had a strong focus on narration. They also had contrast aesthetic which was a some disorriented background. The background shadows were made to somewhat confuse the viewer. 

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Horror Films 1931: Frankenstein

Horror Films 1931: Frankenstein | Classic Hollywood 1900's | Scoop.it
Edgar Melara's insight:

Back when Classic Hollywood Cinema first started, horror movies were frowned upon. No one wanted to watch a scary movie about a mad doctor who created a living being from parts of corpses. Eventually, people began to enjoy these kinds of films, and their popularity grew. They became one of the most popular genres in the Classic Hollywood Cinema era.

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Classic Films in Focus: FURY (1936)

Classic Films in Focus: FURY (1936) | Classic Hollywood 1900's | Scoop.it
Edgar Melara's insight:

Fury (1936) marks director Fritz Lang's debut as a Hollywood filmmaker, although by the time he arrived in the United States he had already made important films like Metropolis(1927), M (1931), and The Testament of Dr. Mabuse (1933). Despite its key position as a transitional work for the director, Fury is not as widely known today as some of Lang's other American pictures, the most popular being his 1953 noir classic, The Big Heat, but Fury is nonetheless an excellent film, filled with gripping performances and all of the director's favorite themes.

 

http://virtualvirago.blogspot.com/2013/02/classic-films-in-focus-fury-1936.html

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Classical Hollywood cinema - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Classical Hollywood cinema or the classical Hollywood narrative,[1] are terms used in film history which designate both a visual and sound style for making motion pictures and a mode of production used in the American film industry between 1927 and 1963. This period is often referred to as the "golden age of Hollywood." An identifiable cinematic form emerged during this period called classical Hollywood style.[2]

Classical style is fundamentally built on the principle of continuity editing or "invisible" style. That is, the camera and the sound recording should never call attention to themselves (as they might in films from earlier periods, other countries or in a modernist or postmodernist work).

During the golden age of Hollywood, which lasted from the end of the silent era in American cinema in the late 1920s to the early 1960s, films were prolifically issued by the Hollywood studios.[3] The start of the golden age was arguably when The Jazz Singer was released in 1927 and increased box-office profits for films as sound was introduced to feature films. Most Hollywood pictures adhered closely to a genre—Western, slapstick comedy, musical, animated cartoon, biopic (biographical picture)—and the same creative teams often worked on films made by the same studio.

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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Classical_Hollywood_cinema

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