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CJones: Population & Development
population: local, national or global scale, development, globalisation
Curated by Claire Jones
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The global debt clock

The global debt clock | CJones: Population & Development | Scoop.it
Authoritative weekly newspaper focusing on international politics and business news and opinion.

 

Tags: Economic, currency, visualization.


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Guillaume Decugis's comment, September 6, 2012 3:06 PM
Remember when we used to talk about the 3rd-world debt being a problem? (Back when the term 3rd world was actually not politically incorrect...) Well, this map clearly shows, debt is a 1st-world problem now...

Awesome map Seth! Thanks for sharing.
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“Don’t complain about things that you can’t change”

“Don’t complain about things that you can’t change” | CJones: Population & Development | Scoop.it
THE greatest wave of voluntary migration in human history transformed China’s cities, and the global economy, in a single generation.

 

After a generation of intense rural to urban migration in China, barriers to social mobility still remain intact. 


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Hua YAN's curator insight, February 6, 5:15 PM

阶层固化到了如此地步,和谐社会,从何谈起?!

Cam E's curator insight, April 8, 11:10 AM

China's system of classification in this article is what really struck out at me. People are classified as "Rural" or "Non-Rural" and it runs through the family line. So even if a child is born in a city to rural parents, he or she is counted as rural and therefore is treated a bit like a second class citizen.

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Global Closet Calculator

Global Closet Calculator | CJones: Population & Development | Scoop.it

The Global Closet Calculator aggregates the contents of your closet by origin to generate a map showing your unique global footprint, and puts you in charge of the global journey your stuff takes to get to you.

 

As I've worked now with the Rhode Island Geography Education Alliance, I've had the good fortune to interact with the folks at National Geographic.  They are preparing for Geography Awareness Week (Nov 11-17th) with the theme "Declare your Interdependence!"  This newly released interactive feature allows students of all ages to see the global interconnections in their lives.   By analyzing the items in our closets (or any of the items that we consume), we can easily see that  our own personal geographies create a web of global interconnectedness.

 

Tags: NationalGeographic, GeographyEducation, K12, consumption, globalization. 


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Mapping Population Density

Mapping Population Density | CJones: Population & Development | Scoop.it
I found these cartograms from an article in the Telegraph and was immediately impressed. The cartograms originated here and use data from the Global Rural-Urban Mapping Project as to create the int...

 

This series of cartograms shows some imbalanced populations (such as the pictured Australia) by highlighting countries that have established forward capitals.  Question to ponder: Do forward capitals change the demographic regions of a country significantly enough to justify moving the capital? 


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Joe Andrade's curator insight, August 5, 2013 10:21 PM

Interseting way to visualy map population density.

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 7:28 PM

It's a creative and vial way to map population density. 

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Population Growth & Tricky Ethics | Peak Oil News and Message ...

Population Growth & Tricky Ethics | Peak Oil News and Message ... | CJones: Population & Development | Scoop.it
A prevailing discourse in the Green movement centers on population growth. With more people we run into more and more problems including lack of resources like arable land and potable water. Climate change will only ...
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100 People: A World Portrait

100 People: A World Portrait | CJones: Population & Development | Scoop.it

This is the truly global project that asks the children of the world to introduce us to the people of the world.  We've seen videos and resources that ask the question, "if there were only 100 people in the world, what would it look like?"  This takes that idea of making demographic statistics more meaningful one step further by asking student in schools for around the world to nominate some "representative people" and share their stories.  The site houses videos, galleries from each continent and analyze themes that all societies must deal with.  This site that looks at the people and places on out planet to promote greater appreciation of cultural diversity and understanding is a great find. 

 

Tags: Worldwide, statistics, K12, education, comparison.


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Yagmur Pak's comment, April 21, 2013 6:42 AM
The 100 People Foundation is designed to sketch a portrayal of the world in terms of population and wealth distribution by representing the entire global neighborhood through stories and illustrations. This Foundation provides immense opportunities to help students acknowledge the global issues facing our planet and improve their abilities on examining statistics about the world population. As a pre-service teacher, I would use this website to engage my Stage 2 students in learning about the diversity around the world and raising their awareness about the issues that affect the planet we all share. Students can contribute to this world portrait by celebrating someone or something in their community (e.g. interviewing Indigenous people about the diversity within their community) through photography and writing about the specific information about their part of the world. Such an assignment has the prospective to commence a discussion of understanding of who we are and what position we occupy in the world. This HSIE assignment can also be linked to a Mathematics lesson in which students collect data from their local community in small groups where they have a look at the diversity of specific groups between communities. Teachers can provide students with a few variables in order to make the task challenging, but well supported. I believe, the 100 People Foundation is offering captivating and thought-provoking resources to expand children’s view of the world which may provide vast opportunities for students to “develop awareness of similarities and differences of beliefs and practices in various cultures, and learn to detect and avoid cultural stereotypes and prejudices” (Commonwealth of Australia, 2008, p.9).

Reference:
Commonwealth of Australia (2008). Global Perspectives: A framework for global education in Australian schools. Curriculum Corporation: Carlton South Vic.
ana boa-ventura's curator insight, June 28, 2013 2:31 AM

If you're looking at social media and diversity don't miss this site...In the last couple of years we've seen several sites / videos/ blogs rotating around the question 'if there were only 100 people in the world... ' In this case, children were asked to identify 'representative people' of that group of 100 and use visuals... many visuals.  And visuals of course bring up skin color, living conditions and much more. I don't want to be a spoiler though...Viist the site!

Canberra Girls Grammar GSSF's curator insight, September 1, 2013 10:43 PM

Year 7 Liveability Unit 2

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Younger Africa

Younger Africa | CJones: Population & Development | Scoop.it
Across Africa, a continent where the average age is about 19, protests have flared against leaders who may have outstayed their welcome.

 

This interactive mapping feature compares two distinct data sets in an attempt to show that the two are correlated on the continent of Africa.  The base layer of this thematic map is demographic, noting how much of the overall population in a given country is under the age of 16.  The interactive feature with point data describes the political unrest or instability in that particular country. 

 

Questions to ponder: Does the cartographer 'convince' you that Africa's having a very young (globally speaking) demographic cohort led towards greater political instability?  Are there other factors worth considering?  What does this map and it's embedded data tell us?    

 

Tags: Africa, political, conflict, unit 4 political, states, governance, population, demographics, unit 2 population. 


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Flexible Urban Planning

mixed used train-tracks/market place...

 

I've used similar videos in my classes and students are usually quite shocked to see how a city like Bangkok, Thailand operates.  I've used this as a 'hook' for lessons of population growth, urbanization, economic development, sustainability, megacities and city planning. 


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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, April 24, 2:38 PM

I found this video disturbing.  Maybe because we have train safety taught to us were they stress that you need to stay away from the tracks, here the people are sitting next to a train track and even have goods for sale that the train drives over.  I think it is interesting how they reclaim the space but the mom in me worries about kids getting run over by the train.

David Week's curator insight, August 12, 6:04 PM

I love this video. Never think that the "third world" is not more dynamic and innovative than the first!

Jeffrey Ing's curator insight, August 13, 5:12 AM

people are not giving up with inflated price of urban land. They adapt and live with it :)

 

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Australian Census Stats: The population capacity of Australia

How many people can Australia handle, based on food growing capacity?
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Population: a big problem but easy to solve - On Line Opinion - 13/8/2009

Population: a big problem but easy to solve - On Line Opinion - 13/8/2009 | CJones: Population & Development | Scoop.it
Australia's population growth should be considered an economic and environmental problem of huge proportions.
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