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Doctor Outlines West's Role in India's 'Brain Drain'

Fitzhugh Mullan, a professor of health policy and pediatrics at George Washington University, says the West undertrains doctors and nurses, creating a vacuum — "an irresistibly appealing vacuum to ambitious, well-trained people in the developing...

 

The best educated Indians are incredibly well-suited to migrate to other countries for better-paying jobs in other regions.  What are the interregional impacts of this process? 


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Stacey Jackson's curator insight, May 8, 2013 8:19 PM

This must be a challenging issue for India to address. More people from the country are being educated at top medical universities, but they are not returning to the country to live and work there. This affects India's ability to advance its economy but also the health of its citizens. In a way, it reminds me of Rhode Island, where many well-educated and talented young people leave for jobs in other states after going to college in Providence.

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UN High Commissioner for Refugees

UN High Commissioner for Refugees | CJones: Population & Development | Scoop.it
The key facts and figures about refugees, IDPs, asylum seekers and stateless people from UNHCR's annual Global Trends report.

 

Not all migation is voluntary.  Refugees and other non-voluntary migrants often are in their situation due to complex geographic factors beyond their control at the national scale. 

 

Tags: migration, population, development, conflict, statistics, war, unit 2 population.


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Mr Ortloff's curator insight, January 22, 2013 12:20 AM

Good source for stats on non-voluntary migrants.

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AIDS/HIV

AIDS/HIV | CJones: Population & Development | Scoop.it

AIDS is a global issue, but clearly this impacts Sub-Saharan Africa far more than any other region. 

 

Tags: Africa, medical, infographic, development.


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Refugees as a Part of World Migration Patterns

Refugees as a Part of World Migration Patterns | CJones: Population & Development | Scoop.it

A refugee is a person who has been pushed away from their homeland and seeks refuge in another place. The United Nations High Commissioner on Refugees (UNHCR) provides a more narrow definition of a refugee as someone who flees their home country due to a “well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion.”


As Neal Lineback notes in this Geography in the News post, not all refugees are covered by this definition.  Environmental refugees have been forced to leave their homes beause of soil degradation, deserticfication, flooding, drought, climate change and other environmental factors. 


Tags: environment, environment depend, migration, unit 2 population.


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Samantha Johns's curator insight, September 10, 9:35 AM

Refuges make up a big percent of the world's migration. Many people believe that you migrate because of choice, but that is not always true.  Many people (refuges) are forced from their home. This can  be due to a war or racial discrimination, along with many other things. Refuges will may travel to a neighboring state, country, or even continent to get away from persecution.

                                                                                                                       -SJ

jadaconner's curator insight, September 10, 9:47 AM

 Refugees are found in a large percent of Earth’s surface. Some people chose to migrate, while others are forced. Some leave their home in order to get away from their country, for example due to a war. Many flee to nearby countries and are afraid to return to their hometown because they are frightened of what might happen if they go back. Another reason many refugees leave their country is due to environmental problems and the people cannot afford to live in that country.

Elle Reagan's curator insight, October 17, 1:31 PM

I felt like this article was very relevant to our Unit 2, Population. We have talked about refugees and migration in a great deal and I thought this map was a good visual. I also liked the information it provided about what refugees really are and that they are really a part of the world migration pattern.

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Countries with the Most Migrants

Countries with the Most Migrants | CJones: Population & Development | Scoop.it

List of the countries with the most migrants in the world as measured by net migration rate.


Which countries have the most migrants per capita living there?  What spatial or development patterns do you see on this list?  


Tags: Migration, population, Immigration, statistics, worldwide, unit 2 population. 


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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 22, 12:04 PM

This is an interesting little chart because it reveals to us which countries have the highest percentage of migrants that make up their general population. Definitely suprised me to see Qatar as the number one on the list, I would have expected the US to be at the top, but it is not even in the top 10!

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 7:26 PM

This shows the net migration of immigrants. 

Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, September 30, 4:04 PM

Remember this is based on a % of the total population, and not total #. Which countries have the most migrants per capita living there?  What spatial or development patterns do you see on this list? 

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Russians are leaving the country in droves

Russians are leaving the country in droves | CJones: Population & Development | Scoop.it
Over a bottle of vodka and a traditional Russian salad of pickles, sausage and potatoes tossed in mayonnaise, a group of friends raised their glasses and wished Igor Irtenyev and his family a happy journey to Israel.

 

My regional class has been learning about Russia this week and when I first started teaching a few years ago, I would teach that Russia had a population of 145 million.  Today it is 141 million and part of that is due to migrants leaving a country that they see as lacking in economic opportunities and political freedoms (another part of the story is that birth rates plummeted after the collapse of the Soviet Union in what demographers have called the "Russian Cross").  In the last few years the population appears to have stabilized, but there are still many who do not see a vibrant future from themselves within Russia.  

 

Tags: Russia, migration, Demographics, immigration, unit 2 population.


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Meagan Harpin's curator insight, September 28, 2013 11:44 PM

In the last 10 years about 1.25 million russians have emigrated out of Russia, but the way they do it is interesting. When they leave they dont sell their houses, or aparments, or cars they simply lock their doors and quietly slip away to the airports at night. The reasons for leaving are different thought, some are leaving because the prime minister is expected to return while some are leaving because of the awful econonmy. Either way the massive amounts of emigration is leading to a higher death rate then birth rate overall. 

Nathan Chasse's curator insight, March 1, 1:23 AM

This article from a couple years ago is about Russian emigration. A large number of Russians were leaving the country for better economic opportunity. Some cite the overbearing rule of Putin, but the pay in other countries is just better than what Russia can offer. This was particularly the case for the more educated, another instance of "brain drain" hurting a nation which is already in trouble.

Jess Deady's curator insight, May 1, 12:00 PM

Migration occurs for many reasons. People move from country to country every day. Leaving Russia was this families choice and moving to Israel can have an impact on them greater than if they were to stay in Russia.

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Thomas Malthus and Population Growth

Learn more: http://www.khanacademy.org/video?v=r1ywppAJ1xs Thomas Malthus's views on population. Malthusian limits.

 

This is a succinct (but not perfect) summary of Malthusian ideas on population.  What do you think of his ideas?  Any specific parts of his theory that you agree with?  Do you disagree with some of his ideas?  What did history have to say about it?  

 

Tags: Demographics, population, models, APHG,  unit 2 population. 


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Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 7:12 PM

This video very well explains the malthusian theory and how it is associated with population

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 7:56 PM

Unit 2

Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 21, 11:27 PM

 

unit 2

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The Economic and Political Impact of Immigrants, Latinos and Asians State by State

The Economic and Political Impact of Immigrants, Latinos and Asians State by State | CJones: Population & Development | Scoop.it

Not every state is equally impacted by migration, and the demographic profile of migrants is different for every state. This is an online mapping tool to search a large database that can give the user state specific information about the impact of economics and politics based on migration from Latin America and Asia on any given state.

 

Tags: Immigration, unit 2 population, migration, economic, statistics, mapping, political.


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The State of Women in the World

The State of Women in the World | CJones: Population & Development | Scoop.it

Tags: gender, development, worldwide, poverty.


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Lauren Jacquez's curator insight, February 12, 2013 1:39 PM

Gender Development index - CHapter 9 materials

Amy Marques's curator insight, July 2, 2013 11:09 AM

This is a great represenaton for showing the unfortunate truth of the state women in the world today.

Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 11:15 AM

Why are women so unequal to men? Why are women in the Middle East seeing such bad treatment and unequality? How can we fix these problems?

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What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans?

What Would Happen If The Entire World Lived Like Americans? | CJones: Population & Development | Scoop.it

After making an infographic depicting how much space would be needed to house the entire world’s population based on the densities of various global cities, Tim De Chant of Per Square Mile got to thinking about the land resources it takes to support those same cities.


Tags: consumption, development, resources, energy, density, sustainability.


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Michelle Carvajal's comment, September 18, 2012 6:23 PM
Its very interesting that the United Arab Emirates would need more land mass than lets say China and the US. I guess what I'm trying to say is that the common misconception of people is that China has the greatest population. I definetely will rescoop this because people could actually see how hard it must be to house people who in essence would need all this land mass to live comfortably.
Thomas D's comment, April 22, 2013 4:13 PM
I thought that this was a very interesting graph and article to read. It shows that if the rest of the world lived like us Americans we would need four times the world’s surface, which is pretty substantial to think about. Although the United Arab Emirates is the leading this graph it’s hard to believe that America is in second. This goes to show that our way of living is out of hand, that the only reason we haven’t consumed everything is because the rest of the world is living of more reasonable amounts of resources or no resources at all. That we need to be as a country more conservative of our resources before we have to rely even more heavily than we already do on other countries. I was surprised to see that India has such a small percentage of resource consummation considering it is such a highly populated country.
Brianna Simao's comment, April 30, 2013 10:23 PM
Countries with a more advanced and urbanized way of life clearly would need more space to survive but if everyone lived like these more developed countries then natural selection dies and survival of the fittest takes over. Eventually all the natural resources would be used up. If they all continued to use the same amount and reproduce then the fertility rate would rapidly increase making the area overpopulated and the quality of life decreased. It is a good thing the entire world lives differently and has a diverse ecological footprint because it creates a balance in the world. As one country’s consumption is out of control another is holding down the fort because they lice more reasonably. It is interesting to see that even though China and India have the largest populations they don’t consume as many resources as the United States and the United Arab Emirates.
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How future urban sprawl maps out

How future urban sprawl maps out | CJones: Population & Development | Scoop.it
Projections of urban growth indicate areas where biodiversity is at high risk.

 

The AAG Smart Brief is a fantastic source of geographic news.  This is what they said about this article:  "Areas such as tropical Africa and eastern China are expected to be hot spots of urbanization during the next several years, according to researchers, who used satellite imagery and other data to project future urban expansion through 2030. 'We're not forecasting population, we're forecasting the expansion of urban space,' said Yale University geographer Karen Seto. Their efforts could be used to assist conservation initiatives, Seto noted."

 

Tags: AAG, urban, sprawl, land use, urban ecology, biogeography, unit 7 cities, environment.


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Lauren Fiedler's comment, July 24, 2013 7:56 AM
This article is about urban growth and decline, Africa and Asia are predicted to be hot spots of urban growth in the next few years. Geographer Karen Seto of Yale University in New Haven has creted a graph that finally accounts for variations in how individual cities occupy their land and the impact they have on local ecosystems.
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7 Billion and Counting

7 Billion and Counting | CJones: Population & Development | Scoop.it

DE: Interesting to think how many people the world could really handle. Amazingly, all 7 billion could fit in LA if they were shoulder to shoulder. Yet the high birth rates and low death rates raise dire consequences. In my opinion, I think further efforts need to be made to curb population growth or bigger problems may arise.

 

Tags: population, Demographics. 


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India is Joining the Worldwide Race to Urbanize « A Smarter Planet Blog

India is Joining the Worldwide Race to Urbanize « A Smarter Planet Blog | CJones: Population & Development | Scoop.it
India is experiencing unprecedented growth. In the next 20 years, 30 Indians will move every minute from rural India to the cities.
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Globalization

The world is becoming more and more interconnected. Globalization changes how people consume, work and live almost everywhere on the world. Today, many economic, political, cultural or ecological relationships are not explainable from a national perspective. At the same time, a controversial debate about the consequences of globalization has begun.

 

Questions to ponder: What are the driving forces behind globalization? What areas are most impacted by globalization?  How does globalization benefit some, and adversely impact others? Why?

 

Tags: Globalization, economic, industry, NGOs, political, scale, unit 6 industry.


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Kyle Toner's comment, September 10, 2012 12:31 PM
Globalization is an overall positive drive. In time globalization needs to mold developing countries who are in need of a better political and economical system
Sheyna Vargas's comment, September 10, 2012 1:16 PM
After watching this video, it is becoming clear that Globalization isn't just one-sided. While making it easier to connect with people all around the world and lowering costs for businesses, it is also causing harm to less developed countries. The question that pops into my head is, "Does the ends justify the means?" One could argue either point.
First, Globalization has made the world a "smaller" place. Not only is it easier to communicate with one another on different sides of the world but it’s also easier and cheaper to transport goods across nations and bodies of water. These are obviously benefits to both the developed countries and lesser developed countries in getting goods in timely fashions and producing jobs in both areas. Globalization also creates competition amongst developing nations to learn or advance in new skills to bring and/or keep jobs in their country/area.
On the other hand, Globalization is also wreaking havoc on cultural diversity around the global with Western music, food, and products becoming more available. Western culture is basically looked upon as the “money making” culture. Globalization, by creating competition is also harming local business in newly developing countries. This drives the prices down for the local businesses and makes them work for less.
Maricarmen Husson's curator insight, May 3, 2013 11:39 AM

Globalización Globalization

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Interactive World Statistics

Interactive World Statistics | CJones: Population & Development | Scoop.it

The Brazilian government's geographic department (Instituto Brasileiro de Geografia e Estatística-roughly equivalent to the U.S. Census Bureau) has compiled an fantastic interactive world factbook (available in English and Spanish as well as Portuguese).  The ease of navigation allows the user to conduct a specific search of simply explore demographic, economic, environmental and development data on any country in the world.    

 

Tags: population, worldwide, statistics, mapping, zbestofzbest.


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Leonardo Martins's comment, October 20, 2012 11:08 AM
So cool…thank you very much!
Jesse Gauthier's comment, October 24, 2012 10:23 AM
The world, here, is literally at your fingertips. It is a simple way for anyone to locate a multitude of data about any given place around the world. It is another way that brings the whole world that much closer in this technological era.
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Countries with the Most Migrants

Countries with the Most Migrants | CJones: Population & Development | Scoop.it

List of the countries with the most migrants in the world as measured by net migration rate.


Which countries have the most migrants per capita living there?  What spatial or development patterns do you see on this list?  


Tags: Migration, population, Immigration, statistics, worldwide, unit 2 population. 


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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 22, 12:04 PM

This is an interesting little chart because it reveals to us which countries have the highest percentage of migrants that make up their general population. Definitely suprised me to see Qatar as the number one on the list, I would have expected the US to be at the top, but it is not even in the top 10!

Lona Pradeep Parad's curator insight, May 28, 7:26 PM

This shows the net migration of immigrants. 

Adrian Bahan (MNPS)'s curator insight, September 30, 4:04 PM

Remember this is based on a % of the total population, and not total #. Which countries have the most migrants per capita living there?  What spatial or development patterns do you see on this list? 

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Tunneling through Andes to speed global trade

Tunneling through Andes to speed global trade | CJones: Population & Development | Scoop.it
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP) — South American engineers are trying to tackle one of the continent's greatest natural challenges: the towering Andes mountain chain that creates a costly physical barrier for...

 

At the NCGE conference, noted author Harm De Blij mentioned a daring project that would link Eastern South America with the Pacific as engineers were planning to tunnel under the Andes mountains.  Here is a link to an article on this intermodal transportation project that would lower the shipping costs from East Asia to the Southern Atlantic.  Government officials in both Argentina and Brazil have described the  project as a matter of "national interest."  

 

Tags: transportation, LatinAmerica, globalization, industry, economic, development, unit 6 industry.


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Jess Deady's curator insight, April 28, 2:14 PM

The Andes mountains are causing serious issues for Argentina. Obviously these mountains didn't grow over night but they have been more of a problem in recent years that in past years. Shipping costs are sky rocketing and in order for this South American country to keep a hold on its finances, they need to figure out a solution for transportation. A tunnel under the Andes mountains might just be the solution to this problem.

James Hobson's curator insight, September 29, 9:49 PM

(South America topic 1)

I can't help but relate Argentina's proposed railway to America's venture to build the first transcontinental railroad in the 1800s. If completed, this railroad would be a virtually invaluable resource for Argentina and world trade alike. Just like the Panama Canal, this railroad would be a time-saving and asset-saving passage which companies would willingly pay high premiums to use.

Although the article doesn't mention it specifically, I believe such a transportation achievement would also be a tourism attraction in and of itself. I can picture ads promoting scenic views of the Andes as seen from passenger cars. This concept is already a big hit in Newport, RI , North Conway, NH , and Grand Canyon, AZ , and British Columbia to name a few, and Argentina may find itself with the benefit of two expanding industries based on the same infrastructure.

Shanelle Zaino's curator insight, October 15, 9:55 PM

This is an immense undertaking ,billions of dollars and 10

years of construction. This seems to be a great plan to cut costs of shipping as well as eliminating time. I believe that as long as the environmental component is considered and protected this could be great for the Argentinian people.

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The Burgess and Hoyt Models

The Burgess and Hoyt Models | CJones: Population & Development | Scoop.it

It is possible in many cities to identify zones with a particular type of land use - eg a residential zone. Often these zones have developed due to a combination of economic and social factors. In some cases planners may have tried to separate out some land uses, eg an airport is separated from a large housing estate.

 

The concentric and sector models in one news article?  The BBC is showing once again the possibilities available if only the United States taught more geography in the schools. 

 

Tags: urban, models, unit 7 cities, APHG.


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Sally Egan's curator insight, June 25, 2013 7:50 PM

Useful to develop understanding of the models of urban landuse zones within cities.

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Documentary: Last Train Home

Documentary: Last Train Home | CJones: Population & Development | Scoop.it

Every spring, China's cities are plunged into chaos as 130 million migrant workers journey to their home villages for the New Year in the world's largest human migration.

 

I've posted in the past about this documentary which portrays the The cultural importance of New Year's in China and the massive corresponding migratory shifts that take place.  What is new is that the 85 minute documentary is now available online.  "Last Train Home takes viewers on a heart-stopping journey with the Zhangs, a couple who left infant children behind for factory jobs 16 years ago, hoping their wages would lift their children to a better life. They return to a family growing distant and a daughter longing to leave school for unskilled work. As the Zhangs navigate their new world, Last Train Home paints a rich, human portrait of China's rush to economic development."

 

Tags: China, EastAsia, migration, development, labor, development, transportation, unit 2 population.


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Betty Denise's comment, October 10, 2012 1:29 PM
The request video is not available ...
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Visualizing Regional Population Statistics

It was just over two centuries ago that the global population was 1 billion — in 1804. But better medicine and improved agriculture resulted in higher life expectancy for children, dramatically increasing the world population, especially in the West.

 

This is an excellent video for population and demographic units, but also for showing regional and spatial patterns within the global dataset (since terms like 'overpopulation' and 'carrying capacity' inherently have different meanings in distinct places and when analyzed at various scales). It is also a fantastic way to visualize population data and explain the ideas that are foundational for the Demographic Transition Model.

 

Tags: population, scale, visualization, Demographics, models, unit 2 population, sustainability, regions, spatial.


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Sarah Ann Glesenkamp's curator insight, September 17, 7:55 PM

Unit 2

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 4:03 PM

This video describes and explains how we got to a population of 7 billion people so fast

Mohamed Mohamed's curator insight, October 13, 4:04 PM

It also uses water to demonstrate it.

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In Venezuela Housing Crisis, Squatters Find 45-Story Walkup

In Venezuela Housing Crisis, Squatters Find 45-Story Walkup | CJones: Population & Development | Scoop.it
An unfinished skyscraper occupied by squatters is a symbol of Venezuela’s financial crisis in the 1990s, state control of the economy and a housing shortage.
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Earth from Above

Earth from Above | CJones: Population & Development | Scoop.it

I'm a huge fan of Yann Arthus-Bertrand's artistic aerial photography.  This image of Rio de Janeiro and the favela is a striking one. I am also posting this to show the how easy the website justpaste.it is to use.  Students with no website creation training can produce sharable materials online.  Now this isn't the most professional outlet, but I envision some middle school or high school students producing a class project that can be transformed into something that reaches a bigger audience as it is shared with a broader community. 

 

Tags: remote sensing, images, art, worldwide, K12, edtech.


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Matt Mallinson's comment, September 26, 2012 10:16 AM
This is a striking image. So much poverty purposely hidden behind the mountain, away from the tourists of Rio de Janeiro. It's a shame they have to live the way they do, there is no help from them from their country.
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"Million" Cities

"Million" Cities | CJones: Population & Development | Scoop.it

From TD-architects Theo Deutinger Rotterdam.

 

Rome was the first city with one million residents, with that occuring in 5 BC.  Over a thousand years later, London and Beijing joined that group as industrialization became the impetus for wide-scale urbanization.  Today we are seeing an explosion of "million cities" throughout the world. 


Tags: urban, megacities, unit 7 cities.


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Seth Dixon's comment, September 21, 2012 1:51 PM
The data is from 2006, so it's a little dated, but still useful.
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Full Extent of Africa’s Groundwater Resources Visualized for the First Time | New Security Beat

Full Extent of Africa’s Groundwater Resources Visualized for the First Time | New Security Beat | CJones: Population & Development | Scoop.it
the Blog of the Environmental Change and Security Program...
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India Leads World in Deaths of Children Under Five

India Leads World in Deaths of Children Under Five | CJones: Population & Development | Scoop.it
Child health improving slower in India than the rest of the world, United Nations study shows.
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Doctor Outlines West's Role in India's 'Brain Drain'

Fitzhugh Mullan, a professor of health policy and pediatrics at George Washington University, says the West undertrains doctors and nurses, creating a vacuum — "an irresistibly appealing vacuum to ambitious, well-trained people in the developing...

 

The best educated Indians are incredibly well-suited to migrate to other countries for better-paying jobs in other regions.  What are the interregional impacts of this process? 


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Stacey Jackson's curator insight, May 8, 2013 8:19 PM

This must be a challenging issue for India to address. More people from the country are being educated at top medical universities, but they are not returning to the country to live and work there. This affects India's ability to advance its economy but also the health of its citizens. In a way, it reminds me of Rhode Island, where many well-educated and talented young people leave for jobs in other states after going to college in Providence.