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CJones: Disasters & Climate Change
natural disasters, climate change
Curated by Claire Jones
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Viewing the ash plume from the Shiveluch Volcano | Google Earth Blog

Viewing the ash plume from the Shiveluch Volcano | Google Earth Blog | CJones: Disasters & Climate Change | Scoop.it
Amazing things about Google Earth - news, features, tips, technology, and applications...
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BBC Two - How Earth Made Us, Deep Earth

BBC Two - How Earth Made Us, Deep Earth | CJones: Disasters & Climate Change | Scoop.it
How the forces of the deep Earth played a role in the development of human civilisation.
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Climate Change Music Video

A musical video that serves as investigation into the causes and effects of global climate change and our opportunities to use science to offset it. Featuring Bill Nye, David Attenborough, Richard Alley and Isaac Asimov. "Our Biggest Challenge" is the 16th episode of the Symphony of Science series.  Visit http://symphonyofscience.com for more science remixes!

 

Tags: climatechange, environment, K12.


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Victoria Morgia Jamolod-Umbo's comment, September 27, 2012 9:11 AM
I am from the Philippines, and the effect of global warming in our country is really sad. Flash floods, earthquakes, heavy rains.... wasted lives. I wish there could be a true solution to this problem.
Wanda Faye Bryant's curator insight, January 7, 2014 4:51 PM

An interesting way to present the problem and solutions of rapid climate change to students.

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Bangladesh: Facing the Challenge

Global warming does not impact all areas equally, and in the future the less environmentally resilient countries will be at increasingly at risk.  Bangladesh, as a flat area prone to flooding, is especially vulnerable to anthropogenic climate change.  However, Bangladesh has implemented many changes in the cultural ecology to make sure that they are using the land differently to strengthen their environmental resilience.     


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Crissy Borton's curator insight, December 11, 2012 10:08 PM

When I think of innovation Bangladesh is not a place I think of. Yet they are coming up with innovative ways to deal with the global climate change. It is sad they are so effected by something they did not cause. 

Stacey Jackson's curator insight, May 8, 2013 8:29 PM

It was inspiring to see people in Bangladesh use ingenuity to adapt to climate change. Considering the nation's vulnerability to the effect of climate change, the introduction of solar panels, rain water harvesting and other techniques is essential. Maybe if other countries had the same sense of urgency, we would be making greater progress in terms of reversing climate change.

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The North Pole is on thin ice

The North Pole is on thin ice | CJones: Disasters & Climate Change | Scoop.it
While the world’s political leaders have left the negotiating table again without an agreement to reduce greenhouse gases, the Arctic has greater problems than ever – 75 percent of the sea ice has disappeared.

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megan b clement's curator insight, September 10, 2013 12:38 PM

"The North Pole ice thinning, another over looked issue, has risen to the surface. Over the past 100 years 50-75% of the sea ice has disappeared. Old ice, which is formed over several years, has been replaced with new ice. New ice come and goes through the year it was formed. Travel has been accelerated in the North Pole due to thinner ice. It makes you think about if these circumstances worsen where will it leave the marine life or animals who inhabit this region. What will be the result in the years to come if we continue to over look this issue?"

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Scientists call for research on climate link to geological hazards ...

Scientists call for research on climate link to geological hazards ... | CJones: Disasters & Climate Change | Scoop.it
Scientists call for research on climate link to geological hazards | Environment | guardian.co.uk. Scientists call for research on climate link to geological hazards Experts say suggestions that climate change could trigger more ...
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The Geography of Underwater Homes

The Geography of Underwater Homes | CJones: Disasters & Climate Change | Scoop.it
New data from Zillow shows fewer homeowners underwater, but the pattern varies widely by geography.

 

The Sunbelt (especially California and Florida) have the highest percentage of homeowners that are 'underwater' and owe more than the home is worth.  Also hit hard are declining metro areas area of the rust belt. 

Question to ponder: Why would these places be hit the hardest?  


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Google Earth A to Z: Volcanoes | Google Earth Blog

Google Earth A to Z: Volcanoes | Google Earth Blog | CJones: Disasters & Climate Change | Scoop.it
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Iceland's Volcanic Rivers

Iceland's Volcanic Rivers | CJones: Disasters & Climate Change | Scoop.it
Time and time again, we're reminded of nature's beauty. It's hard to believe, but these photos of real landscapes, not abstract paintings.

 

Andre Ermolaev, through his photography has captured the beauty of Iceland's geomorphology.  Being on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge, Iceland has abundant volcanic ash which adds rich color to the fluvial systems.  

 

Tags: geomorphology, physical, Europe, fluvial, water, landforms, images.


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Cam E's curator insight, February 27, 2014 11:20 AM

Iceland is one of my favorite countries, and the place I most want to visit and would most likely move to if I had to leave the United States. The landscape is insanely beautiful and the population is extremely small, something I enjoy as I dislike cities and a high population density. Even the capital of Iceland looks akin to a relatively average fishing town in the Northern US or Canada, and the entire country has less people in it than any given state in the US.

Wilmine Merlain's curator insight, December 18, 2014 2:57 PM

Nature has an incredible way at depicting and displaying its true beauty to the rest of the world. These images captured by photographer Andre Ermolaev looks like something that would be captured at a museum opening displaying some remarkable pieces of abstract work. Though this may not be the case, it gives you the desire to want to travel and experience this for yourself.

Kendra King's curator insight, January 22, 7:14 PM

My pretty pintrest picture

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33,000 flee volcano in Guatemala

33,000 flee volcano in Guatemala | CJones: Disasters & Climate Change | Scoop.it

DE: Despite some respiratory and eye issues, it seems from this article that no one was harmed in the eruptions. To me, this is very surprising. When I read the headline that 33,000 were evactuated due to a volcanic eruption in Guatemala, I figured there would be large death tolls. Instead, the evactuation crews managed the process very well and helped 17 villages flee the mighty act of nature. 


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Cam E's curator insight, February 4, 2014 12:23 PM

It's not very often that everyone gets away scot-free from erupting volcanoes, and it's good to hear that it went well. The destructive power of those things are some of the most immense in nature. I myself climbed Mt. Etna back in 2012 and the ash from an eruption in 2005 was knee-deep in some places.

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Wrong Climate for Damming Rivers

The "Wrong Climate for Damming Rivers," with Right Livelihood Award Winner Nnimmo Bassey, explores the impacts of climate change and hydropower on the world'...

 

This video is related to our topic as it shows how something like a dam, which one might think is a positive agent for change can have massive a negative impact upon the people in surrounding areas and the environment in general. Something such evaporation in the pooled water reducing available drinking water is something which is easy to misunderstand, but is a real threat in areas which have drinking water issues, such as Sub-Saharan Africa.. The damming of rivers also deprives down stream areas of the water they rely upon. This video is a good introduction to these kinds of ideas, and many others.


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The end of nature?

The end of nature? | CJones: Disasters & Climate Change | Scoop.it
It isn’t the first time I’ve been to Usinsk in the very north of Russia, so I shouldn’t be surprised — but once again, I’m shocked.

 

An interesting look at some environmental issues in the far north of Russia (and when Russians think that it's far north, it's REALLY far north).


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Denise Pacheco's curator insight, September 24, 2013 11:13 AM

It's horrifying to see such a large space go to such waste thanks to toxic oil spills. Business / people have no respect for nature. This space could have been used to build homes, start a new business , or even for agricultural purpose. The government should step in and clean this up because this land can help boost their economy as well if they put it to good use. It's mind over matter! They need to get to work on this ASAP!

Cam E's curator insight, February 18, 2014 11:35 AM

I never thought of the impact of on-land oil spills, usually it's only something I'd think occurred in the oceans, but I understand now that oil spreading throughout the soil and forests can have an effect just as disastrous.

James Hobson's curator insight, October 20, 2014 9:42 PM

(Russia topic 5 [independent topic 1])

Russia's blind eye to environmental regulation hasn't stopped at Lake Baikal. Sadly the Siberian landscape is being destroyed at an unimaginable scale by careless oil operations. Companies well known even here in the U.S. like Lukoil and Shell are running operations that aren't just harming the environment... they're eradicating it. Even disregarding all of the political tensions, it is shameful to note how one's morality, one's instinct's, one's sense of heart, one's common sense haven't kicked in by now. It's one thing for a nation to exploit itself, but when universal things (such as the environment) which are inarguably are ruined, there lies an even more severe sense of immorality and beyond-monetary "debt" owed to the rest of the world.

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The hunger wars in our future: Heat, drought, rising food costs, and global unrest

The hunger wars in our future: Heat, drought, rising food costs, and global unrest | CJones: Disasters & Climate Change | Scoop.it
The physical effects of climate change will prove catastrophic. But the social effects -- food riots, state collapse, mass migrations, and conflicts of every sort -- could prove even more disruptiv...

 

This is an inflammatory article from an environmental organization that is speculative in nature (in other words, take it with a grain of salt).  Yet, this type of thinking about the future and thought exercises is worthy of our investigation.  What do you foresee in the future given the current conditions? 


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Man-Made Cities and Natural Disasters

Man-Made Cities and Natural Disasters | CJones: Disasters & Climate Change | Scoop.it
Patrick assesses the future of world order, state sovereignty, and multilateral cooperation.

 

The 21st century is the dawn of a new era in human history: more people on Earth live in cities than in the countryside.  The impacts of this new basic fact are far-reaching.  One of those is that cities that are in particular environments are more prone to certain natural disasters and will be increasingly vulnerable as their populations increase (especially megacities in the developing world).


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