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The True Size Of Africa

The True Size Of Africa | CJones: GIS - GoogleEarth - Cartography | Scoop.it

This is another old classic image that I might have shared earlier but it merits repeating. As Salvatore Natoli (a leader in geography education) once said, "In our society we unconsciously equate size with importance and even power." This is one reason why many people have underestimated the true size of Africa relative to places that they view as more important or more powerful.


Tags: mapping, Africa, perspective, images. 


Via Seth Dixon
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Afrikasources's curator insight, January 15, 2014 10:10 AM

Just a reminder

Edelin Espino's curator insight, December 5, 2014 11:01 AM

It is incredible big, but unfortunately most of the north area is cover by the big Sahara and most of the are is typically unfertilized. 

Jason Schneider's curator insight, March 9, 4:29 PM

As we can see, there's a little overlapping here and some empty spots but it's pretty accurate. The United States and China are in the top 5 largest countries of the world list and they still fit in the 2nd largest continent of the world, Africa. I'd like to see the size comparison between Africa and Russia. I did some research on that and it turns out that Russia is a little over half the size of Africa, maybe the size of the combination of the United States and China.

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Stratocam: Google Earth Imagery

Stratocam: Google Earth Imagery | CJones: GIS - GoogleEarth - Cartography | Scoop.it

Much like sites that you can rate items up or down, you can rate the best aerial photography via Google Earth screen shots. There are some beautiful images and places to be discovered through this site. The physical and human landscapes are both intermingled in this fantastic collection of images…be careful, it can be amazingly addictive.   One this blog post I've added 13 of my favorite cultural and physical landscapes on to http://www.stratocam.com 


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Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 2, 2012 12:56 PM
These satellite images are truly spectacular! They are beautiful and, yes, addicting to look at! I found it interesting that the images of manmade cities/landscapes had similar design and curvature to the images of Mother Nature's oceans and forestry.
Don Brown Jr's comment, September 3, 2012 10:51 PM
Visually on a ground level it is hard to conceptualize the significance of the surrounding landscape. How people alter our surroundings can reveal a lot about the history and culture of a particular society. Although the architecture at Vlagtwedde in the Netherlands is quite stunning from an aerial view, this fortress was designed to repel invaders and control the area. Even if you don’t know much about this country’s history, this image reveals that it was most likely not a peaceful place in the 16th and 17th century.
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Image Analysis

Image Analysis | CJones: GIS - GoogleEarth - Cartography | Scoop.it
One of a number of large wildfires that have affected northern California in 2012, the Chips fire burned more than 75,000 acres by the time firefighters had contained it.

 

2012 is going to go down in United States history as the year with the most acres burned in a single year (statistics only go back to 1960).  The two featured images were taken earlier this month to display a Northern California wildfire; both with the same spatial resolution and acquired for the same instrument (Advanced Land Imager on EO-1 satellite), yet they are quite distinct.  One shows an aerial photograph, displaying exactly what standard visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum (showing us what our eyes would normally see).  The other image displays a false color (near infrared) image. 

 

Questions to ponder: what advantages does each image have for analyzing the fire damage?  Drawbacks?  How does the data from both images work together to create a more complete picture of the situation?     

 

Tags: remote sensing, images, environment, land use, disasters, biogeography. 


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Lisa Fonseca's comment, September 17, 2012 10:22 AM
The first image displays a better visual of exactly where the fire damaged the land, the second image doesn't provide a clear visual to someone, the land effected is foggy. If I was going to visit this specific area in Northern California I would much rather use the first aerial image.
Jesse Gauthier's comment, September 17, 2012 10:31 AM
The first image gives a good spatial shot of where the exact hot spots are located that cannot be seen by the naked eye. The second photo will give you a spatial view of what you can actually see. Both are needed to put out the hot spot because they each will provide two different solutions to stop the burning acres.
Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 25, 2013 8:33 AM

2012 is going to go down in United States history as the year with the most acres burned in a single year (statistics only go back to 1960).  The two featured images were taken earlier this month to display a Northern California wildfire; both with the same spatial resolution and acquired for the same instrument (Advanced Land Imager on EO-1 satellite), yet they are quite distinct.  One shows an aerial photograph, displaying exactly what standard visible portion of the electromagnetic spectrum (showing us what our eyes would normally see).  The other image displays a false color (near infrared) image. 


Questions to ponder: what advantages does each image have for analyzing the fire damage?  Drawbacks?  How does the data from both images work together to create a more complete picture of the situation?     


Tags: remote sensing, images, environment, land use, disasters, biogeography.