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Rescooped by J Rock Lancaster from Black History Online
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A dream unrealized for African-Americans in Chicago

A dream unrealized for African-Americans in Chicago | Civil Rights Movement | Scoop.it
When Martin Luther King Jr. gave his "I Have a Dream" speech in 1963, most blacks here were living in poor, segregated neighborhoods. They still are.

Via Black History Online
J Rock Lancaster's insight:

I can agree with the author in a lot points he wrote down, however he does have to understand that it is a different time and different economy so I wouldn't just point fingers, we should be trying to find solutions. Yes his facts and statistics does seem to be right, but it's not everyone's fault who's living in poverty, and ghettos, and who doesn't have job.  Now there is someone to blame, but we just can't keep blaming America for what they use to do to us or what's going on now we need solutions and results. I hate when people continue to make excuses some people who are unemployed and live in poverty it is their fault for it, but we need to help and not blame everything on "America" or "the white man" I hate when black people say things like that it's ignorance, and excuses.

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8 Resources for Teaching the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington - PBS NewsHour Extra | PBS

8 Resources for Teaching the 50th Anniversary of the March on Washington - PBS NewsHour Extra | PBS | Civil Rights Movement | Scoop.it
August 28, 2013 marks the 50th anniversary of the March on Washington and Martin Luther King’s famed “I Have a Dream” speech.
J Rock Lancaster's insight:

I believe this is a very convenient article and teaching, and should be taught daily all over the country to our kids. It educates about what it was like back in the day, and I believe it'll take a better understanding to kids of what black really had to go through. It'll enhance not only the mind about the history, but give kids the idea to not take educate and freedom for granted period. To many kids walk around and take education and life for granted and we as a guide need to enhance their mind with how reality use to. Instilling this knowledge in kids will make some want more out of life, and it'll be able to allow them to teach their children's children about the struggle of blacks for freedom.

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Martin Luther King - I Have A Dream Speech - August 28, 1963

I Have a Dream Speech Martin Luther King's Address at March on Washington August 28, 1963. Washington, D.C. When we let freedom ring, when we let it ring fro...

Via Velvet Martin
J Rock Lancaster's insight:

While listening to Martin Luther King's "I Have A Dream" Speech I found it to be  very inspirational, forth coming, and powerful towards his audience and me. He spoke of having a dream regardless of the hardships and struggles endured, he still had a vision of seeing our nation come together as one, not just Negroes, but everyone. He stressed the importance that unless we could come together in brotherhood and sisterhood, unless America was to become a great nation his dream would have to become true. He also explained how him and his people wouldn't settle being content or rest with the harsh treatment from those who participated or believed in the injustices, until justice was to emerged.  King also spoke about his people not satisfying their thirst for freedom by "drinking from the cup of bitterness and hatred" by conducting the struggle with dignity and discipline, which also supports his overall dream, he didn't contradict himself. He also talked about because of the misdoings of some whites not to stereotype all whites. Dr. King brought up all the issues the black community was going through, and he had faith that it would someday change. He was determined in his speech and I could feel his energy and determination as he spoke every word, it felt as if I was there. I could also feel the power in his voice that he was willing to put anything on the line for his dream to come true. His speech was full of ethos, logos, and pathos, and it went past persuasion it was a speech of hope and encouragement to his people that change was going to come no matter what sacrifice, or hardship it was going to take.

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Honouring the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" - THE CANADIAN

Honouring the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" - THE CANADIAN | Civil Rights Movement | Scoop.it
His Holiness the Dalai Lama speaks from his residence in Dharamsala, India, about his hope and dream in honor of the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King Jr.'s "I Have a Dream" speech

Via John Malloy
J Rock Lancaster's insight:

I think that John Lewis is a good man and also a man of integrity and dream as of Dr. King. I believe he wants to just see process and change, and that he's right about America still having hurt. We're not all the way to that country we could be, things still need to be fixed and changed. I also agree with him saying President Barack Obama being elected as the first black president being a down play on Martin Luther King's dream, because that's not what Dr. King was talking about in his dream. He wasn't just talking about blacks having more power, he was talking about rights, freedom, and justice. Yes I do believe Barack Obama being in office is nice, but it's not the fulfillment or even close to the fulfillment of King's dream. I did find myself not like Clinton's comparison of Lincoln and King to be a bit offensive. Lincoln's motives were to preserve the union so he could keep himself in office, those are the only reason why he gave those speeches, he wasn't giving his life for the union. I think Clinton and others put Lincoln on a pedal stool too much. King on the other hand gave his life for the people, his country, he wasn't looking forward to becoming president or anything of that nature. He knew he was risking his life making the speeches he made. So Clinton saying "In the shadow of Lincolns statute" is crazy.

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The Godly Hope of MLK’s Dream Deserves a Humble Response

The Godly Hope of MLK’s Dream Deserves a Humble Response | Civil Rights Movement | Scoop.it
*The words of Dr. Martin Luther King’s “I Have A Dream” speech at the Lincoln Memorial in August 1963, infused hope and inspiration to the mixed m

Via Skip Boykin
J Rock Lancaster's insight:

I must agree with Larry Buford there is discrimination, prejudice, and injustice still going on around our country. Yes I do believe that we have come a long way as a country, but their is still much improvement. I believe that we as a people must respond to his dream and that his dream is developing into a reality. I believe that those who continue to hate and be prejudice are killers on Martin Luther Kings dream, and ignorant because why would you hate someone because of their skin? God didn't hate anyone, because he created all and died for all. I also think that the so called "Black America" needs to be more mature and compose with dignity, because it only makes us look bad as a people and worst in the eyes of those who hate us already. We need to keep Dr. King's dream alive, we owe him that much, he not only changed a lot for our country, but the man did died for it to come together.

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