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George Wallace Stood in a Doorway at the University of Alabama 50 Years Ago Today - US News

George Wallace Stood in a Doorway at the University of Alabama 50 Years Ago Today - US News | civil rights | Scoop.it
US News is a recognized leader in college, grad school, hospital, mutual fund, and car rankings. Track elected officials, research health conditions, and find news you can use in politics, business, health, and education.
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Macon County Confederate Memorial - Tuskegee, Alabama - American Civil War Monuments and Memorials on Waymarking.com

Macon County Confederate Memorial - Tuskegee, Alabama - American Civil War Monuments and Memorials on Waymarking.com | civil rights | Scoop.it
The Macon County Confederate Memorial is located near the courthouse square in historic Tuskegee, Alabama.
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Are school suspensions a civil rights issue?

Are school suspensions a civil rights issue? | civil rights | Scoop.it

"I get the chance to suspend someone at least once a week—easy," Fowler says. "But I take it as a challenge unto myself to think about how I can address the issue without dismissing anyone."

It's an approach more educators are taking, and one Fowler wishes teachers had tried with him in high school.

 

"My own healing process became connected to this redemption," he says. "All the mistakes that authority figures made toward me make me want to do right by my own students."

 

full story: http://bit.ly/1i5jOg3

 

[via MetroActive]

 


Via University of San Francisco
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Timeline: The Civil Rights era

Key moments in U.S. history in the battle for civil rights.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa)
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Kristen Pham's curator insight, November 3, 2013 11:37 PM

A timeline of key events in the Civil Rights movement.

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Why Aren’t Civil Rights Groups Standing Up to the Telecom Giants? | The Nation

Why Aren’t Civil Rights Groups Standing Up to the Telecom Giants? | The Nation | civil rights | Scoop.it

Erika Delgado cut her landline service last December. She had cycled through four different companies since 2000, with each company charging her for calls she didn’t make, services she never signed up for and things she thought were included in her contract. After five years with Pacific Bell, Delgado moved to Verizon because they offered her discounted rates for weekend calls and other services. Though she qualified for Lifeline, a discount program designed to provide basic telephone service for low-income customers, a landslide of unexpected fees and overcharges soon overwhelmed her.

 

“They say they’ll give you discounts but it’s not true,” says Delgado, a 40-year-old single mother of three children living off of the $850 a month she earns from her business selling clothes and electronics at the Mt. Vernon Swap Meet in San Bernardino, California. “They just charge, charge, charge.”

 

Delgado cut her service with Verizon after just a year and a half and moved to AT&T. She decided to enroll in a $20 a month plan that included long-distance calling, an important feature because she frequently makes calls home to Mexico. But after making two 15- to 20-minute calls to Mexico, she was slapped with a $90 charge for the calls. She says AT&T then told her that her plan did not cover long distance to Mexico, and that $200 would cover the cost of the calls and the additional fees.

 

“I had to choose to either feed my kids or pay the bill,” she says. The company sent her to collections and she cut service with AT&T after just 6 months.

 

Now, with a mounting collections bill on her credit report, Delgado doesn’t even consider moving away from her mobile home or applying for a job that requires good credit. She has also given up entirely on getting the landline service she needs at home. Sometimes her cell phone doesn’t get a signal in her home, and when she can’t afford the electricity bill, she has no way to charge the battery. “I am a single mom and my kids have asthma,” she says. “In case of an emergency with my kids, I need reliable telephone service at home to call 911.”

 

Delgado’s decade-long struggle with finding affordable and reliable telephone service is not unique. Her story, and the plight of millions of other low-income people are at the heart of a debate between civil rights groups and public interest advocates who find themselves at opposite ends of a debate about what rules, if any, should rein in companies like AT&T from exploiting consumers like Delgado.

 

In November 2012, in anticipation of moving its telephone service from traditional, wired networks to IP-based phone networks, which transmit voice communications digitally, AT&T filed a petition with the FCC to run test trials of IP-based telephone services. In exchange for expanding these networks, the company is requesting “relief” from critical regulations that apply to wired telephone services. These regulations, which include obligations to provide universal service and state-enforced price and quality regulations, do not currently apply to IP-based telephone service. The petition has garnered critical responses from many public interest groups, including Free Press, the Center for Rural Strategies and the National Hispanic Media Coalition, which are concerned that relaxing these regulations will allow telecom companies to avoid regulating IP-based phone services, leaving them vulnerable to price gouging and poor service quality, with weak access for communities of color and rural residents. (For more about the AT&T petition’s potential impact on underserved communities, click here).

 

Despite public interests groups’ strong warnings that such regulatory relief would disparately impact communities of color, many business-friendly civil rights groups have come out in support of the petition. Groups such as the League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC), the National Urban League and the Asian American Federation—all of which have received millions in private donations from AT&T—have filed comments with the FCC showing strong support of the company’s proposed plan for its transition to IP-based telephone services. None of their comments specify regulations that should apply to those services.

 

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Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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Civil rights groups coalition calls for Washington Redskins to change name

Civil rights groups coalition calls for Washington Redskins to change name | civil rights | Scoop.it
A resolution calls on government entities to end any preferential tax, zoning or other policy treatment.

Via Jacqueline Keeler
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Jacqueline Keeler's curator insight, December 12, 2013 7:12 PM

A coalition of the nation’s leading civil rights organizations took on a new issue Thursday: the name of the Washington Redskins.

The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, a coalition of organizations including the NAACP, the ACLU and the American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee, approved a resolution at its annual meeting in the District that called on the team to change its name and “refrain from the use of any other images, mascots, or behaviors that are or could be deemed harmful or demeaning to Native American cultures or peoples.”

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When the anti-nuisance bill becomes law can I use it to stop Lib Dems claiming they support civil rights?

When the anti-nuisance bill becomes law can I use it to stop Lib Dems claiming they support civil rights? | civil rights | Scoop.it
(not satire - it's the Lib Dems!) The first thing I'm going to do when the coalition's Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Bill becomes law is to take out an injunction against Lib Dems claim...

Via britishroses
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Unrepentant Cop-killer Mumia Abu-Jamal's Lawyer to lead Obama's ...

Unrepentant Cop-killer Mumia Abu-Jamal's Lawyer to lead Obama's ... | civil rights | Scoop.it
President Obama's nominee to be the nation's top civil rights enforcer is a race-obsessed lawyer who tried to permanently free unrepentant cop-killer Mumia Abu-Jamal. Once again, Obama appoints the most vicious radical to ...
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