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Selma to Montgomery March

The Selma to Montgomery marches, also known as Bloody Sunday and the two marches that followed, were marches and protests held in 1965 that marked the political and emotional peak of the American civil rights movement. All three were attempts to march from Selma to Montgomery where the Alabama capitol is located. The marches grew out of the voting rights movement in Selma, launched by local African-Americans who formed the Dallas County Voters League (DCVL). In 1963, the DCVL and organizers from the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) began voter-registration work. When white resistance to black voter registration proved intractable, the DCVL requested the assistance of Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, who brought many prominent civil rights and civic leaders to support voting rights.

 

The first march took place on March 7, 1965 — "Bloody Sunday" — when 600 marchers, protesting the death of Jimmie Lee Jackson and ongoing exclusion from the electoral process, were attacked by state and local police with billy clubs and tear gas. The second march took place March 9; police forced 2,500 protesters to turn around after crossing the Edmund Pettus Bridge.

The third march started March 16. Protected by 2,000 soldiers of the U.S. Army, 1,900 members of the Alabama National Guard under Federal command, and many FBI agents and Federal Marshals, the marchers averaged 10 miles (16 km) a day along U.S. Route 80, known in Alabama as the "Jefferson Davis Highway". The marchers arrived in Montgomery on March 24 and at the Alabama State Capitol on March 25.

The route is memorialized as the Selma To Montgomery Voting Rights Trail, and is a U.S. National Historic Trail.


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George Washington Carver Interpretive Museum - Dothan, Alabama

George Washington Carver Interpretive Museum - Dothan, Alabama | Civil Rights | Scoop.it
The George Washington Carver Interpretive Museum is a historical museum in Dotha

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Tuskegee Heritage Museum

Tuskegee Heritage Museum | Civil Rights | Scoop.it
Check out Tuskegee Heritage Museum's reviews, photos and more on Gogobot

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The Stand in the School House

"The Stand in the Schoolhouse Door took place at Foster Auditorium at the University of Alabama on June 11, 1963.George Wallace, the Governor of Alabama, in a symbolic attempt to keep his inaugural promise of "segregation now, segregation tomorrow, segregation forever" and stop the desegregation of schools, stood at the door of the auditorium to try to block the entry of two black students, Vivian Malone Jones and James Hood.[1]

The incident brought George Wallace into the national spotlight."


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ciara's curator insight, February 6, 2014 2:26 AM

On a scorching june day in 1963, James Hood and Vivian Malone became the first black students to enroll successfully at the university of alabama defying Governor George Wallace Jr.’s symbolic — and vitriolic — ‘‘stand in the schoolhouse door.’’ this is an eample of racial sergregation going on in the south of this time frame

De'Andre King's curator insight, February 2, 2015 9:54 PM

This stand created a very insecure statue between blacks and whites. I feel like the Governor showed a public display of sentiment and he had no right. As a political leader you should not verbally or physically take sides in community disputes, but aim to peacefully negotiate the result.

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Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site | National Parks Conservation Association

Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site | National Parks Conservation Association | Civil Rights | Scoop.it
Tuskegee Airmen National Historic Site tells the story of the first African Americans to train as U.S. Army pilots and ground support during World War II.

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Butler Chapel AME Zion Church

Butler Chapel AME Zion Church was the focal point for a multi-year grass-roots project that united and empowered African Americans, rural and urban, educated and uneducated, to fight for the right to vote. Butler Chapel AME Zion Church, an imposing brick building located on a hill west of downtown Tuskegee, is a prominent landmark in the historically black neighborhood known as Zion Hill. The building, the second church on this site, was constructed about 1877. Originally built in wood, the church was sided with brick in the 1940s. In a 1957 effort to minimize the number of black voters in Tuskegee, Alabama's municipal elections, the state legislature simply redrew the town's political districts, placing Tuskegee Institute and all but a small fraction of black residents outside city limits. To protest this action, Tuskegee's middle-class black community and Macon County's poor black citizens joined forces in a seven-year "Crusade for Citizenship." On June 25, 1957, 3,000 area black residents showed up at Butler Chapel for the first of many weekly mass meetings. Only 500 attendees could fit into the church's small sanctuary; the rest listened outside. Charles Gomillion, a professor at Tuskegee Institute and the driving force of the black Tuskegee Civic Association, urged the crowd to join a "Trade with Friends" boycott of local white merchants. "We are going to buy goods and services from those who help us, from those who make no effort to hinder us, from those who recognize us as first-class citizens," he promised. The boycott ended in early 1961 when city boundaries were returned to their original position, after the Supreme Court ruled that a legislature could not single out an isolated segment of a racial minority for discriminatory treatment.


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Attention-grabbing tourism campaign attracts visitors to experience the Real Lapland

Attention-grabbing tourism campaign attracts visitors to experience the Real Lapland | Civil Rights | Scoop.it

"The Lapland - The North of Finland tourism project is launching the winter season with an attention-grabbing international holiday swap campaign. Who will be the lucky one to step into the shoes of a Lapland northern lights hunter or snowboarder and travel to a visitor-friendly, arctic wilderness in December. The campaign will gain extra publicity from the impressive Northern Lights Bus, bringing the experience of Lapland on wheels to London, Manchester and Birmingham. Anyone can apply for a holiday swap and the campaign can be followed online at onlyinlapland.com/meetthelocals, Facebook and YouTube."


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Birmingham Campaign

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Viola Liuzzo Historic Marker - White Hall - Alabama.travel

Viola Liuzzo Historic Marker - White Hall - Alabama.travel | Civil Rights | Scoop.it
Viola Gregg Liuzzo, a housewife and mother from Detroit, drove alone to Alabama to help with the Selma march after seeing televised reports of the attack at the Edmund Pettus Bridge.

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Viola Liuzzo Historic Marker

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Selma to Montgomery Trail Interpretive Center - White Hall - Alabama.travel

Selma to Montgomery Trail Interpretive Center - White Hall - Alabama.travel | Civil Rights | Scoop.it
Lowndes County Interpretive Center officially opened its doors to the public August 25, 2006. The interpretive center is the first of three proposed along the Selma to Montgomery National Historic Trail.

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Selma to Montgomery Trail Interpretive Center

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Text-Dependent Analysis in Action: Examples From Dr. MLK, Jr.'s Letter from a Birmingham Jail

• In-depth analysis and discussion of Dr. King's Letter from a Birmingham Jail • Explanation of the cognitive requirements of the Standards •  

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Rescooped by Ashley Nicole Kilgore from how did the civil rights movement lead to equal rights in Alabama today?
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Tuskegee Human & Civil Rights Multicultural Center

Tuskegee Human & Civil Rights Multicultural Center | Civil Rights | Scoop.it
Tuskegee Human & Civil Rights Multicultural Center

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Rescooped by Ashley Nicole Kilgore from Civil Rights PBL
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Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott [ushistory.org]

Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott [ushistory.org] | Civil Rights | Scoop.it
Rosa Parks and the Montgomery Bus Boycott

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Hunter Howard's curator insight, February 6, 2014 2:48 PM

The Montgomery Bus Boycott began the long process for MLK's many ventures that ended up putting him in the Birmingham jail.

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Tuskegee Confederate Monument - Tuskegee - Alabama.travel

Tuskegee Confederate Monument - Tuskegee - Alabama.travel | Civil Rights | Scoop.it
Monument erected in 1906 by the United Daughters of the Confederacy in memory of Confederate soldiers from Macon County. Scene of 1960s civil rights activities.

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Harris Barrett School - Tuskegee - Alabama.travel

Harris Barrett School - Tuskegee - Alabama.travel | Civil Rights | Scoop.it
Built in 1903 by students of the Tuskegee Normal School, later named Tuskegee Institute and now Tuskegee University. The students made the bricks by hand and built the two room school under the directions of Dr. Booker T. Washington. It was constructed for the descendants of slaves. Located on three acres of land and restored to its originality, today it is a developing historic museum that tells the story of early school life and living in rural Alabama. The school houses the exposition of local African Americans education and achievements from the slave ships to the space ships, highlighting those of Tuskegee Univertity who help develop the NASA project of growing food in space. Tours daily by request.

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The 16th Street Baptist Church bombing

The 16th Street Baptist Church bombing | Civil Rights | Scoop.it
On Sunday September 15th 1963 the Ku Klux Klan bombed the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama, killing four girls: Addie Mae Collins, age 14 (1949-1963) Cynthia Wesley, age 14 (1949-1...

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16th Street Baptist Church

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Community Village Sites's curator insight, September 18, 2013 1:31 PM


There is an excellent Spike Lee documentary called "4 Little Girls" filled with many heart wrenching scenes and interviews of the parents, family and friends.


One of the most heart-rending and poignant scenes is when the father of one of the murdered girls shows the cinematographer an absolutely perfect photo he took of his beautiful happy daughter hugging a white doll as close as she can to her head as her and the doll pose for the camera.


The beautiful innocence of childhood contrasted alongside the hate and violence of racist adults is emotionally overwhelming. Viewing a happy photo from a grieving parent made me sad and sick to my stomach at the absurdity of the hate and violence in this world.


It's not enough to say that one man or four men were sociopathic killers. The whole U.S. culture allows those sick and twisted people to be members of our society virtually unchecked.


@getgln

Trey Turner's curator insight, January 17, 2014 1:12 PM

Church Bombing

Courtlandt Cobb's curator insight, January 30, 2015 2:32 PM

We picked this picture because its shows how the KKK bombed the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, Alabama and in the outline it stated that they killed 4 little black girls.

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Civil Rights Memorial | Southern Poverty Law Center

Civil Rights Memorial | Southern Poverty Law Center | Civil Rights | Scoop.it

The Civil Rights Memorial honors the achievements and memory of those who died during the Civil Rights Movement, a period framed by the momentous Brown v. Board decision in 1954 and the assassination of Dr.


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Civil Rights Memorial Center

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Tent Cities Popping Up All Around New Jersey - Camden Tent City

Tent Cities Popping Up All Around New Jersey - Camden Tent City | Civil Rights | Scoop.it
The Financial Armageddon Blog tracks the Truth Movement , The investigative journalists The conspiracy theorists like Harry Dent Gerald Celente Steve Quayle Rush Limbaugh Michael Savage Glenn Beck Alex Jones Tim Rifat Max Igan Benjamin Fulford Lindsey...

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tent city

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Norie Roubin's curator insight, August 2, 2013 1:19 PM
Tent Cities Popping Up All Around New Jersey - Camden Tent City
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Dignitaries gather for civil rights pioneer McCain's funeral - Charlotte Observer

Dignitaries gather for civil rights pioneer McCain's funeral - Charlotte Observer | Civil Rights | Scoop.it
Charlotte Observer Dignitaries gather for civil rights pioneer McCain's funeral Charlotte Observer McCain was among four North Carolina A&T State University students whose February 1960 sit-in at a whites-only lunch counter in Greensboro helped...
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