Civil Engineering 101
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Civil Engineering 101
Civil Engineering has always been an eye opening topic for me. So I thought I'd share with you cool different project and just generally what is is.
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Simple Physics - Engineering Challenges on Your iPad

Simple Physics - Engineering Challenges on Your iPad | Civil Engineering 101 | Scoop.it
Simple Physics is an iPad app that presents users with fun and challenging engineering problems. The app has twelve challenges that progress in difficulty as you move through the app. The premise o...
Sophia Laino's insight:

Now that I'm no longer doing this for a project, I can give a more in depth reaction for each scoop. I can tell you from experience that this is one of my favorite apps. As you can see from my page, I'm really into engineering. This app is perfect for just that. I haven't updated the app in a while but I can promise that it really challenges you and over the levels it gets increasingly harder. However, it is definitely worth the $1.99 that it costs to buy. So go buy it and enjoy!!!

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World Book

The World Book web site offers an encyclopedia, dictionary, atlas, homework help, study aids, and curriculum guides. World Book is publisher of the World Book Encyclopedia.
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There are many important civil engineers in the world. One of those important civil engineers is George Washington Goethals. George Goethals was not only a civil engineer but he was also a army officer. He grew up in Brooklyn. George Washington Goethals worked on and directed the construction of the Panama Canal. He also help create the Adamson Eight-hour law. The Adamson Eight-Hour law said that the railroad workers who worked in interstate commerce only had to work eight-hour days. Also, George Goethals worked in New Jersey as a highway engineer. When George Goethals retired from being a army officer, he created a firm of engineers. These engineers worked on irrigation projects and the inner harbor of New Orleans. He also was the top consulting engineer of the port authority in New York and New Jersey. George Washington Goethals is a very inspiring figure in Civil Engineering, especially for me. I also am growing up in Brooklyn. He has worked on so many different big projects and he has won so many awards for what he did. He is definitely an icon that I look up to. He was able to do so many different things in his life which is really cool.

 

 

"George Washington Goethals." World Book Online. World Book, n.d. Web. 02 Apr. 2013.
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Olympic stadium - Institution of Civil Engineers

Olympic stadium - Institution of Civil Engineers | Civil Engineering 101 | Scoop.it
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The Olympic stadium is another big civil engineering project. It’s the 2012 Olympic stadium and it was built for the London games. However, due to complaining about the underuse of Olympic stadiums after being built, the chairs and the stands in the stadium will be used again at different sports venues. The construction and design of the stadium was built for athletes. The goal of the stadium was to make it feel like it was an open feel, rather than being confined. Even the structure of the stadium has athletes in mind. For example, the stadium was built so that it looks like it rises out of the ground. Also, the roof sections are set up in a specific array to act as the muscles on an athlete. I thought this article and stadium are really cool. I think that it was really smart of the engineers to keep the athletes in mind. I mean we are going to see them play and compete in a sport so why not make it as comfortable as possible. Its articles like these that open your eyes to what you’re capable of and all the things you can construct.

 

 

"Olympic Stadium." ICE. Institution of Civil Engineers, n.d. Web. 02 Apr. 2013.

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The Dynamic Tower - Institution of Civil Engineers

The Dynamic Tower - Institution of Civil Engineers | Civil Engineering 101 | Scoop.it
Sophia Laino's insight:

One big civil engineering project would be the Dynamic Tower. It is the first building that is able to be in motion. Each floor of the building will be able to make a 360 degree rotation. Each rotation will take about an hour and a half. Each owner will be able to set the speed they want. The tower is the first skyscraper that was made of prefabricated parts. But because it was made of prefabricated parts the process of building it was faster and it saved a great amount of money. Not only does the building move but it is also able to generate electricity for itself and its surrounding buildings. That alone makes it the first building designed to be self powered. The building is built of of a tubular concrete core which is layered with triangular floors. The triangular pieces enable the floors to move at different speeds which creates many different shapes of the building. I like this building, a lot. I think that it is one of the most impressive buildings I've ever seen. I thought it was really cool how it moves. Also all the different shapes it makes is really cool. It's like you can create your own pattern.

 

 

"The Dynamic Tower." ICE. Institution of Civil Engineers, n.d. Web. 02 Apr. 2013

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Ericson Hernandez's comment, April 1, 2013 4:59 PM
Sophia managed to pick a very interesting article for her topic on Civil Engineering 101. Her interest in the topic allows her to really connect to the article giving the readers an interesting overall summary of the article and how she feels about it. Many people do not realize some of the fun things that Civil Engineering involves but Sophia was able to find an article that shows that Civil Engineering can be something of interest for everyone. I was fascinated with the article Sophia did about a building with the ability to move enabling it to power itself and other buildings around it. Sophia managed to explain some details about the building that may be confusing to someone who has little knowledge about Civil Engineering which is great because it allows the reader to be interested in what she has to say rather than be bored and confused. Sophia also talked about what she thought was fascinating about the skyscraper which shows what a strong interest she has in this topic. I find the tower to be truly fascinating and like Sophia I hope to see it one day for myself. Overall Sophia did a wonderful job with her article and gave her readers something interesting to know about new technological advances in Civil Engineering 101.
Maahnoor Shah's comment, April 2, 2013 9:08 PM
This article was extremely interesting and I am so glad that I read this article and Sophia’s brilliant insight. This building, the Dynamic Tower, is such an amazing application of civil engineering and it fascinated me. The beauty of this building is that it is the first building that is able to move. It has a strong concrete core with triangular floors that can move at varying speeds and can create a multitude of different shapes. What enable this building to be in motion are the 360-degree rotations of each floor, which will take approximately an hour and a half. Another cool first about this building is that it is the first building that is to be built entirely of custom made prefabricated parts. This “Fisher Method” requires less workers and less time for the building to be built, each floor taking about seven days. This building is great for the environment; it has the ability to generate electricity for itself and some surrounding buildings. There will be about 79 wind turbines in this 80-story building; it will be a true green power plant. Besides from loving the article about the building itself, I loved Sophia’s enthusiasm about this article and evidently Civil Engineering itself.
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Civil Works: Performance of Taum Sauk Upper Reservoir Dam During Refill - HydroWorld

Civil Works: Performance of Taum Sauk Upper Reservoir Dam During Refill - HydroWorld | Civil Engineering 101 | Scoop.it
Sophia Laino's insight:

This article was about the restoration of the Taum Sauk Upper Reservoir Dam, in particular the refilling of it. The original Taum Sauk Upper Reservoir Dam was constructed and built in 1963 but it failed and broke in December of 2005. When it broke it let out hundreds of thousands of gallons of water out and it just missed an active highway. Eventually the broken upper dam was removed and completely rebuilt in 2006. The rebuilding of it ended in 2010. While the dam was being refilled there were many tests going on. In particular, a performance test given by Paul C. Rizzo Associates, Inc. A bunch of other tests were provided to make sure that there wasn't any leakage, alignment changes, and any deformations of the dam. Also the different pressures were tested. Some of the instruments used were flumes, Piezometers, and surface monuments. I think that what interested me in this so much was that this wasn't the first time it was being done. I liked that the original dam broke, but no one gave up hope. Everyone just got back up and built a new one. So the refilling of it was kind of like a honorable moment.

 

 

Deible, Jared, John Osterle, Charles Weatherford, Tom Hollenkamp, and Matt Frerking. "Performance of Taum Sauk Upper Reservoir Dam During Refill." Hydro World. PennWell Corporation, 01 Apr. 2011. Web. 02 Apr. 2013.

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Occupation Profile - America's Career InfoNet

Occupation Profile - America's Career InfoNet | Civil Engineering 101 | Scoop.it
America's Career InfoNet helps people make better, more informed career decisions. Check education, knowledge, skills and abilities, and licensing against requirements for most occupations.
Sophia Laino's insight:

To be a Civil Engineer you must have certain skills, abilities, and knowledge. Most of the time civil engineers are in charge of construction of different structures like tunnels, bridges, buildings, and roads. Well first off, civil engineers need to go to school for engineering. But they also need to specialize in design, constructing, mathematics, and the English language. They’re going to have to be able to use their heads and think outside of the box. They have to using problem solving skills, their judgment, and critical thinking. One of the big things you learn in geometry is inductive and deductive reasoning. Those two abilities are also used for civil engineering. A lot of the job is visualization and applying all the possible scenarios. Then just problem solving and giving clear instructions. Also as a civil engineer you have to be able to use certain tools such as compasses, levels, and scales. I really look forward to becoming a civil engineer. I find the job really interesting and all the requirements are extremely fair. Math happens to be my favorite subject, so I think that it will be a good field to go into.

 

 

"Civil Engineers." America's Career InfoNet. U. S. Department of Labor, Employment and Training Administration, n.d. Web. 02 Apr. 2013.

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The Messina Bridge - Institution of Civil Engineers

Sophia Laino's insight:

The Messina Bridge is a big civil engineering project. The bridge connects Sicily and the mainland of Italy. When finished the Messina Bridge will be the longest suspension bridge that has ever been built. Right now the world’s longest suspension bridge is the Akashi-Kaikyo Bridge. The Messina Bridge, however, will be about 60 percent longer. The bridge will have twelve lanes for cars and trucks and then two others in the center for trains. Traveling time for these two places used to take up to twelve hours. But now the time is cut down only to minutes. Construction of the Messina Bridge began in 2006. But then the construction had stopped in 2008. But construction began once again in 2008. Many people are concerned about whether the bridge can withstand earthquakes and other problems. I picked this article because I was really interested in the bridge. I was interested in the Messina Bridge not only because of the process but because my family comes from and lives in Sicily. The construction and the facts about the bridge are also really interesting. I would love to be able to build something like this one day.

 

 

"Institution of Civil Engineers." The Messina Bridge. Institution of Civil Engineers, n.d. Web. 02 Apr. 2013.

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What is Civil Engineering? | Civil Engineering

Civil engineering is arguably the oldest engineering discipline. It deals with the built environment and can be dated to the first time someone placed a roof over his or her head or laid a tree trunk across a river to make it easier to get across.
Sophia Laino's insight:

Civil Engineering is more than most people think of it. There are many different sub groups within the field that expand it to almost everything you encounter within your day. The different groups range from structural engineering all the way to transportation engineering. Both of those types play a large role in our everyday life. Not only does Civil Engineering just deal with the solids in our life such as building and bridges but it also deals with our water systems. When we turn on our water faucet we don't really think about it. It's sort of just a normal task for us. We don't think about where it comes from and how is it being cleaned. But it is because of the Civil Engineers that it is clean and it is coming directly to us. I guess that is why I want to be a Civil Engineer. Because no matter what you’re doing in the field you are always helping someone. Also, that even if the person doesn’t know that you are behind it you are always able to see what you accomplished. There is always a reward at the end of the day whether it be a new building or a new hydroelectric dam.

 

 

"What Is Civil Engineering?" Civil Engineering. Columbia University, n.d. Web. 27 Mar. 2013.

 

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