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"Recovering from Hurricane Sandy in Coney Island" | Brooklyn Storms Back, BRIC Arts | Media | Bklyn

Luna Park's clean-up video in HD....

 

Recovering from Hurricane Sandy in Coney Island

Posted on November 20, 2012 by bricmedia

From YouTube user: lunaparkNYC

 

Filed under: BCAT TV Network, BK Storms Back, BRIC Arts|Media|Bklyn, Brooklyn Independent TV Tagged: | Coney Island, Hurricane Sandy, Sandy Volunteer

--- original post at http://briccommunitymedia.wordpress.com/2012/11/20/recovering-from-hurricane-sandy-in-coney-island/ ---

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The Case for Unity Among Non-Profit, Community, and Public Media | Josh Stearns, PBS Mediashift

The Case for Unity Among Non-Profit, Community, and Public Media | Josh Stearns, PBS Mediashift | Civic Engagement | Scoop.it

The radically shifting landscape of media and technology has sparked a renaissance in non-profit and public media in the United States. As a perfect storm of economic and technological changes shakes the foundation of commercial media, journalists, funders, and local citizens are looking to public interest-oriented, mission-driven news organizations as a critical part of the solution. People who might never have considered a non-profit business model before -- like longtime journalists and tech entrepreneurs -- are launching vibrant, non-profit startups across the country.

 

Making the Case for Unity

 

A new report by Free Press argues, however, that despite all of this attention, non-profit media has yet to become greater than the sum of its parts. They serve different, albeit intersecting, audiences. Their membership and funding varies. They focus on different topics or geographies. Having a diverse media system is important, but too often these groups also define themselves through these differences. Surveying the different models, missions and approaches in the non-profit journalism sector makes it feel less like a unified whole, and more like a collection of parts.

 

The report, "Greater than the Sum," argues that we need to begin constructing a new identity for non-profit journalism and media in America, one that illustrates the central role these institutions play in our nation. In addition, we must examine the media policies that have for too long served to divide non-profit media by platform instead of connecting them around purpose.

 

The Changing Face of Non-commercial Media >>>

 

--- more at orginal post http://www.pbs.org/mediashift/2012/10/the-case-for-unity-among-non-profit-community-and-public-media277.html ---

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Community Media Pioneer George Stoney Dies at 96 | Democracy Now!

Community Media Pioneer George Stoney Dies at 96 | Democracy Now! | Civic Engagement | Scoop.it
The pioneering media activist George Stoney has died at the age of 96. Stoney’s career spanned more than half a century, producing film and television that focused on issues of racial justice, social responsibility, community and freedom of speech.

 

George Stoney: "I started in the state of Georgia with a little educational program, and before long, I found I was making films for people who should be making them themselves, but at that time, as you know, it was film and it was much more complicated. Now, with this user-friendly equipment, there’s no reason why people should not make their own programs.

 

And now we have an outlet with public access. We look on cable as a way of encouraging public action, not just access. Social change comes with a combination of use of media and people getting out on the streets or getting involved. And we find that if people make programs together and put them on the local channel, that gets them involved."

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George Stoney, Father of Public Access R.I.P. | Center for Media and Democracy

George Stoney, Father of Public Access R.I.P. | Center for Media and Democracy | Civic Engagement | Scoop.it

July 12, 2012

 

Dear Friends,

 

It is with a heavy heart that I share the news that George Stoney, the founder of our movement, unflagging champion of free speech, open media and opportunity for all, has died in his home in New York City this evening. George was well into his 90's and actively producing movies and supporting access advocates until the end.

 

George first came to Vermont in 1985 to help us train community members during the early years of CCTV and, then, Channel 8 in Chittenden County. He brought his bag of VHS tapes to show what others were doing and reminded us that our work is less about media making and more about community building--a message he never failed to deliver at the countless access events and conferences that he attended.

 

George was brilliant, gracious, untiring and a deep inspiration to us all. He traveled and had friends around the world, was recognized with high honors, made dozens of films and taught thousands of students. Last year, I attended a class at NYU which featured footage from the Canadian Film Board's Challenge for Change project, which first convinced him of the power of video to animate social change. Still teaching at 95!!

 

You can read more about his illustrious career here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_C._Stoney

 

Thanks to George and our collective hard work, we have forged a vital community resource that can make our state a better place for all people. Opportunity and equity. The seeds and fruit of our efforts.

 

My best and thanks for your work, in George's honor,

 

Lauren-Glenn

 

[ click headline or photo for original post, with video ]

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Wilmington NC: Will Wilmington get its public access channel back? | Amanda Greene, WilmingtonFAVS: Faith & Values

Wilmington NC: Will Wilmington get its public access channel back? | Amanda Greene, WilmingtonFAVS: Faith & Values | Civic Engagement | Scoop.it

~ Wilmington's public access channel ended in 2009, but area clergy and community leaders are trying to get it started again. ~

 

If a local government can’t administer a public access channel, it can appoint a third party to do it for them. North Carolina has 24 public access channels, and third parties run 10 of them.

 

In Wilmington, Moore and other area clergy and community leaders asked the nonprofit Southeastern Alliance for Community Change to get involved as a third party administrator of a Wilmington public access channel.

 

Steve Lee, a board member with SEACC, said the group’s involvement was about “giving a voice to the voiceless.” (Lee is also a contributor for WilmingtonFAVS.)

 

A Wilmington public access channel could also provide opportunities for young filmmakers and communications students at Cape Fear Community College and the University of North Carolina Wilmington, said Bill Bolduc, a UNCW associate professor of communications.

 

SEACC wrote a business plan, built a web site for SEACC TV, presented it to City Manager Sterling Cheatham and asked to make a presentation at a future Wilmington City Council meeting.

 

In late April, the group got a formal review of its proposal. Cheatham prepared a 40-page report for city council and Mayor Bill Saffo. Members of SEACC also met with the mayor about the proposal.

 

[...]

 

The city manager’s final recommendation to city council was to “focus on other issues” because of the possible legal concerns with the channel.

 

But SEACC hasn’t given up. The group is trying to gather enough petition signatures to make a full presentation before city council.

 

“We feel like, now, it’s more an issue of political will,” said Bishop Edward Williams, pastor of Prayer & Bible Church of God for All People and an organizer of the SEACC.TV effort.

 

Now, Moore uses his equipment to broadcast his messages on his church’s YouTube channel because he can’t afford the fees of an on demand cable channel.

 

“It’s a community thing. It’s not only for churches but for anyone who has the ability or desire to broadcast their ideas other than through cable,” he added. “And we have denied the citizens that type of broadcast.”

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Participate in the Occupation of Public Access TV! | #OWS - Live TV , Facebook

Participate in the Occupation of Public Access TV! | #OWS - Live TV , Facebook | Civic Engagement | Scoop.it
#OWS - Live TV wrote a note titled Participate in the Occupation of Public Access TV!

 

This show is part of the Occupy movement's coverage of itself. We are an all-volunteer team of citizen journalists using public access TV to give the public in-depth and close-up news of the Occupy movement. Like Occupy itself, we are open to the participation of anyone who wishes to help. We are seeking help both in the in-studio production of the show on Thursday mornings, and in the day-to-day preparation of stories and videos for the week's show. The latter work can be done at one's home computer, and any donated time, even fifteen minutes, would be appreciated.

 

How can you help us prepare this show, from your own computer, even if you have no experience in TV production? Just help us keep on top of the Occupy news. There is so much going on in this movement that simply keeping track of it takes up a lot of our time. We keep a list of upcoming events and possible stories to cover in this Google document: http://bit.ly/OccupyLeads .

 

If you want to suggest a story, event, or video that's not listed there, please add it in. It's a very straightforward document, and there are detailed instructions on the tab "How To Use This Document". If you spend any time tracking down Occupy news, please share it with us there, and feel free to use it as a news source yourself!

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Albuquerque NM: Free Speech Not For Sale | Lora Lucero, Democracy for New Mexico

Albuquerque NM: Free Speech Not For Sale | Lora Lucero, Democracy for New Mexico | Civic Engagement | Scoop.it

The US foreign policy of using sanctions against Iraq in the 1980s-1990s and currently against Iran is designed to be the kinder, gentler, antiseptic tool of aggression. I heard last week from Richard Becker (ANSWER Coalition) about the impact of our sanctions on Iraq. More than 500,000 Iraqi children died as a result of these sanctions. And now we are following that same path in Iran.

 

Where was Becker speaking? Unless you attended the presentation at UNM on Saturday afternoon, you only would have heard him or seen the video “Genocide by Sanctions” if you watched the IndyMedia show on Albuquerque’s public access TV Ch. 27 on Thursday evening (7-8 pm). The mainstream corporate stations did not cover this serious discussion. It didn’t fit within the sanitized commercial programming of KOB, KOAT, KASA or KRQE. The Albuquerque Journal certainly didn’t cover it.

 

Albuquerque’s public access channels 26 and 27 have been run efficiently and economically for thirty-plus years by Quote-Unquote but now city government may lock the doors and turn off the lights. There is a very real threat that the community will lose its public access channels, the only media that provides free studios, equipment and training to the public so that our voices can be heard, and the stories we care about can be aired.

 

I naively thought public access channels were guaranteed by some FCC regulation, but in recent weeks I’ve learned there is a nationwide campaign by phone companies --- including AT&T Inc, Verizon Communications Inc, and Qwest Communications International Inc. --- to move into the cable market. They have their sights on PEG (public, education and government) channels. Albuquerque is part of a much larger battle being waged in Los Angeles; Troy, NY; Tampa, FL; and elsewhere around the country.

 

The corporate takeover is a bit convoluted, but here’s the skinny as I understand it today. Comcast wants the cable TV channels which were reserved for public use in the ABQ/Comcast 2002 Franchise Agreement. That agreement doesn’t expire until October 2017, and it was codified as a city ordinance. That means Mayor Berry and the City Administration cannot simply turn the keys over to Comcast; the City Council must approve any amendments to the agreement first. The battle is currently in the city council chambers where free speech advocates have eloquently pled their case. The final decision is expected Monday, May 7.

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Paid Political Ads on Non-Commerical Radio/TV | Aaron Reed, Fried Bagels Consulting

Paid Political Ads on Non-Commerical Radio/TV | Aaron Reed, Fried Bagels Consulting | Civic Engagement | Scoop.it

On April 12th, the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals delivered a verdict on Minority Television Project, Inc v. FCC. And it's a doozy. Basically, the court invalidated a long-held rule that non-commercial broadcasters cannot air paid "political ads" or paid "issue ads." So now they can.

 

I'll pause a moment to let that sink in.

 

If upheld, it's potentially a game-changer, on the level of the Citizens United case, for the entire broadcasting industry. But there's a lot of questions and confusion surrounding the decision, and the consensus is that nobody really knows for sure just yet what the final impacts will be.

 

This article is an attempt to collate several useful facts, opinions and other tidbits of information into a centralized resource. I'll update it as we learn more going forward. Right at the outset, I'll remind everyone that IANAL: I Am Not A Lawyer and that a lot of what I'm writing about here is speculation. Informed speculation, maybe. Speculation based on facts, perhaps. But speculation nevertheless. I encourage anyone who has hard evidence or solid facts that confirm or refute any of the speculation to leave their notes in the Comments and I'll update as we go along! :)

 

Much, much more after the jump...

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About Occupy Boston TV | Jess Schumann, Open Media Boston

About Occupy Boston TV | Jess Schumann, Open Media Boston | Civic Engagement | Scoop.it

Occupy Boston TV is a working group of Occupy Boston. We gather video around the concerns of the movement to share online and on public access TV stations around the country. To learn more about this group, please visit www.occupyboston.org/tv/

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Supporters hope bill can save public access TV | Bill O'Driscoll, USA Today

Supporters hope bill can save public access TV | Bill O'Driscoll, USA Today | Civic Engagement | Scoop.it
Supporters hope a bill before Congress can help restore their local government, education, cultural and other TV programming.

 

As state funding for community access TV operations continues to wither across the USA, supporters are looking hopefully at a bill before Congress that would help to restore their local government, education, cultural and other programming.

 

As many as 1,800 Public, Educational and Government (PEG) operations have closed and funding has been slashed in 20 states as franchise agreements expire, according to the advocacy group American Community Television in Washington. Supporters see the proposed Community Access Preservation Act, or CAP Act, as a way to salvage their mission.

 

The legislation would restore communities' ability to get PEG funding and loosen restrictions in the Cable Communications Act of 1984 on how public access channels can spend money, according to the advocacy group Alliance for Community Media. The bill is pending in the House Subcommittee on Communications and Technology. No hearing date has been set.

 

"It would make a huge difference," said Mary Cardona, executive director of Wisconsin Community Media, which has 60 station members. "Our Madison station is being run with volunteers now. They don't know how long they'll survive."

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Malden MA: Five Things You Need to Know About Patch's New Live TV Show | Chris Caesar, Malden Patch

Malden MA: Five Things You Need to Know About Patch's New Live TV Show | Chris Caesar, Malden Patch | Civic Engagement | Scoop.it
We're going live at 2 p.m. today with our debut panel discussion program: "Patch Presents...Is Malden Center at a Turning Point?

 

Sure, a lot of readers talk a big game in our comments section - but when Malden Patch brings some major players together for a live panel discussion, will you be there to hold their feet to the fire?

 

Malden Patchis joining forces with Malden Access Television to bring you what we hope will be a series of engaging and informative discussions about issues important to residents – for our first episode, we'll discuss downtown development with some key officials.

 

Here's the five things you need to know about “Patch Presents...Is Malden Center at a Turning Point?”, our new television special.

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Bringing Broadcaster Public Files into the 21st Century | Tom Glaisyer, New America Foundation

Bringing Broadcaster Public Files into the 21st Century | Tom Glaisyer, New America Foundation | Civic Engagement | Scoop.it

In exchange for exclusive use of spectrum broadcasters took on public interest obligations. However, viewing the public files that document how broadcasters have fulfilled on that commitment can hardly be considered accessible when compared to 21st century e-Government and transparency norms.

 

As part of our effort to understand the issue, we have visited a number of broadcasters and examined their public files - a task that currently requires visiting a station between Monday and Friday. Requesting a copy can result in costs of up-to 25 cents a page. People who have been following this issue at the FCC know this might change in the immediate future. The FCC is proposing to bring the broadcasters in to the 21st century and require they post public file information online including the contents of the political file.

 

Last week the broadcasters made the bizarre claim that this move to share rate information online would force them to reveal “sensitive pricing data.” The information is already available for anyone to inspect, though only between the hours of 9 and 5 in person at their offices and photocopied at the readers expense. Putting it online is just asking the broadcasters to enter the 21st century and make good on the public interest obligations broadcast stations took on in exchange for a government grant to use publicly owned spectrum for free.

 

To help people understand what this means we have posted online the files we have collected directly and from others who have visited stations and shared them with us. Most of these are program issues lists but we have a couple of political files that we have obtained where there are some examples of political guidelines, rate cards and invoices. (If you want some guidance on how to collect files Free Press has a How-to Guide - http://www.freepress.net/how-to-inspect-public-political-files - and if you have questions please do email me at glaisyer@newamerica.net. I am very happy to upload files others have collected. See also ProPublica's similar efforts here - http://www.propublica.org/article/if-tv-stations-wont-post-their-data-on-political-ads-we-will.)

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Who’s buying your TV station? | Bill Moyers & Michael Winship, Salon.com

Who’s buying your TV station? | Bill Moyers & Michael Winship, Salon.com | Civic Engagement | Scoop.it
Big media groups stand to make billions on political ads this year. We should at least know who's paying for them.

 

The FCC, the Federal Communications Commission, which is supposed to make sure the broadcasters don’t completely get away with highway or, rather, airwave robbery has proposed to the broadcasting cartel that stations post on the Web the names of the billionaires, and front organizations – many of them super PACs — paying for campaign ads. It’s simplicity itself: Give citizens access online to find out quickly and directly who’s buying our elections. Hardly an unreasonable request, given how much cash the broadcasters make from their free use of the airwaves.

 

But the broadcasting industry’s response has been a simple, declarative “Not on your life!” It would cost too much money, they claim. Speaking on their behalf, Robert McDowell, currently the only Republican commissioner on the FCC – the other one left to take a job with media monolith Comcast — said the proposal is likely “to be a jobs destroyer” by distracting station employees from doing their regular work. The party line also has been sounded by Jerald Fritz, senior vice president of Allbritton Communications, who told the FCC that making the information available on the Internet “would ultimately lead to a Soviet-style standardization of the way advertising should be sold as determined by the government.” We’re not making this up.

 

Steven Waldman, who was lead author of the report that led to the FCC’s online proposal, quotes a letter from the deans of twelve of our best journalism schools: “Broadcast news organizations depend on, and consistently call for, robust open-record regimes for the institutions they cover; it seems hypocritical for broadcasters to oppose applying the same principles to themselves.”

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Video The Vote 2012: Ensures timely, complete, & accurate reporting of voter suppression & election irregularities by organizing citizen journalists to document elections in their communities

Video The Vote 2012: Ensures timely, complete, & accurate reporting of voter suppression & election irregularities by organizing citizen journalists to document elections in their communities | Civic Engagement | Scoop.it

Video the Vote ensures timely, complete, and accurate reporting of voter suppression and election irregularities by organizing citizen journalists to document elections in their communities.

 

Join the thousands who are documenting the election in their community this year. If you encounter a problem at your polling place be prepared to use your smart phone to document what is happening and then share that content on your YouTube, Twitter, Instagram or Ustream account by using #VideoTheVote so our team can follow ...

 

http://videothevote.org/

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Broadcasters put political ad buy files online today | Keenan Steiner, Sunlight Foundation Reporting Group

Broadcasters put political ad buy files online today | Keenan Steiner,  Sunlight Foundation Reporting Group | Civic Engagement | Scoop.it

[ Red shows TV markets left out if the FCC orders stations in the top 50 to post political ad buys. ]

 

With the 2012 election three months away, stations in some of the nation's biggest television markets will start uploading information on political ad buys to the Internet for the first time today, bringing out of the dark ages at least some information on who's behind political ads.

 

The move represents a major victory for open government groups that have been fighting for more than a decade to get the information contained in television filing cabinets on the Internet, but it does come with considerable limitations. The Sunlight Foundation, along with the Free Press and other partners, is seeking help to overcome them so that we can provide fuller disclosure on who is trying to influence your vote before you cast it.

 

The need is particularly urgent this year because of changes in campaign finance laws that have facilitated millions in political spending by outside groups. Many of them not required to disclose donors and, in some cases, not required to register with the Federal Election Commission or even, depending on the timing and nature of the spending, to disclose the fact that they are making political expenditures. More about how to help below.

 

Limitations of the FCC rule

 

The Federal Communications Commission rule requiring the online disclosures, approved in April over fierce opposition from the nation's broadcasters, only applies to stations affiliated with four major networks -- ABC, CBS, Fox and NBC -- in the top 50 television markets. But some of the biggest markets, like New York, Los Angeles and Chicago, are in states unlikely to see a lot of political spending, while many markets in political battleground states remain unaffected by the FCC order.

 

Even for stations covered by the rule, ad buys made prior to Thursday don't have to be posted online, meaning that records of millions of dollars already spent, much of it by groups do not disclose donors, will still be gathering dust in station file cabinets. Stations have six months to post records of those ads. And stations outside the scope of the FCC order -- those not affiliated with the four major networks (including Spanish-language stations) and those not in the 50 top broadcast markets -- don't have to begin posting their public files online for another two years.

 

In addition, the files that the FCC does post this year will be in PDF format. That means users seeking to track the spending of particular interest groups or campaigns potentially will have to sift through hundreds of files.

 

William Lake, the chief of the FCC's media bureau, called putting the files in machine-readable format -- which would enable easy searching, sorting and downloading -- a "long-term goal." For now, the agency would rely on third parties to "actively develop ways, including crowdsearching, to make documents more searchable."

 

How you can help

 

That's why the Sunlight Foundation and its partners have launched Political Ad Sleuth - http://politicaladsleuth.sunlightfoundation.com/. The goal is to create am easy-to-use, searchable and sortable online database on political TV ad buys -- both those posted by the FCC and those that are not. We are seeking volunteers -- journalists, citizen journalists and interested citizens -- to help with this project.

 

original post --- http://reporting.sunlightfoundation.com/2012/broadcasters-start-putting-political-tv-ads-online-today/ ---

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Alliance for Community Media Mourns Passing of George Stoney, Community Media Pioneer | Alliance for Community Media

Alliance for Community Media Mourns Passing of George Stoney, Community Media Pioneer | Alliance for Community Media | Civic Engagement | Scoop.it

(McLean, VA, July 13, 2012) – The Alliance for Community Media (ACM) is saddened at the recent passing of George Stoney, a visionary and founder of the community media movement. George’s list of contributions to both public access and to the entire media industry is long and exceptional.

 

“George has been a wonderful mentor and role model to several generations of journalists, filmmakers, and free speech advocates,” said ACM Executive Director Sylvia Strobel. “His loss will be keenly felt by many in the media industry. We express our deepest sympathies to George’s family and friends.”

 

Stoney, who was 96, was a free-lance writer, documentary filmmaker and advocate of participatory media – often being cited as the Father of Public Access Television. Stoney served on the Board of Directors for the Manhattan Neighborhood Network (MNN) and the Alliance for Community Media (ACM), and continued to team-teach a course at NYU Tisch School of the Arts.

 

Each year, ACM presents “The George Stoney – Dirk Koning Award” to an organization or individual who has made an outstanding contribution to championing the growth and experience of humanistic community communications.

 

http://www.allcommunitymedia.org/latest-news/alliance-for-community-media-mourns-passing-of-george-stoney-community-media-pioneer

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July 1, 1916: Happy Birthday, George Stoney! ~ "Organ Donation" (A Happy Collaborator)

This scene about organ donation and propaganda is from a documentary portrait of the filmmaker, teacher and media activist George Stoney. Directed by Mike Hazard...

 

George C. Stoney (born July 1, 1916) is a professor of film and cinema studies at New York University (NYU), and a pioneer in the field of documentary film. Stoney directed several influential films including All My Babies and How the Myth Was Made. He is considered as the father of public-access television.

 

George Stoney studied journalism at NYU and the University of North Carolina. He has worked as a photo intelligence officer in World War II, for the Farm Security Administration an information officer, and as a freelance journalist. In 1946, he joined the Southern Educational Film Service as writer and director. He started his own production company in 1950, and has made over 40 documentary films on wide ranging subjects. All My Babies, one of his first films, received numerous awards and was inducted into the National Film Registry in 2002.

 

Stoney was also the director of the Challenge for Change project, a socially active documentary production wing of the National Film Board of Canada from 1966-70.

 

With Red Burns, Stoney co-founded the Alternate Media Center in 1972,which trained citizens in the tools of video production for a brand new medium, Public-access television. An early advocate of democratic media, Stoney is often cited as being the Father of Public-access television. Today, Stoney sits on the Board of Directors for the Manhattan Neighborhood Network (MNN) and is active in the Alliance for Community Media (ACM). Each year, the ACM presents "The George Stoney Award" to an organization or individual who has made an outstanding contribution to championing the growth and experience of humanistic community communications.

__Wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_C._Stoney

 

http://www.channer.tv/tuesday.htm%2011-16-10.htm

http://allcommunitymedia.org

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The Data Journalism Handbook - Free Web version | edited by Jonathan Gray, Liliana Bournegru & Lucy Chambers

The Data Journalism Handbook - Free Web version | edited by  Jonathan Gray, Liliana Bournegru & Lucy Chambers | Civic Engagement | Scoop.it
What is data journalism? I could answer, simply, that it is journalism done with data. But that doesn’t help much.

 

Both ‘data’ and ‘journalism’ are troublesome terms. Some people think of ‘data’ as any collection of numbers, most likely gathered on a spreadsheet. 20 years ago, that was pretty much the only sort of data that journalists dealt with. But we live in a digital world now, a world in which almost anything can be — and almost everything is — described with numbers.

 

Your career history, 300,000 confidential documents, who knows who in your circle of friends can all be (and are) described with just two numbers: zeroes, and ones. Photos, video and audio are all described with the same two numbers: zeroes and ones. Murders, disease, political votes, corruption and lies: zeroes and ones.

 

What makes data journalism different to the rest of journalism? Perhaps it is the new possibilities that open up when you combine the traditional ‘nose for news’ and ability to tell a compelling story, with the sheer scale and range of digital information now available. [...]

 

— Paul Bradshaw, Birmingham City University

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Cleveland OH: Kent State Journalism Students Answer Call to Uncover Political Ad Data | by Bill Moyers

Cleveland OH: Kent State Journalism Students Answer Call to Uncover Political Ad Data | by Bill Moyers | Civic Engagement | Scoop.it
I was very pleased to find this video in my inbox this morning. Two intrepid journalism students from Kent State — Megan Closser and Shanice Dunning — took me up on my challenge to visit their local TV stations and uncover data behind the political ads they run. Naturally, they took their cameras but faced a surprising amount of resistance to using them.
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Meet The Media Companies Lobbying Against Transparency | Justin Elliott, OPB News

Meet The Media Companies Lobbying Against Transparency | Justin Elliott,  OPB News | Civic Engagement | Scoop.it

News organizations cultivate a reputation for demanding transparency, whether by suing for access to government documents, dispatching camera crews to the doorsteps of recalcitrant politicians, or editorializing in favor of open government.

 

But now many of the country’s biggest media companies — which own dozens of newspapers and TV news operations — are flexing their muscle in Washington in a fight against a government initiative to increase transparency of political spending.

 

The corporate owners or sister companies of some of the biggest names in journalism — NBC News, ABC News, Fox News, the Washington Post, the Wall Street Journal, USA Today, Politico, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution, and dozens of local TV news outlets — are lobbying are against a Federal Communications Commission measure to require broadcasters to post political ad data on the Internet.

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Los Angeles: City Council wants less buzz from its swarm of gadflies | Kate Linthicum, LA Times

Los Angeles: City Council wants less buzz from its swarm of gadflies | Kate Linthicum, LA Times | Civic Engagement | Scoop.it
After a string of disruptions during Los Angeles City Council meetings, several members are considering changes in the rules that govern when the public can speak, as well as how the proceedings are televised.
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TelVue Is Diamond Sponsor of Jersey Access Group Conference | SYS-CON MEDIA

TelVue Is Diamond Sponsor of Jersey Access Group Conference | SYS-CON MEDIA | Civic Engagement | Scoop.it

The Power of Partners Version 3.0, Eastern Region Community Media Conference is designed to bring together community media TV stations, independent producers, TV technicians/engineers, officers/advisors/board members, educators, manufacturers/vendors, and individual advocates supporting the production and distribution of media content to the community.

 

"The partnership and friendship between TelVue and JAG, both New Jersey-based organizations, goes back many years to when we first collaborated on a program-sharing solution for JAG member stations. At this Power of Partners show we look forward to continuing our efforts to help public media organizations simplify their operations, acquire more programming, and broaden their reach in the evolving multi-screen landscape," commented TelVue CEO Jesse Lerman.

The Jersey Access Group (JAG) has made great strides in promoting and organizing community broadcasting in New Jersey. In the spirit of partnership that defines this event, TelVue has worked with many JAG members, and is one of the founders of the Community Media Distribution Network (CMDN), an innovative program-sharing system accessible to hundreds of community broadcasters. Through CMDN, access stations can show their viewers programs from content contributors such as Democracy Now! and the National Science Foundation. TelVue has worked closely with both JAG and Alliance for Community Media leadership and visionaries in the development of the CMDN.

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Campaign Ads: How To Free The Files At Your TV Station | OPB News

Campaign Ads: How To Free The Files At Your TV Station | OPB News | Civic Engagement | Scoop.it
Television stations are required by the Federal Communications Commission to keep a list of political ad buys and to make it available on request. Stations don’t post this data on the Internet, however, so the only way to get the records is to go in person.

 

We think this data is vitally important, and can reveal how big money influences elections. So to make it accessible to everyone, we started a project last month named “Free the Files” to recruit citizens and local journalists to visit TV stations and post these “Public File” documents online.

 

So far, more than 180 people in 37 states and the District of Columbia have volunteered to make copies of the files, then scan and e-mail them to us. We’ve heard from news organizations that are sending reporters (see files gathered by the Cincinnati Enquirer and by the Wisconsin State Journal), universities that are sending students (Northwestern University students checked the Chicago market), and from people with some spare time who want to help.

 

But with hundreds of TV stations and untold millions in political ad spending expected this year, we still need you! The process takes between 15-30 minutes at your TV station, plus however long it takes to scan and e-mail us the files.

 

Before you set out, please let us know you’re interested by signing up on this form. We’ll make sure you aren’t grabbing files that someone else has already checked, and we’ll help coordinate so this takes as little of your time as possible.

 

How to Gather and Submit the Files >>>

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TV Broadcasters & Their Political Files | Meredith McGehee

Broadcasters refuse to put their political file online.

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Ronald Willett's 20 questions for parents about K-12 school reform - #11: Meetings on TV? | Valerie Strauss, The Washington Post

Ronald Willett's 20 questions for parents about K-12 school reform - #11: Meetings on TV? | Valerie Strauss, The Washington Post | Civic Engagement | Scoop.it
11. Are you willing to stand up and demand that your school board’s meetings strictly adhere to the open door laws, and that their meetings be put on your cable CATS (Community Access Television Service) channel in real time?

 

[ This was written by Ronald Willett, a former university professor, researcher and administrator, and former corporate executive, entrepreneur and CEO. For the last decade, as an avocation, he has tracked and researched U.S. K-12, and advocated its legitimate reform and pursuit of innovation. __ Valerie Strauss ]

 

By Ronald Willett

 

In an earlier post, I made a case for taking a broader perspective about the causes of U.S. school learning challenges, rather than simply focusing on its teachers.

 

The list of entities that play a major role in whether a district, or school, or even a classroom can meet the public’s learning goals include local school boards, state boards of education, the testing industry and more. (You can see them all here.) And finally, I said this:

 

“The observant reader may note that the above list is one short. Here it is, though it is not politically correct to say: ‘America’s K-12 parents.’ ”

 

If you are a parent, here are 20 questions for you to answer that will reveal how you would support a local school system that wanted to seriously reform.

 

Take the test. To how many of the following 20 propositions can you honestly say “yes?”

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