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China creates model for sustainable urban living

China creates model for sustainable urban living | Cities & Immigration | Scoop.it
At first glance, Tianjin Eco-City looks much like any other upscale Chinese urban development, with its rows of identical apartment blocks, wide roads and manicured verges.
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Earthship Green Homes

Earthship Green Homes | Cities & Immigration | Scoop.it
Earthship Biotecture designs green homes that incorporate systems for off-grid electricity production, water use and treatment, heating and cooling and even food production.
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Masdar: the shifting goalposts of Abu Dhabi's ambitious eco-city (Wired UK)

Masdar: the shifting goalposts of Abu Dhabi's ambitious eco-city (Wired UK) | Cities & Immigration | Scoop.it
Seventeen kilometres south east of Abu Dhabi, capital of the United Arab Emirates, Steve Severance should be sweating. His suit is dark. He wears a tie. The midday Sun hangs directly overhead. Yet Severance, 45, has not even begun to perspire
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Income inequality seen in satellite images from Google Earth

Income inequality seen in satellite images from Google Earth | Cities & Immigration | Scoop.it

Nice visual on differences in income, with associated paper.  No stats needed here; a simple exploratory/observational curiosity is all you need.  A great starter for classroom discussions/lab activities. Start with this primer where you can see the distinct difference.


Via Seth Dixon, RobersonWG
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Christian Madison's curator insight, January 13, 2014 7:28 PM

Well first of all I'd have to think on the bright side of life on the poor side. And on the other side, the rich side, I'd have to not take things for granted. On the poor side you'd have to use everything to it's limit and not waste a bit. While on the rich side it doesn't really matter that much.

Vivica Juarez's comment, January 13, 2014 8:16 PM
@Sherryn Kottoor made some excellent points about the pictures. In the diagram, it shows the poor vs. the rich. It clearly proves how there is a big difference between the two. The rich have more access to things, that the poor don't. The poor are also not as fortunate when it comes to living and education.
Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 2014 4:47 AM

useful for Year 8 and Year 11 Geography units.

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Cycling Culture in Copenhagen

Cycling Culture in Copenhagen | Cities & Immigration | Scoop.it
More than a third of Copenhageners bike to school or work, but it hasn't always been that way -- and city officials say that's not nearly enough.

Biking here was stress-free — quite a contrast to my route to work in Seattle, which one international bike expert recently called “death-defying.”


Via Seth Dixon, Donald Dane
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, August 21, 2013 11:34 AM

Forms of transportation are typically seen in terms of technological developments, but the cultural institutions can either support or hinder the diffusion.  In Copenhagen, bikes are as common as vacuum cleaners because of a cultural movement supported by political initiatives to incentivize cycling and promote sustainable transit and active lifestyles.  Read the first part of this series where an American tourist is pleasantly baffled by European cycling culture. 

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, September 1, 2013 5:44 PM

Very good! 

Sarah Ziolkowski's curator insight, January 1, 2014 6:25 PM

This article applies to the  concepts of culture unit, specifically the diffusion section. It talks about Copenhagen's new cycling culture emerging after the government's efforts to neutralize CO2. 36% of the city's population bikes to work or school, a number they'd like to increase. However, they are still well ahead of The United State's highest percent in Portland, Oregon of 6%. Copenhagen's action could be a model for your community to change to biking. 

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Urban, Urbanization -- National Geographic

Urban, Urbanization -- National Geographic | Cities & Immigration | Scoop.it
Learn about the latest addition to the Earth's habitats. Get free wallpaper, watch videos, and learn about issues involving urbanization.
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IfItWereMyHome.com

IfItWereMyHome.com | Cities & Immigration | Scoop.it

How to foster geographic empathy in the classroom discussion about development? Here's one way.  This link compares MANY countries' demographics in a very personal manner. 


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
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Don Brown Jr's comment, July 26, 2012 9:29 PM
Globalization discussions about raising disparity within countries often overshadow the growing inequalities between countries. What qualifies as middle class in the United States can be the equivalent of an upper-class lifestyle for many nations around the world. The same can be said in comparing what the poor in America have access to in comparison to many developing countries.
Mr. Verdugo's curator insight, March 21, 2013 10:08 PM

North - South. Here we have a glance of the differences

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, August 31, 2013 8:54 AM

A great resource to compare the liveability of countries using a range of criteria. 

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The Burgess and Hoyt Models

The Burgess and Hoyt Models | Cities & Immigration | Scoop.it

It is possible in many cities to identify zones with a particular type of land use - eg a residential zone. Often these zones have developed due to a combination of economic and social factors. In some cases planners may have tried to separate out some land uses, eg an airport is separated from a large housing estate.

 

The concentric and sector models in one news article?  The BBC is showing once again the possibilities available if only the United States taught more geography in the schools. 

 

Tags: urban, models, unit 7 cities, APHG.


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
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Elle Reagan's curator insight, May 26, 2015 10:35 PM

This article was great in that it left me with some great visuals and details on each of the models. For me, it's hard to remember each one of the models but this article really allowed me to compare each one and read about each one all in one place. The layout of the article was also nice and I think that it was just a great overall reminder of the models.

Emerald Pina's curator insight, May 26, 2015 11:56 PM

This article teaches you mainly about the Burgess and Hoyt Model. It compares the two, and it gives you detailed information on lots of the urbanization terms.

 

This article relates to Unit 7: Cities and Urban Land Use because it talks about how geographers drew up cities and made models of how cities were drawn up. It teaches you how they thought back then, and how urbanization has evolved from then to now.

Aidan Lowery's curator insight, March 21, 5:26 PM
unit 7
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Architect Proposes "Sea Trees": Floating Wildlife Oases

Architect Proposes "Sea Trees": Floating Wildlife Oases | Cities & Immigration | Scoop.it

To counter the effects on wildlife of overpopulation and climate change, Dutch architects Waterstudio.nl float a proposal for an urban Noah's Ark.
There are countless benefits to urbanization. Preserving flora and fauna isn’t one of them. The more people you’ve got in a city, the less room it has for things that aren’t people.


Via Peter Verschuere
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The New Sustainable Cities - Articles - Departures

The New Sustainable Cities - Articles - Departures | Cities & Immigration | Scoop.it
Are made-from-scratch metropolises the answer to Asia's urban overpopulation? Departures investigates. (#China builds the equivalent of #Rome every few weeks: Quid of new #urbanism sustainability?

Via Ana Valdés
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10% of the Population, 58% of the Crime: Jason Riley on Race, Politics and the Zimmerman Trial: The left wants to blame black criminality on racial animus and 'the system,' but blacks have long bee...

10% of the Population, 58% of the Crime: Jason Riley on Race, Politics and the Zimmerman Trial: The left wants to blame black criminality on racial animus and 'the system,' but blacks have long bee... | Cities & Immigration | Scoop.it
In The Wall Street Journal, Jason Riley writes that the left wants to blame black criminality on racial animus and 'the system,' but blacks have long been part of running that system.

Via #BBBundyBlog #NOMORELIES Tom Woods #Activist Award #Scoopiteer >20,000 Sources >250K Connections http://goo.gl/ruHO3Q
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The house of the future is here: TVs connect to fridges and lights

The house of the future is here: TVs connect to fridges and lights | Cities & Immigration | Scoop.it

In the home of the future, the front door will ‘talk’ to your smoke alarm, lights will flash when the fridge door is left open and a teddy will put your child to bed.

That’s the vision presented by Qualcomm at this year’s Mobile World Congress in its Connected Home, which shows how almost anything in your house can either be controlled by a mobile, or be linked together electronically.

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10 Reasons Why EarthShips Are F!#%ing Awesome

10 Reasons Why EarthShips Are F!#%ing Awesome | Cities & Immigration | Scoop.it
Earthships are 100% sustainable homes that are both cheap to build and awesome to live in. They offer amenities like no other sustainable building style you have come across. For the reasons that follow, I believe Earthships can actually change the world. See for yourself!
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ShowCase: LILYPAD, A Floating Ecopolis for Ecological Refugees | Features | Archinect

ShowCase: LILYPAD, A Floating Ecopolis for Ecological Refugees | Features | Archinect | Cities & Immigration | Scoop.it
ShowCase is a new feature on Archinect, presenting exciting new work from designers representing all creative fields and all geographies. We are accepting nominations for upcoming ShowCase features - if you would like to suggest a project, please send us a message.
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A Brazilian Boom Town of ‘Eternal Beauty’ Faces Its Troubled Side

A Brazilian Boom Town of ‘Eternal Beauty’ Faces Its Troubled Side | Cities & Immigration | Scoop.it
Salvador has experienced a surge in violent crime, chaotic traffic, and the metamorphosis of once-elegant seaside districts into crime-ridden areas.
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NatGeo Feature: Megacities

NatGeo Feature: Megacities | Cities & Immigration | Scoop.it

"By 2030, two out of three people will live in an urban world, with most of the explosive growth occurring in developing countries. For a preview of the future, the last in the Challenges for Humanity series explores São Paulo, Brazil; Lagos, Nigeria; Bangkok, Thailand; and Hyderabad, India."


Via Seth Dixon, Allison Anthony
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Elle Reagan's curator insight, May 26, 2015 9:38 PM

I thought this article was good as it gave information on how the world as we know it is growing and cities are popping up everywhere. Developing countries are seeing a large increase in growth and with that comes the growth of cities. With this, more megacities will be born and hopefully the quality of life increases with life in cities.

L.Long's curator insight, August 28, 2015 6:08 AM

mega cities

L.Long's curator insight, August 28, 2015 6:09 AM

mega cities

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Urbanization, Overpopulation - National Geographic

Urbanization, Overpopulation - National Geographic | Cities & Immigration | Scoop.it
Learn about issues involving urbanization with National Geographic.
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Urban Trees Reveal Income Inequality

Urban Trees Reveal Income Inequality | Cities & Immigration | Scoop.it
Wealthy cities seem to have it all. Expansive, well-manicured parks. Fine dining. Renowned orchestras and theaters. More trees. Wait, trees?

 

I certainly wouldn't argue that trees create economic inequality, but there appears to be a strong correlation in between high income neighborhoods and large mature trees in cities throughout the world (for a scholarly reference from the Journal, Landscape and Urban Planning, see: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0169204607002174 ). Why is there such a connection? In terms of landscape analysis, what does this say about those who have created these environments? Why do societies value trees in cities? How does the presence of trees change the sense of place of a particular neighborhood? For more Google images that show the correlation between income and trees (and to share your own), see: http://persquaremile.com/2012/05/24/income-inequality-seen-from-space/


Via Seth Dixon, Matthew Wahl
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Donald Dane's comment, December 10, 2013 10:00 AM
this short article explains the evidence supporting tree to rich cities ratio. it goes to show that if I'm going to pay big bucks for location I would want the scenery to be beautiful hands down. they mention the per capita increase to tree ratio and how its only a dollar that influences such a high quantity of trees in city. bottom line is that it makes sense for the more trees in wealthier neighborhoods of the city because when your in the heart of the city you tend to see quantity of quality of homes and being jammed packed into small square footage doesn't leave much room for nature. but go just outside the city where the real estate is high and more spacious and you will find more trees the further and further from the center.
megan b clement's comment, December 16, 2013 1:04 AM
Like a previous article it explains how if viewing a neighborhood with lush grass and huge yards with landscaped grounds it is associated with big money. People pay top dollar for houses that have huge back yards and privacy of trees. You would not see yards like this is the city though so these neighborhoods on the outskirts of the citylines.
Shaun Scallan's curator insight, January 27, 2014 11:48 PM

Interesting the value, in the broadest sense, that trees can bring in an urban setting

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Africa's 'new cities': Urban future or utopian fantasies?

Africa's 'new cities': Urban future or utopian fantasies? | Cities & Immigration | Scoop.it
Gleaming high-tech cities are being planned across Africa. Some say they are unrealistic, others say they are the future.

Via Matthew Wahl
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Population Growth Is An Advantage

Population Growth Is An Advantage | Cities & Immigration | Scoop.it
World Population Day is an annual event, observed on July 11th every year, which seeks to raise awareness of global population issues. The event was established by the Governing Council of the Unit...
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Streetmix: A new app lets you reimagine and redesign your city's streets

Streetmix: A new app lets you reimagine and redesign your city's streets | Cities & Immigration | Scoop.it

It's easy to point out that there's something wrong with a system, such as the design of an urban street or neighborhood, but it's another thing entirely to come up with a design that would be better.

But when it comes to re-imagining the streets in your neighborhood, that process just got quite a bit easier, thanks to a new web app. With Streetmix, users design their perfect street, with the right balance of bike lanes, sidewalks, public transport and vehicle traffic lanes, just by dragging and dropping design segments and adjusting their parameters.

Some users are designing alternatives to real streets in their cities; the app uses real-world design constraints, which can help the layperson understand some of what urban planners need to incorporate in their designs and enable better communication between the planners and the population in design and use issues.

 


Via Lauren Moss
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miguel sa's curator insight, September 4, 2013 4:15 PM

Now this sounds like fun!