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Stage 2, ENS2.5- Using mapping terminology to locate cities, rivers and mountains in NSW
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BrainPOP | Mount Everest

BrainPOP | Mount Everest | cities river mountains in new | Scoop.it
In this educational animated movie about Social Studies learn about mountains, Nepal, Tibet, Himalayas, glaciers, ranges, summits, and climbing.
Maddie Perkins's insight:

It is important to include a global perspective when teaching HSIE in the classroom, so students are aware of the wider world around them. Bliss (2008) contends that ‘today, young students face a society that is increasingly global in focus and are profoundly affected by decisions and events occurring beyond their own shores’. Consequently, when teaching students about mountain ranges in NSW as per the outcome ENS2.5, this informative BrainPop video about the Himalayan mountain ranges and Mount Everest is perfect for a Stage 2 classroom.

 

This video covers issues such as the history of Everest, how mountains and glaciers are formed, the history of the Sherpa community, latitude and longitude, and how the melting ice supplies northern India with water. Therefore, this is a rich and informative video which forms a multitude of teaching ideas and links to other KLAs.

 

This video contains links to a myriad of literacy and teaching activities based on the clip. One excellent example is a Science and Technology experiment, demonstrating a change in air pressure similar to that on the summit of Everest.This video also discusses how Mt Everest supplies northern India with its water supply; a great empathetic writing task if students hypothesise what might happen if the water supply ran out. 

 

Assessment tasks for this global perspective on mountains could be as simple as writing an information report, or comparing Mt Kosciuszko (in NSW) to Mt Everest. 

In conclusion, this video is a great way to embed a global perspective in the teaching of ENS2.5.  

 

 

References

Bliss, S. (2008). ‘Global Education in NSW Curriculum Overview’. Retrieved from:http://www.ptc.nsw.edu.au/SiteMedia/w3svc361/Uploads/Documents/4.%20GE%20IN%20NSW%20CURRICULUMS-fOCUS%20HSIE.pdf

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Water Rights in the Murray-Darling Basin | Human Rights in Australia | Right Now

Water Rights in the Murray-Darling Basin | Human Rights in Australia | Right Now | cities river mountains in new | Scoop.it
Maddie Perkins's insight:

Many students in Stage 2 would be aware of the struggles previously faced by Indigenous Australians in regard to land rights. Therefore, this article is fantastic as it challenges students’ understandings by examining the importance of water rights to Aboriginal communities along the Murray-Darling Basin.

 

Naturally, the teacher would show respect and sensitivity to the Australian Indigenous culture when discussing issues related to this article, and would encorage students to demonstrate the same level of respect. If there were Aborignal students in the class, extra care would be taken.   

 

Aboriginal perspectives feature frequently in the HSIE K-6 Syllabus, enhancing the usability of this resource. The structure, grammar and vocabulary in the article are mostly appropriate for a Stage 2 class. However, words such as ‘entrenched’ and ‘biodiversity’ might be too advanced for some students and this could form the basis of literacy lessons on dictionary work or reading the context of a sentence to hypothesise the meaning of a certain word.Other teaching activities could include a cloze activity or a mind map summarising the article.

 

To assess students understanding of this issue, they could hold a hypothetical class debate between the mentioned Murray Lower Darling Indigenous Nations (MLDRIN) group who campaign for Indigenous water rights, and a hypothetical company who wants to build a factory upon the river banks. The teacher could also organise a speaker from MLDRIN to present to the class about the work that the organisation does. Similarly, this article could be linked with the KLA of English whereby students write a letter to their local Member for Parliament, campaigning for Indigenous water rights. This creates potential literacy lessons on persuasive writing and formal letter writing. Incorporating the perspectives of Indigenous people, Indigenous issues and Indigenous symbols into schools on an organisational level adheres to Stevens' (2005) holistic model of embedding Indigenous perspectives in schools.  

 

When assessing this article using the ‘Selection criteria for the evaluation of Aboriginal texts’ it appears to be authentic, accurate, appropriate (we don't know if it was written by an Indigenous Australian but it isn't racially biased ), and does not appear to include content of a secret or sacred nature. Furthermore, this article is even more useful as it adresses the indicator of learning about rivers in NSW, adds an Aboriginal perspective to the topic, and challenges students understandings of rights.

 

In conclusion, this is a resource which will be extremely versatile in the Stage 2 classroom. 

 

Refrences

 

Stevens, V. (2005). Embedding Indigenous Perspectives Model Framework. Unpublished Model Framework, Indigenous Intellectual Property (PowerPoint). 

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The Atlas of NSW - Topic - Environment

The Atlas of NSW - Topic - Environment | cities river mountains in new | Scoop.it
The Atlas of New South Wales, list of related articles on Environment for NSW Australia
Maddie Perkins's insight:

This website is a great starting point for student-directed research about NSW in general. Divided into six sections with information about census data, economy, elections, environment, history and people, the language is simple and should be understood by most Stage 2 students.

 

The environment section is segregated into areas such as fauna, geology, National Parks, rivers and vegetation. The content covered on this website could be utilised in research projects in other KLA's, increasing its usability in the classroom. For example, the geology information could be used within the Stage 2 Science and Technology curriculum learning about soil.

 

In terms of the nature of ENS2.5, this website is a treasure trove of information. The surface water section contains useful content and statistics about usage in NSW and where towns get their water from. Students develop 'higher order thinking' when they think about information on a deeper level; here students could think empathetically about what might happen to a town if their water source ceased. It also contains information about the population of ciites in NSW which can be compared to cities in other states in Australia.

 

In terms of assessments, in groups students could create their own atlas of NSW using these categories of NSW as inspiration. This easily could be a summative assessment at the end of the topic. Numeracy links could be formed in studying percentages of water usage. Literacy links could be in answering comprehension questions based on the content, or doing dictionary work on unfamiliar words.

 

I will be using this resource in my classroom! 

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BBC - See You See Me - Landscapes

Maddie Perkins's insight:

It is counter-productive to teach students about cities, rivers and mountains in NSW without them being able to locate them on a map! This fun and interactive website is perfect for teaching Stage 2 mapping skills and terminology, such as compass reading, grid references, symbols, keys and scale. This is obviously dependent on accessability to internet within the school. Gilbert and Hoepper (2011, p.264) describe a notion known as 'geospatial concepts', which form the framework of thinking in geography, providing an integral part of geographical thinking. According to geospatial concepts, the skills taught on this BBC website are classified under the 'elemental' skills, best taught to S1 and S2. 

 

Being able to perform these skills will assist students in achieving the outcome ENS2.5, by locating and mapping cities, rivers and mountains in NSW using locational terminology and mapping skills, as per syllabus requirements. This hands-on website could be used by the teacher in a whole class activity or by individual students during ICT lessons, thereby improving their ICT skills. It can be accessed at home on ipads, iphones or on the internet.

 

Teaching activities could include students working in groups to construct freehand maps of NSW geographic features such as mountain ranges and rivers, or discussing the need for a key to distinguish between cities, capital cities, states and rivers. More capable students could work together to make a map of Australian cities, capital cities, mountains and rivers. Students who are struggling could create a map of their local area with known locations such as their school, their house, and a local park.These could easily become summative assessments of students' understanding.

 

Subsequent literacy lessons could be based on creating tourist brochures of regional/rural cities in NSW. Numeracy lessons could focus on how to display scale, and figuring out distances between cities and rivers. This could easily form the basis of a summative assessment.

 

I can’t wait to use this resource in my classroom! 

 

References

Gilbert, R & Hoepper, B. (2011). Teaching Society and Environment- 4th Edition. Victoria, Cengage Learning 

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MapSkip - About Us

MapSkip - About Us | cities river mountains in new | Scoop.it
Maddie Perkins's insight:

 

MapSkip is a new but interesting concept which partners with Google Maps, allowing users to write stories and upload photos from their local area, effectively 'pinning' them to the map. This makes the content viewable by users across the world. Sounds can even be recorded and uploaded! Naturally, there is a teacher moderator function that ensures that student’s content is reviewed before it is uploaded. 

 

Assessments coincide with otucomes for ICT usage; students could work individually using mapping skills and terminology already learnt in this topic to locate a familiar area such as their suburb or another city in NSW that they have been to. Naturally, they would include information about the city, and any nearby mountains and rivers to co-incide with other content from this outocme. Students could research census data of the city to include this numerical data, a possible numeracy strategy.  

 

Entries exist all over the world and students can use this website to learn about global cities. 

 

This assesment could then then form the basis of a summative assesment at the end of the term to ascertain to what extent the student has achieved ENS2.5. 

 

Newman and Wehlage (1993) argue that the pedagogy of 'Active and Experiential Learning' accesses a 'higher order of thinking' and a 'connectedness to the world.' Analysing the area they live in activates higher order thinking and writing entries on MapSkip gives students the means to compare their lives to people in other countries, thus 'connecting to the world'. Through teacher connections in other countries, pen pal arrangements could be created, thus enhancing the higher order thinking and connectedness to the world of students. Hopefully through this pedagogy, students will develop a concept of the world around them, the global community and their connectedness to it. 

 

References:

 

Newmann, F., Wehlage, G. 1993. Five Standards of Authentic Learning. Educational Leadership, April, 8-12

 
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