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Connected Learning: The Power Of Social Learning Models

Connected Learning: The Power Of Social Learning Models | Cities by Citizens | Scoop.it

DML’s model is similar in philosophy, underscoring the role of interdependence. Called Connected Learning, the model is a response to changing face of culture as it relates to social and digital media. As technology evolves at breakneck speed, models that account for this kind of change are few and far between. Without review and revision of how and where students learn, the response is less than ideal: either blind adoption of technology, awkward adoption, or no adoption at all.


Via jean lievens
David Week's insight:

In a knowledge economy, the city function is learning.

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Charles van der Haegen's curator insight, August 5, 2014 3:30 AM

Wandering on Jean Lievens's Peer2Politics scoop-it

 

Looking for a open source web-learning tool similar to what I experienced following the Howard Rheingold social media classrooms...

http://www.rheingold.com/university/about-the-social-media-classroom

 

AleksBlumentals's curator insight, August 5, 2014 9:13 AM

Cities are like water, while they perform, we don't notice how their lack is affecting us. Yet if too many are free riders, and instead of leaders all is delegated to administrators, this "commons" is depleted. Then, it no longer is a viable container or scaffold for growth.


The way this happens is quite rapid as those individuals with a fungible capacity emigrate, and the structure left looks more and more like a Swiss Cheese full of holes. As these specialized capacities find jobs elsewhere, the town of older people looses much of its adaptive capability.

On the other hand, if the town can let go of grand schemes, it may in this slowing down, uncover new answers of global relevance. But it will not do so while it has bosses and classes living as if nothing is going on. 

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Common good : why the public voice matters in urban mobility planning: Lessons from Brazil

Common good : why the public voice matters in urban mobility planning: Lessons from Brazil | Cities by Citizens | Scoop.it

Eighty-five percent of Brazilians live, work, and play in cities. As such, urban mobility is a fundamental driver of quality of life for the vast majority of the country, enabling access to jobs, healthcare, schools, and other everyday needs. In 2012, Brazil’s national government recognized this importance by enacting the National Policy on Urban Mobility, which requires cities with 20,000 residents or more to develop urban mobility plans in order to receive federal funding. At the same time, the federal Growth Acceleration Program (Programa de Açeleração de Crescimento [PAC]) has made US$ 57 billion available for 88 mid-size cities to develop and implement sustainable urban mobility plans.



Via Flora Moon, Jocelyn Stoller, COMMON GOOD FORUM
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Digital Gloss's curator insight, December 27, 2014 6:35 PM

This article states that: "As representatives from São Paulo, Belo Horizonte, Florianópolis, and more cities highlighted, city leaders are increasingly aware that mobility solutions must involve sustained public input to ensure fairness, public awareness, and decisions that have public backing and are informed by the diverse needs of the public.


"Under Brazil’s mobility law, cities are even required to ensure public participation in the development and implementation of their mobility plans. The importance of broad-based citizen participation was brought into the spotlight in 2013 when protests – partially triggered by rising public transport costs – spread from Porto Alegre to nearly a dozen cities. While protesters voiced numerous complaints, common themes included corruption, lack of transparency around public investments, and municipal decision-making that was not responsive to local needs."


Public input is extremely important here in the United States, too, and that's why groups like the Bus Riders Union are needed to help ensure fairness and to make sure diverse interests are taken into consideration when transit decisions are made.

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The Urban Future of the American Suburb

The Urban Future of the American Suburb | Cities by Citizens | Scoop.it
Michael Caplin's quest to transform the quintessential edge city
David Week's insight:

The conversion of suburbs to urbs, often described as densification: can this be achieved by more citizen-empowered forms of urban planning? Conventional wisdom is that NIMBYism would prevent that from happening, and outside top-down governance is needed to pave the way. But NIMBYism is itself a reaction to powerlessness.

If citizens given the power to densify their suburb, and to decide how it is done, and who reaps the social and financial rewards, would they still be NIMBYs? Or would they lead the charge?

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ReSurfaced: A Look at Tactical Urbanism Done Right

ReSurfaced: A Look at Tactical Urbanism Done Right | Cities by Citizens | Scoop.it
Learn how changing one vacant lot transformed a community.

Via Manu Fernandez
David Week's insight:

Nice.

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Archope's curator insight, October 14, 2014 12:08 PM

La ocupación de baldios urbanos, creando espacios significativos

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Is tactical urbanism right for your community?

Is tactical urbanism right for your community? | Cities by Citizens | Scoop.it

old questionIt sounds more like a military exercise than something urban planners and urban planning aficionados can learn about. In reality, tactical urbanism is a grassroots movement for citizens to make cha...


Via Manu Fernandez
David Week's insight:

A good question. But as important is the idea behind it: tactical urbanism has it's limits. Building heights, public transport, rail lines, the distribution of workplaces and retail… these are not tactical issues. They're strategic. So: how does tactical urbanism interact with strategic urbanism? What are the limits of one and the beginnings of the other? The strengths and weaknesses of each?

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Push for Immigrants to Become Citizens

Push for Immigrants to Become Citizens | Cities by Citizens | Scoop.it
The mayors of the nation's three largest cities—New York, Los Angeles and Chicago—plan to launch a new effort, 'Cities for Citizenship,' to increase citizenship among legal permanent residents.
David Week's insight:

Here's one reason that mayors might make for better government than "higher" levels… they're closer to their own people, and therefore less like to advocate inhuman policies. Here, the mayors of NY, LA and Chicago all advocate for immigrants.

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In Pictures: A place called home

In Pictures: A place called home | Cities by Citizens | Scoop.it
Snapshots of lives on the periphery; stories of persistence, determination and a hope for something more.
David Week's insight:

I never saw slums as places to be pitied. Growing up in Jakarta gave me to close a perspective for that. Instead, I see slums as places from which we might learn things we will be happy to know.

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Four types of placemaking

Four types of placemaking | Cities by Citizens | Scoop.it
Placemaking is the process of creating quality places that people want to live, work, play, and learn in.

Via Manu Fernandez
David Week's insight:

Nice typology of urban placemaking. And a nice definition of placemaking.

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Suzette Jackson's curator insight, October 13, 2014 6:45 PM

So what is Tactical Urbanism? It is the short term, often one day testing of urban solutions through activation! GeelongBetterBlock is a great example of this, inspired by urban activations in the USA by Jason Roberts andAndrew Howard.

Christophe CESETTI's curator insight, December 27, 2014 5:55 AM

Collection sur les Biens Communs
 http://www.pearltrees.com/t/biens-communs/id2338048

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Jaime Lerner's Urban Acupuncture

Jaime Lerner's Urban Acupuncture | Cities by Citizens | Scoop.it
Urban Acupuncture: Celebrating Pinpricks of Change that Enrich City Life.

Via Manu Fernandez
David Week's insight:

Jaime Lerner's book… a must read, no matter WHAT it's about! (PS: I think acupuncture is a terrible metaphor. I want to see Urban GP!)

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'Open Source' Place-making

'Open Source' Place-making | Cities by Citizens | Scoop.it

sEssay arguing for a new approach to the development of real estate, informed by the rise of non-profit enterprise, the internet economy and sustainable development. Commissioned by UK agencies Architecture + Design Scotland and the Scottish Centre for Regeneration, as part of the Sustainable Communities Initiative of the Scottish Government.


Via Manu Fernandez
David Week's insight:

Nice essay which echoes many of the themes we discuss in Cities By Citizens: the various forms of piecemeal, experimental design; the cultural influence of the Internet as a new model of social organisation; the increased demand of citizens to be heard and to take part.

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The sharing economy comes into the commercial kitchen

The sharing economy comes into the commercial kitchen | Cities by Citizens | Scoop.it
Commercial kitchens are really expensive to build. Why not share?

Via june holley
David Week's insight:

The shared commercial kitchen is important NOT just as another example of the "sharing economy" (some of which is not about sharing at all: e.g. uber). It's important because helps street food traders get a leg up on the economic ladder, while complying with health laws.

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Can small ideas add up to big change for cities? 13 projects that prove they can (VIDEO)

Can small ideas add up to big change for cities? 13 projects that prove they can (VIDEO) | Cities by Citizens | Scoop.it

Via june holley
David Week's insight:
This reminds me of the ecological concept of panarchy. Those of raised on the idea that Nature is hierarchy also tend to think that small things have a small impact, and big things have big impacts.But in both the human world, and the natural world, this is not the case. Often, small events can trigger huge changes. A structure in which this can happen is called a panarchy, in opposition to the idea of hierarchy: http://www.resalliance.org/index.php/panarchyBut think about how the actions of a few on 9/11 knocked the world off its political axis. Or a thrown cigarette can burn down a forest. These are negative examples.These films contain positive examples.
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june holley's curator insight, September 22, 2014 12:52 PM

13 videos about fantastic small community projects with BIG Impact!

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Maps: are they instruments of power

David Week's insight:

A rather dense paper, but relates directly to why it is so liberating to get people to map their own cities: because maps are instruments of power.

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Big Government, Happy Citizens?

Big Government, Happy Citizens? | Cities by Citizens | Scoop.it
You may like to talk about how much happier you'd be if the government didn't interfere with your life, but that's not what the research shows.
David Week's insight:

Talk of more layers of urban governance might at first turn people off. But the evidence suggests that people are happier with more governance. And why not? We are social beings.

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The End of Banking - a financial reform proposal (book) | P2P Foundation

The End of Banking - a financial reform proposal (book) | P2P Foundation | Cities by Citizens | Scoop.it

The"The End of Banking" proposes to end money creation by banks, requiring 100% asset backing for liabilities on financial institution balance sheets.


The book addresses banking, not just banks, because banking, which the authors define as the creation of private or “inside” money, is not an activity limited to banks. Other, non-bank financial institutions are also involved in the money creation business. 


“Calling for the end of banking might sound too simplistic to solve today’s problems in the financial system. Such a notion likely stems from a vague definition of banking.


Some label all activities undertaken by banks as banking. Others think of banking as a bundle of financial services such as asset management or securities underwriting.


We adopt a macroeconomic perspective and define banking as the creation of money out of credit.”


Via Sepp Hasslberger
David Week's insight:

If I look at the impact on communities in the United States of out-of-control digitalised lending, what I see is this:

- loans were extended to people that could not repay
- the mortgages were then bundled into traceable instruments, and onsold
- this bundling and unselling created a situation in which for many houses, no-one knows any more who owns them after the borrowers default
- they sit vacant, decaying, and degrading the neighbourhood around them psychologically and economically
- the bundling and onselling also provided an incentive to the original lender to act carelessly, because they did not carry the can if the mortgage went sour
- the bundling and repetitive unselling, with poor paperwork, was facilitated by the fast flow of trade and capital flows in a digital world.

In Australia, my bank cannot sell my mortgage. I don't know whether that's through prudence or law, but I would not take a mortgage if I thought it could end up bundled with others in a globalised capital market.

I'm pre-ordering the book. 

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Sepp Hasslberger's curator insight, November 25, 2014 5:25 PM

The End of Banking is a very readable book for anyone interested in matters of finance. The authors propose a surprisingly simple step to end the creation of money by private interests, including banks.

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15 Participatory Budgeting Projects that Give Power to the People

15 Participatory Budgeting Projects that Give Power to the People | Cities by Citizens | Scoop.it
15 Participatory Budgeting Projects

Via Manu Fernandez
David Week's insight:

Participatory budgeting is really taking off. It's a first step and important towards more participatory governance. What other steps could be taken using the same technological platforms?

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Putting people first New ebook details Seoul’s Sharing City project

Putting people first New ebook details Seoul’s Sharing City project | Cities by Citizens | Scoop.it
With its official, city-wide commitment to the sharing economy, Seoul’s metropolitan government has emerged as a leader in the global sharing movement. Recently, Creative Commons Korea released an ebook detailing many of the Sharing City, Seoul projects, at both the community- and municipal-level, that form this new sharing mega-city.

As the Sharing City, Seoul ebook introduction notes, while Seoul is spearheading a sharing revolution, sharing is not new to its residents. Seoul is a city with a rich cultural heritage of sharing, including labor exchanges called “poomasi” and farmers’ coops called “dure.” Today, with 10 million residents—the majority of them possessing smartphones—and a government committed to creating a sharing culture, Seoul is well-positioned to bring mass sharing to one of the densest cities in the world.

Via Manu Fernandez
David Week's insight:

A free ebook on how the Koreans are taking the lead on sharing.

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What Keeps U.S. Mayors Awake at Night? – Next City

What Keeps U.S. Mayors Awake at Night? – Next City | Cities by Citizens | Scoop.it
The answers you get when you survey more than 70 U.S. city mayors.
David Week's insight:

If you want to convince cities or allowing citizens to participate more in the city-shaping and local area governance, it helps if you know what concerns the city has. Pitch your ideas to address those concerns, and you may have an easier time convincing them.

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Lifestyle of the lifecycle « POPULUS community planning inc.

Lifestyle of the lifecycle « POPULUS community planning inc. | Cities by Citizens | Scoop.it
David Week's insight:

This is a set of questions that every working professional should ask themselves daily. They can be summed up in one question: Whom do you serve?

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The balance of powers – Cities by Citizens

David Week's insight:

Today's blog post... urban governance requires a balance of powers. If we're going to change the balance, we need to talk about exactly how.

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Be Wilder: Designing Urban Futures from the Bottom-Up (Part 4 of 4)

Be Wilder: Designing Urban Futures from the Bottom-Up (Part 4 of 4) | Cities by Citizens | Scoop.it
Throughout the last month, we’ve been exploring the topic of urban ecology
from a few different perspectives.

Via Manu Fernandez
David Week's insight:

So often we think of "placemaking" in terms of streets, squares and parks. But many community concerns are not about the formal spaces, but the informal, the streams, the back lanes and unused edges… Let's remember them as well.

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‘Knight Cities’: How the pop-up movement is changing communities

‘Knight Cities’: How the pop-up movement is changing communities | Cities by Citizens | Scoop.it
It seems that every city has its own version of pop-up parks, parklets, better blocks and other temporary design interventions ...

Via Manu Fernandez
David Week's insight:

The movement for direct democratic interventions is now officially mainstream. Things will move fast now. 

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Innovation Excellence | Prototypes Are The Best Way To Innovate

Innovation Excellence | Prototypes Are The Best Way To Innovate | Cities by Citizens | Scoop.it
If you’re serious about innovation, you must learn, as second nature, to convert your ideas into prototypes. Funny thing about ideas is they’re never fully formed – they morph and twist as you talk about them, and as long as you keep talking they keep changing.

Via june holley
David Week's insight:

The importance of prototyping to Cities By Citizens is that it allows people to agree to a change by seeing and experiencing it, rather than through drawings, speeches or endless blocks of text. But prototyping is more than that: it's also a new way of thinking which is radically empirically. It says that it doesn't matter what you THINK will happen, reality has a way of surprising us. So rather than over-think, over-rationalise, over-predict, and over-plan—let's try stuff as early as possible, and see what happens.

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june holley's curator insight, October 4, 2014 7:22 AM

Non-profits and networks need to start prototyping too!

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Cooperatives and Collectives - Think Outside the Boss

I am a member of Agaric, a growing cooperative of Drupal Developers. As a worker cooperative, Agaric's members are all workers and owners, or worker-owners, an…

Via june holley
David Week's insight:

Not only in the public sphere, but in the private sector as well, we're seeing re-emergence of interest in new forms of governance and organisation. This emergence, we think, is due to the emergence of new industrial forms of production, including peer-to-peer production and the maker revolution.

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Kostakis & Bauwens: Network Society and Future Scenarios for a Collaborative Economy | David Bollier

Kostakis & Bauwens: Network Society and Future Scenarios for a Collaborative Economy | David Bollier | Cities by Citizens | Scoop.it
Michel Bauwens and Vasilis Kostakis have just published a new book that offers a rich, sophisticated critique of our current brand of capitalism, and looks to current trends in digital collaboration to propose the outlines of the next, network-based economy and society.

Via jean lievens
David Week's insight:

I was pleased to spend several days in Valparaiso with Michel Bauwens, one of the authors of this book. Michel is a good, nice and very smart guy. But more important: through these conversations I was introduce to a set of concepts which represent the tip of some very big and widespread social and technical changes now afoot. 

I've bought this book. You should buy it too. It's expensive. But it's short! And it's one of those rare books that are transformational. By the time you have reached the last page, you will never see the world in quite the same way again.

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Cities and Citizenship: The Right to the City: a Virtual Reader

David Week's insight:

A bibliography.

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