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CIS 170C Lab 6 of 7: Menu-Driven Application | DeVry Online Help

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Lab # CIS CIS170C-A6 Lab 6 of 7: Menu-Driven Application Lab Overview – Scenario/Summary

You will utilize classes in the design of this program.
You will code, build, and execute an Automated Teller Machine (ATM) Menu-Driven Console Application.

Learning outcomes:

To be able to explain the need for menus in a program To be able to determine ways to implement menus in a Windows console application To be able to understand the classes and objects used in a Windows console application To be able to write a Windows console application

 

 

Deliverables

Section

Deliverable

Points

Lab 6

Step 5: Program Listing and Output

45

 

Lab Steps

 

Preparation:

If you are using the Citrix remote lab, follow the login instructions located on the iLab tab in Course Home.

Locate the Visual Studio 2010 icon and launch the application.

Lab:

Part A: Password Program

Step 1: Requirements

Write a windows console application that simulates an Automated Teller Machine (ATM) menu similar to the following (this program assumes you are uniquely logged in).

Welcome to the DeVry Bank Automated Teller Machine

Check balance Make withdrawal Make deposit View account information View statement View bank information Exit

The result of choosing #1 will be the following:
Current balance is: $2439.45

The result of choosing #2 will be the following:
How much would you like to withdraw? $200.50

The result of choosing #3 will be the following:
How much would you like to deposit? $177.32

The result of choosing #4 will be the following:

Name: (Student’s first and last name goes here)

Account Number: 1234554321

The result of choosing #5 will be the following:
01/01/11 – McDonald’s – $6.27

01/15/11 – Kwik Trip – $34.93

02/28/11 – Target – $124.21

The result of choosing #6 will be the following:
Devry Bank, established 2011

(123) 456-7890

12345 1st St.

Someplace, NJ 12345

The result of choosing #7 will be the following:
*Exit the program – terminate console application.

Step 2: Processing Logic
You will create a Menu Builder class (for menu applications), a Test Menu class (for Main), and a MenuBuilder.h for a total of three files as a demonstration of understanding, creating, and using classes.

Using the pseudocode below, write the code that will meet the requirements.

Create a Test Menu class

For main method and to call the Menu Driven class

Create a MenuBuilder Class

This will be where you create statements for the following:

1. Check balance

2. Make withdrawal

3. Make deposit

4. View account information

5. View statement

6. View bank information

7. Exit

Create a MenuBuilder.h

Include a header file in your program. 2.  This will be where you utilize standardized Identifiers,
preprocessor directives, classes, namespaces, and so forth.

 

Step 3: Create a New Project

Create a new project and name it LAB6. Write your code using the Processing Logic in Step 2.  Make sure you save your program.

 

Step 4: Compile and Execute

a)  Compile your program and eliminate all syntax errors.

b)  Build your program and verify the results of the program. Make corrections to the program logic if necessary until the results of the program execution are what you expect.

 

Step 5: Print Screenshots and Program

Capture a screen print of your output. (Do a PRINT SCREEN and paste into an MS Word document.) Copy your code and paste it into the same MS Word document that contains the screen print of your output. Save the Word document as Lab06B_LastName_FirstInitial.

 

END OF ILAB

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CIS 170C iLab 5 of 7: Arrays and Strings | DeVry Online Help

CIS 170C iLab 5 of 7: Arrays and Strings | DeVry Online Help | CIS 170 Full Course | Scoop.it

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Lab # CIS CIS170C-A5 Lab 5 of 7: Arrays and Strings Lab Overview – Scenario/Summary

You will code, build, and execute two programs requiring arrays and strings.

First program (Video Game Player Program): Determine the average score for a group of players and then determine who scored below average.

Second program (Pig Latin): Convert words in a phrase to pig latin.

Learning outcomes:

Be able to explain the need for arrays in a program. Be able to determine the appropriate array data type to use in a given program. Be able to write a program that implements arrays. Be able to explain the way memory is allocated for arrays in a program. Be able to explain the fact that arrays are objects in C++. Be able to write a program that implements strings.

 

 

Deliverables

Section

Deliverable

Points

Part A

Step 5: Program Listing and Output

20

Part B

Step 5: Program Listing and Output

25

Lab Steps

Preparation:

If you are using the Citrix remote lab, follow the login instructions located on the iLab tab in Course Home.

Locate the Visual Studio 2010 icon and launch the application.

Lab:

Part A: Video Game Player Program

Step 1: Requirements

Write a program to do the following:

In main, declare a PlayerName Array and a Score Array. Declare the size of the arrays to be 100.

In the InputData function, input the player name and score into the arrays for an unknown number of players up to 100.

In the DisplayPlayerData function, display the name and score of each player.  Numberofplayers

In the CalculateAverageScore function, calculate the average score and return it by value.  numberofplayers

In the DisplayBelowAverage function, display the name and score for any player who scored below the average. Do not use global variables.

Number of players

Output from Program:

Enter Player Name (Q to quit): Bob

Enter score for Bob: 3245

Enter Player Name (Q to quit): Sue

Enter score for Sue: 1098

Enter Player Name (Q to quit): Dave

Enter score for Dave: 8219

Enter Player Name (Q to quit): Pat

Enter score for Pat: 3217

Enter Player Name (Q to quit): Q

 

Name  Score

Bob  3245

Sue  1098

Dave  8219

Pat  3217

 

Average Score: 3944.75

 

Players who scored below average

Name  Score

Bob   3245

Sue  1098

Pat  3217

Press any key to continue . . .

Step 2: Processing Logic

Using the pseudocode below, write the code that will meet the requirements.

Main Function

Declare the player name and score arrays, number of players, and average score.

Call the InputData function

Call the DisplayPlayerData function

Call the CalculateAverageScore function and assign the returned value in average score

Call the DisplayBelowAverage function

InputData function

While the number of players is less than the length of the array

Prompt for the player’s name

If the user entered Q, break out of the loop

Prompt the user for the player’s score

Add 1 to the number of players

End-While

DisplayPlayerData function

Display the name and score of each player

CalculateAverageScore function

Add up the scores and divide by the number of scores to calculate the average score

Display the average score

Return the average score to main

DisplayBelowAverage function

Display the names and scores of all players who scored below the average score

Step 3: Create a New Project

Create a new project and name it LAB5A. Write your code using the Processing Logic in Part A, Step 2. Make sure you save your program.

 

Step 4: Compile and Execute

a)  Compile your program. Eliminate all syntax errors.

b)  Build your program and verify the results of the program. Make corrections to the program logic if necessary until the results of the program execution are what you expect.

Step 5: Print Screen Shots and Program

Capture a screen print of your output. (Do a PRINT SCREEN and paste into an MS Word document.) Copy your code and paste it into the same MS Word document that contains the screen print of your output. Save the Word document as Lab05A_LastName_FirstInitial.

END OF PART A

 

 

 

 

Part B: Pig Latin

Step 1: Requirements

Write a program that will input a phrase and convert it to pig latin. Put each word in a separate element of a string array. Remove the first letter from each word and concatenate it to the end of the word followed by “ay.”

Sample Output from Program:

*****************************************************

*  You will be prompted to enter a string of  *

*  words. The string will be converted into  *

*  Pig Latin and the results displayed.  *

*  Enter as many strings as you would like.  *
******************************************************

 

Enter a group of words or ENTER to quit: Computer Programming is fun to learn!

 

Original words: Computer Programming is fun to learn!

New Words: omputercay ogrammingpray isway unfay otay earnlay!

 

Enter a group of words or ENTER to quit: Quit

Pig Latin Hint:
If a word begins with one or more consonants, move the consonant or consonant cluster to the end of the word. Add the letters “ay” to the end of the word. So, “pig” would be “igpay,” and “latin” would be “atinlay.”

 

Step 2: Processing Logic

Using the pseudocode below, write the code that will meet the requirements.

Main function

Display the heading

While the condition is true

Prompt the user for group of words or Enter to quit

Display original words

Call function pigLatinString( )

End while

pigLatinString( ) function

Declare and initialize string variables len, counter, start, begin, word and newString

While condition is true

Call find() and pass a space and start as parameters and return the returned value

to start

if start equals to string::npos

jump outside the loop permanently

call substr() function

display the word

update newString

increment start by one

assign start to begin

End While

Call substr()

Update newString

Return newString

 

Step 3: Create a New Project

Create a new project and name it LAB5B. Write your code using the Processing Logic in Part B, Step 2. Make sure you save your program.

 

Step 4: Compile and Execute

a)  Compile your program. Eliminate all syntax errors.

b)  Build your program and verify the results of the program. Make corrections to the program logic if necessary until the results of the program execution are what you expect.

Step 5: Print Screen Shots and Program

 

Capture a screen print of your output. (Do a PRINT SCREEN and paste into an MS Word document.) Copy your code and paste it into the same MS Word document that contains the screen print of your output. Save the Word document as Lab05B_LastName_FirstInitial.

END OF LAB

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CIS 170C iLab 3 of 7: Looping | DeVry Online Help

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Lab # CIS CIS170C-A3 Lab 3 of 7: Looping Lab Overview – Scenario/Summary

You will code, build, and execute a program that will use looping to determine the score for a diver based on individual judge’s scores.

Learning outcomes:

Become familiar with the different types of looping structures. Be able to debug a program of syntax and logic errors. Be able to use the debug step-into feature to step through the logic of the program and to see how the variables change values.

 

 

Deliverables

Section

Deliverable

Points

Lab 3

Step 6: Program Listing and Output

45

 

Lab Steps

 

Preparation:

If you are using the Citrix remote lab, follow the login instructions located on the iLab tab in Course Home.

Locate the Visual Studio 2010 icon and launch the application.

 

Lab:

Step 1: Requirements – DIVER Scoring Program

Your State Dive Association presently scores its diving competitions with pencil and paper. They would like for you to design and develop a Dive Program in C++.

The paper forms that they presently use have the following:

Diver’s Name, City
JudgeScore1  – The scores entered are from 0 to 10.
JudgeScore2
JudgeScore3
JudgeScore4
JudgeScore5
DegreeOfDifficulty – This is assigned once for each diver.
OverAllScore – The overall score is the individual diver’s scores totaled and then divided by the degree of difficulty. The highest and lowest scores are removed as they are often skewed entries. Total the three scores left, divide them by 3, and then multiply that by the DegreeOfDifficulty. The degree of difficulty ranges from 1.00 to 1.67.

Display the diver’s information and overall score.

When the competition is complete, there is a summary reportcreated that lists the total number of divers and the average of the overall scores.

Lab hints: When writing this lab, use nested loops. A nested loop is when one loop is completely contained in another loop. In an inner loop, you will read the five scores one at a time. Every time you read the score (in the loop), you will compare the score to the highest so far and also to the lowest so far so you can determine the highest and lowest scores, in addition to adding the scores up one at a time.

You also need to have your program process multiple divers. Put this in an outer loop. After you process the information for one diver, prompt the user if she/he wants to process another diver. Allow the user to type either a “Y” or “y” to enter another diver’s information; otherwise, exit the loop. Write an event summary by calculating and displaying the average score for all divers and the total number of divers participating.

Garbage in Garbage Out (GIGO): The data being entered by the user needs to be validated. Scores by judges may range between 0 and 10. If the user enters an invalid score, display an error message, and prompt for the score again. Keep doing this until the user enters the score correctly. The degree of difficulty may range from 1.00 to 1.67.

Sample output from program

Report to the media

Event: Diving competition

 

Enter the diver’s name: Sue Jones

Enter the diver’s city: Dallas

Enter the score given by judge #1: 45

Invalid score – Please reenter (Valid Range: 0 – 10)

Enter the score given by judge #1: 3

Enter the score given by judge #2: 4.5

Enter the score given by judge #3: 6.7

Enter the score given by judge #4: 89

Invalid score – Please reenter (Valid Range: 0 – 10)

Enter the score given by judge #4: 8

Enter the score given by judge #5: 9.2

What was the degree of difficulty? 1.9

Invalid degree of difficulty – Please reenter (Valid Range: 1 – 1.67)

What was the degree of difficulty? 2

Invalid degree of difficulty – Please reenter (Valid Range: 1 – 1.67)

What was the degree of difficulty? 1.2

 

Diver: Sue Jones, City: Dallas

Overall score was 7.68

 

Do you want to process another diver (Y/N)? y

 

Enter the diver’s name: Dave Smith

Enter the diver’s city: Houston

Enter the score given by judge #1: 5.7

Enter the score given by judge #2: 6.8

Enter the score given by judge #3: 7.6

Enter the score given by judge #4: 8.7

Enter the score given by judge #5: 6.7

What was the degree of difficulty? 1.1

 

Diver: Dave Smith, City: Houston

Overall score was 7.74

 

Do you want to process another diver (Y/N)? n

 

EVENT SUMMARY

Number of divers participating: 2

Average score of all divers: 7.71

Press any key to continue . . .

Step 2: Processing Logic

Using the pseudocode below, write the code that will meet the requirements.

Write report heading

Loop as long as there are divers to process

Input diver’s name and city

Initialize highest score, lowest score and total score

Using a do-while loop input the 5 judge’s scores

Validate the score to ensure it is between 0 and 10

Add score to total

Determine highest and lowest scores

Input and validate the degree of difficulty

Calculate the overall diver’s score

Display the diver’s information and overall score

Add diver’s overall score to the final score

Add 1 to the number of divers

Prompt the user if she wants to process another diver

End-Loop

 

Calculate the average score for all divers

Display the number of divers and the average score for all divers

 

Step 3: Create a New Project

Create a new project and name it LAB3.

Write your code using the Processing Logic in Step 2.  Make sure to save your program.

 

Step 4: Build Solution

To compile the program, click Debug then Build solution (F7). You should receive no error messages. If you see some error messages, check the code above to make sure you didn’t key in something wrong. Once you make your corrections to the code, go ahead and click Build >> Build Solution again.

 

Step 5: Execute the Program

Once you have no syntax errors, to execute or run your program, click Debug on the menu bar and then click Start Debugging.

Step 6: Capture the Output

Capture a screen print of your output. (Do a PRINT SCREEN and paste into an MS Word document.) Copy your code and paste it into the same MS Word document that contains the screen print of your output. Save the Word document as Lab03_LastName_FirstInitial.

 

END OF LAB

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CIS 170 iLab 2 of 7: Decisions

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Lab # CIS CIS170C-A2 Lab 2 of 7: Decisions Lab Overview – Scenario/Summary

You will code, build, and execute two programs requiring decisions. The first program will determine the smaller of two numbers input on the screen. The second program will calculate the shipping charge based on the purchase amount input on the screen.

Learning outcomes:

To be able to design program logic using either a flowchart or pseudocode To be able to define and use data types To be able to prompt the user for input To be able to use the assignment statement for calculations To be able to display output to the console in a formatted manner To be able to debug a program of syntax and logic errors To be able to make decisions

 

Deliverables

Section

Deliverable

Points

Part A

Step 7: Program Listing and Output

20

Part B

Step 7: Program Listing and Output

25

 

Lab Steps

 

Preparation:

 

If you are using the Citrix remote lab, follow the login instructions located in the iLab tab in Course Home.

Locate the Visual Studio 2010 icon and launch the application.

Lab:

Part A: Determine Smallest Number

Step 1: Requirements

Write a program that inputs two numbers and determines which of the two numbers is the smallest. If the numbers are equal, display a message that they are equal.

 

Sample output from program:

 

You will be asked to enter two numbers.

The smallest value will be displayed or a message if they are the same.

 

Please enter a numeric value: 4

Please enter a numeric value: 7

 

The smallest value is 4

Press any key to continue . . .

 

AND THEN:

Please enter a numeric value: 7

Please enter a numeric value: 4

 

The smallest value is 4

Press any key to continue . . .

 

Step 2: Pseudocode

Using the pseudocode below, write the code that will meet the requirements:

Display description of program

Prompt the user for the first number

Prompt the user for the second number

If first number equals second number

Display the two numbers are equal

Else

If first number is greater than second number

Assign second number to smallest

Else

Assign first number to smallest

End-If

Display smallest number

End-If

Step 3: Create a New Project

Create a new project and name it LAB2A. Write your code using the processing logic in Part A, Step 2.

Step 4: Save Program

Save your program by clicking File on the menu bar and then clicking Save Program.cpp, or by clicking the Save button on the toolbar, or Ctrl + S.

 

Step 5: Build Solution

To compile the program, click Debug and then Build solution (F7). You should receive no error messages. If you see some error messages, check the code above to make sure you didn’t key in something wrong. Once you make your corrections to the code, go ahead and click Build >> Build Solution again.

 

Step 6: Execute the Program

Once you have no syntax errors, to execute or run your program, click Debug on the menu bar, and then click Start Debugging.

 

Step 7: Capture the Output

 

Capture a screen print of your output. (Do a PRINT SCREEN and paste into an MS Word document.) Copy your code and paste it into the same MS Word document that contains the screen print of your output. Save the Word Document as Lab02A_LastName_FirstInitial.

 

 

END OF PART A

 

 

Part B: Calculate Shipping Charge

Step 1: Requirements

Write a program that inputs the amount of the purchase and calculates the shipping charge based on the following table:

$0.00 – $250.00: $5.00

$250.01 – $500.00: $8.00

$500.01 – $1,000.00: $10.00

$1,000.01 – $5,000.00: $15.00

over $5,000.00: $20.00

 

Sample Output from Program:

Enter a purchase amount to find out your shipping charges.

 

Please enter the amount of your purchase: 234.65

The shipping charge on a purchase of $234.65 is $5.00.

 

Press any key to continue . . .

 

Step 2: Pseudocode

Using the pseudocode below, write the code that will meet the requirements.

Display program information

Prompt the user for the sale amount

If sale amount > $5,000.00

shipping is $20.00

Else if sale amount > $1,000.00

shipping is $15.00

Else if sale amount > $500.00

shipping is $10.00

Else if sale amount > $250.00

shipping is $8.00

Else if sale amount > $0.00

shipping is $5.00

Else

shipping is $0.00

End-If

 

If shipping is $0.00

Display “Error incorrect input”

Else

Display sale amount and shipping charge

End-If

 

Step 3: Create a New Project

Create a new project and name it LAB2B. Make sure you close your previous program by clicking File >> Close Solution. Write your code using the Processing Logic in Part B Step 2.

Step 4: Save Program

Save your program by clicking File on the menu bar and then clicking Save Program.cpp, or by clicking the Save button on the toolbar, or Ctrl + S.

 

Step 5: Build Solution

To compile the program, click Debug then Build solution (F7). You should receive no error messages. If you see some error messages, check the code above to make sure you didn’t key in something wrong. Once you make your corrections to the code, go ahead and click Build >> Build Solution again.

 

Step 6: Execute the Program

Once you have no syntax errors, to execute or run your program, click Debug on the menu bar, and then click Start Debugging.

 

Step 7: Capture the Output

 

Capture a screen print of your output. (Do a PRINT SCREEN and paste into an MS Word document.) Copy your code and paste it into the same MS Word document that contains the screen print of your output. Save the Word Document as Lab02B_LastName_FirstInitial.

 

END OF PART B

END OF LAB

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CIS 170C iLab 7 of 7: Sequential Files | DeVry Online Help

CIS 170C iLab 7 of 7: Sequential Files | DeVry Online Help | CIS 170 Full Course | Scoop.it

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Lab # CIS CIS170C-A7  Lab 7 of 7: Sequential Files Lab Overview – Scenario/Summary

You will code, build, and execute a program that requires sequential files to create an address database.

Learning Outcomes

Continue using a menu system with console applications Be able to write a console application Demonstrate entering, appending, storing, and retrieving records Be able to write lines of output to a text file in order to create a report

 

Deliverables

Section

Deliverable

Points

Step

Program Listing and Output

45

Lab Steps

 

Preparation:

If you are using the Citrix remote lab, follow the login instructions located in the iLab tab in Course Home.

Locate the Visual Studio 2010 icon and launch the application.

Lab:

Step 1: Requirements: An Address Database

Create a C++ console application that will store and retrieve names and addresses in a text file.

The program should do the following.

It should accept a series of names and addresses from the console. The user’s input should be written to a text file in the CSV format described in the lecture, but do not include the field names in the first row of the file. Read the records from the text file, and display them in a user-friendly format. Provide a menu to allow the user to append records to the file, display the records, or exit the application.

Build upon the code below to complete the assignment.

//Specification: Append and display records in a address database

#include <iostream>
#include <fstream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

void menu(void);
void writeData(void);
void readData(void);
string * split(string, char);

const char FileName[] = “TestAddress.txt”;

int main () {
menu();
return 0;
} //end main

void menu(void) {
//allow user to choose to append records, display records or exit the program

}//end menu

void writeData(void){
//Write the Address Info to a file

}//end write data

void readData(void){
//read data from a file
//use the split function to break a
//deliminated line of text into fields

}//end read data

string * split(string theLine, char theDeliminator){
//Break theline into fields and save the fields to an array.
//Each field will occupy one element in a character array.
//theLine is a string with fields separated with theDeliminator character.
//Assumes the last field in the string is terminated with a newline.
//Useage: string *(lineBuffer, ‘,’);

//determine how many splits there will be so we can size our array
int ;
for(int ; i < theLine.size(); i++){
if (theLine[i] == theDeliminator)
splitCount++;
}
splitCount++; //add one more to the count because there is not an ending comma

//create an array to hold the fields
string* theFieldArray;
string[splitCount];

//split the string into seperate fields
string ;
int ;

for(int ; i < theLine.size(); i++){ //read each character and look for the deliminator
if (theLine[i] != theDeliminator) {
theField += theLine[i]; //build the field
}
else { //the deliminator was hit so save to the field to the array
theFieldArray[commaCount] = theField; //save the field to the array
;
commaCount++;
}
}
theFieldArray[commaCount] = theField; //the last field is not marked with a comma…

return theFieldArray;
} //end split

Step 2: Processing Logic

Using the pseudocode below, write the code that will meet the requirements.

The pseudocode for the writeData function is shown below.

Start

open the text file to append

start do while loop

Allow user to enter name

store name (using getline method)

Allow user to enter city

store city (using getline method)

.

.

write name, city, etc. to the file

end loop

close the file

End

The program input should appear similar to this.

Append Records

Name……….John Smith
Street………902 Union Ave
City…………Any Town
State………..TX
Zip Code……78552

“Enter another Record? (Y/N) ”

The file structure should look like this.

John Smith, 902 Union Ave, Any Town, TX, 79552
Eric Jones, 345 State Way, Fresno, CA, 93432

The file output should appear similar to the following.

Show Records
__________________________________________
Record #1
Name………..John Smith
Street……….902 Union Ave
City………….Any Town
State………..TX
Zip Code……78552
__________________________________________
Record #2
Name………..Eric Jones
Street……….345 State Way
City………….Fresno
State………..CA
Zip Code…….93432
__________________________________________

(A)ppend Records, (S)how Records, (E)xit

 

Step 3: Create a New Project

Create a new project and name it LAB7. Write your code using the processing logic in Step 2. Make sure you save your program.

Step 4: Compile and Execute

a)  Compile your program. Eliminate all the syntax errors.

b)  Build your program and verify the results of the program. Make corrections to the program logic, if necessary, until the results of the program execution are what you expect.

Step 5: Print Screenshots and Program

 

Capture a screen print of your output. (Do a print screen and paste into an MS Word document.) Copy your code and paste it into the same MS Word document that contains the screen print of your output. Save the Word document as Lab07_LastName_FirstInitial.

END OF LAB

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CIS 170C iLab 4 of 7: Functions

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Lab # CIS CIS170C-A4 Lab 4 of 7:  Functions Lab Overview – Scenario/Summary

You will code, build, and execute a program that simulates the dialing of a phone using functions.

Learning outcomes:

Distinguish between pass by value and by reference. Call functions using &. Write functions using value and reference. Be able to define and use global named constants. Be able to debug a program with syntax and logic errors. Be able to use the debug step-into feature to step through the logic of the program and to see how the variables change values.

 

Deliverables

Section

Deliverable

Points

Lab 4

Step 5: Program Listing and Output

45

 

Lab Steps

Preparation:

If you are using the Citrix remote lab, follow the login instructions located in the iLab tab in Course Home.

Locate the Visual Studio 2010 icon and launch the application.

Lab:

Step 1: Requirements: Phone-Dialing Program

Write a program that simulates the dialing of a phone number.

A user will input an 8-place number, for example: UN9-3177 (note that the hyphen is considered a digit).

The rules for entering phone numbers follow.

8 places It may have numbers, letters, or both. The phone number cannot begin with 555. The phone number cannot begin with 0. The hyphen must be in the 4th position. No other characters (@#$%^&*()_+=\|/><etc.) are allowed. If a letter is entered, its output will be a number (check your phone pad). Enter Q to Quit.

If all of the rules are met, you will output a message to the console that reads like the following.
Phone Number Dialed: UN9-3177 *the number entered

If all of the rules are not met, then you output one of the following error messages to the console.

ERROR – Phone number cannot begin with 555 ERROR – Phone number cannot begin with 0 ERROR – Hyphen is not in the correct position ERROR – An invalid character was entered

 

It will then prompt the user to try again.

This should be a lot of fun!

Here are some great things to think about as you begin your program!

Define a function named ReadDials() that reads each digit and letter dialed into 8 separate char variables (DO NOT USE ARRAYS). All the digits are sent back through parameters by reference.

Then, for each digit, the program will use a function named ToDigit(), which receives a single char argument (pass by reference) that may be a number or a letter of one of the digits dialed.

If it is a number, then return 0 by value indicating that it is a valid digit. If the digit is a letter, then the number corresponding to the letter is returned by reference, and return 0 by value indicating that it is a valid digit. Here are the letters associated with each digit.

 

5

J  K  L

1

6

M  N  O

2

A  B  C

7

P  Q  R  S

3

D  E  F

8

T  U  V

4

G  H  I

9

W  X  Y  Z

If the digit entered is not one of the valid digits or one of the valid letters, return –1 by value indicating that you have an invalid digit.

A phone number never begins with a 0, so the program should flag an error if such a number is entered. Make ReadDials() return –2 in this case.

A phone number never begins with 555, so the program should flag an error if such a number is entered. Make ReadDials() return –3 in this case.

A phone number always has a hyphen (-) in the 4th position. Make ReadDials() return –4 in this case (if it doesn’t have a hyphen in the 4th position). If a hyphen is in any other position, it is considered an invalid digit.

If the phone number is valid, the main calls the AcknowledgeCall function to write the converted number to the output file.

All the logic of the program should be put in functions that are called from Main(): ReadDials() and AcknowledgeCall().

The ToDigits() function is called from the ReadDials() function and is used to convert each letter entered individually into a digit and to verify that the user has entered a valid phone number. Have the program work for any number of phone numbers.

In the ToDigits() function uses the toupper function to convert any letters entered to uppercase. All the error messages are to be written to the output file from main() based on the return value from the functions.

Continue processing until the user enters a Q.

You will set up the 8 char variables to hold the digits of the phone number in main() and pass the variables to the functions by reference.

Sample Output from the Program

Enter a phone number (Q to quit): 213-2121

Phone Number Dialed: 213-2121

Enter a phone number (Q to quit): asc-dfer

Phone Number Dialed: 272-3337

Enter a phone number (Q to quit): 555-resw

ERROR – Phone number cannot begin with 555

Enter a phone number (Q to quit): 098-8765

ERROR – Phone number cannot begin with 0

Enter a phone number (Q to quit): 12345678

ERROR – Hyphen is not in the correct position

Enter a phone number (Q to quit): @34-*uyt

ERROR – An invalid character was entered

Enter a phone number (Q to quit): Q

Press any key to continue . . .

 

Step 2: Processing Logic

Using the pseudocode below, write the code that will meet the requirements.

Main Function
Declare the char variables for the 8 digits of the phone number

while true
Call the ReadDials function passing the 8 digits
by reference.  ReadDials returns an error code by
value.

If the return value is -5, exit the do while loop

If the error code is -1, display the
error message “ERROR – An invalid character was entered”.
If the error code is -2, display the
error message “ERROR – Phone number cannot begin with 0″.
If the error code is -3, display the
error message “ERROR – Phone number cannot begin with 555″.
If the error code is -4, display the
error message “ERROR – Hyphen is not in the correct position”.
Otherwise, call the AcknowledgeCall function
End-While

ReadDials function

Input the first digit
If a Q was entered, return -5.
Input the rest of the phone number

Call the ToDigit function for each of the 7 digits
not for digit 4
If ToDigit returns -1, return -1
If digit 4 is not a hyphen, return -4.
If digit 1 is 0, return -2.
If digits 1 – 3 are 5, return -3
Otherwise, return 0

ToDigit function
Convert the digit to upper case
Use a switch statement to determine if the digit is valid
and convert the letters to digits

If the digit is invalid, return -1.
If the digit is valid, return 0.

AcknowledgeCall function
Display the Phone Number.

Step 3: Create a New Project

Create a new project and name it LAB4.

Write your code using the processing logic in Step 2 (above). Make sure that you save your program.

 

Step 4: Compile and Execute

a)  Compile your program. Eliminate all the syntax errors.

b)  Build your program and verify the results of the program. Make corrections to the program logic, if necessary, until the results of the program execution are what you expect.

Step 5: Print Screen Shots and Program

Capture a screen print of your output (do a print screen and paste into an MS Word document). Copy your code and paste it into the same MS Word document that contains the screen print of your output. Save the Word document as Lab04_LastName_FirstInitial.

END OF LAB

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Lab 1 of 7: Getting Started (Your First C++ Programs) Lab Overview – Scenario/Summary

Welcome to Programming with C++. The purpose of this three-part lab is to walk you through the following tutorial to become familiar with the actions of compiling and executing a C++ program.

In general, this lab will instruct you on:

how to create a project; how to enter and save a program; how to compile and run a program; how to, given a simple problem using input and output, code and test a program that meets the specifications; and how to debug a simple program of any syntax and logic errors.

 

Deliverables

Section

Deliverable

Points

Part A

Step 6: Program Listing and Output

15

Part B

Program Listing and Output

15

Part C

Program Listing and Output

15

Lab Steps

 

Preparation:

If you are using the Citrix remote lab, follow the login instructions located in the iLab tab in Course Home.

Lab:

Part A: Getting Started

Step 1: Start the Application

From the File menu, choose “New Project.” Choose “Win32 Console Application.” Enter a name in the name field. Click “Next” and choose the following options: Application Type: “Console Application” Additional options: Check mark “Empty project” and uncheck 8. Click Finish. Your project is now created.

Step 2: How to Add a Source Code File to Your Project (.cpp file)

 

In the Solution Explorer, right-click on the “Source Files” folder and select “Add” and then “New Item.” In the next dialog box, choose C++ file (.cpp), enter a name for your source code file, and press the Add button. Type or copy and paste your code into the newly created source code file. Build the file by pressing F7, and then execute your program by pressing CTRL-F5 (start without debugging) or use the F5 key (Start Debugging).

 

Step 3: Create a Source Code File

Now enter the following C++ program exactly as you see it. Use the tab where appropriate. [Note: C++ is case sensitive.] Instead of John Doe, type your name.

#include <iostream>

 

using namespace std;

void main()

{

cout << “John Doe” << endl;

cout << “CIS170C – Programming using C++\n”;

cout << “\n\n\nHello, world!\n\n”;

 

}

When you execute a program in debug mode (F5), the console screen may appear and disappear

before you have an opportunity to view your output. There are several techniques you can use to

pause the console screen so you can read the output. On the very last line in the main() function:

a. insert the statement: system(“pause”);

-OR-

b. insert an input statement: cin << myVarable;

 

Step 4: Output

The black screen or console should read:

John Doe

CIS170C – Programming using C++
Hello, World   -

Step 5: Save Program

Save your program by clicking File on the menu bar and then clicking Save Program.cpp, or by clicking the Save button on the toolbar, or Ctrl + S.

 

Step 6: Build Solution

To compile the program, click Build on the menu bar and then click the BuildSolution or Build LabA option. You should receive no error messages. If you see some error messages, check the code above to make sure you didn’t key in something wrong. Once you make your corrections to the code, go ahead and click Build >> Build Solution again.

 

Step 7: Execute the Program

Once you have no syntax errors, to execute or run your program, click Debug on the menu bar, and then click Start Without Debugging.

 

Step 8: Capture the Output

Print a picture of your screen output. (Do a print screen and paste this into MS Word.)

 

Step 9: Print the Source Code

Copy your source code and paste it into the same Word document as your screen print. Save the Word Document as Lab01A_LastName_FirstInitial

 

Note: Using the Visual Studio editor to compile your programs creates a lot of overhead. These additional files will become important as you create more sophisticated C# projects. Projects can contain one or more source-code files. For this course, you will not have to worry about all the extra files that are created.

 

End of Part A

Part B: Calculate Total Tickets

Step 1: Create New Project

Now create a new project and name it LAB1B. Make sure you close your previous program by clicking File >> Close Solution.

Step 2: Type in Program

Like before, enter the following program. Type in your name for Developer and current date for Date Written.

// —————————————————————

// Programming Assignment:  LAB1B

// Developer:  ______________________

// Date Written:  ______________________

// Purpose:  Ticket Calculation Program

// —————————————————————

#include <iostream>

 

using namespace std;

void main()

{

int childTkts, adultTkts, totalTkts;

;

;

+ adultTkts;

cout << totalTkts << endl;

}

 

Step 3: Save Program

Save your program by clicking File on the menu bar and then clicking Save Program.cpp, or by clicking the Save button on the toolbar, or Ctrl + S.

 

Step 4: Build Solution

To compile the program, click Build on the menu bar and then click the BuildSolution or Build LabB option. You should receive no error messages. If you see some error messages, check the code above to make sure you didn’t key in something wrong. Once you make your corrections to the code, go ahead and click Build >> Build Solution again.

 

Step 5: Execute the Program

Once you have no syntax errors, to execute or run your program, click Debug on the menu bar, and then click Start Without Debugging.

 

Step 6: Capture the Output

Capture a screen print of your output. (Do a PRINT SCREEN and paste into an MS Word document.) Copy your code and paste it into the same MS Word document that contains the screen print of your output. 3.  Save the Word Document as Lab01B_LastName_FirstInitial.

End of Part B

 

 

Part C: Payroll Program

Step 1: Create a New Project

Create a new project and name it LAB1C. Make sure you close your previous program by clicking File >> Close Solution.

Include a comment box like what you coded in Part B. This can go at the very top of your program.

Step 2: Processing Logic

You need to write a program that calculates and displays the take-home pay for a commissioned sales employee along with all of the deductions.

Input: Prompt the user for the weekly sales.

Process: Perform the calculations. The employee receives 7% of his or her total sales as his or her gross pay. His or her federal tax rate is 18%. He or she contributes 10% to his or her retirement program and 6% to Social Security.

Output: Display the results

Sample Output from Lab 1:
Enter Weekly Sales: 28000

Total Sales:  28000.00
Gross pay (7%):  1960.00

Federal tax paid:   352.80
Social security paid:   117.60
Retirement contribution:  196.00
Total deductions:   666.40

Take home pay:   1293.60
Press any key to continue . . .

Flowchart: (continued on next page)

Pseudo Code:

 

1.   Declare variables 2.  Accept Input – weeklySales 3.  Calculate Gross Sales * .07 4.  Calculate Federal Pay * .18 5.  Calculate Social Pay * .06 6.  Calculate Pay * .1 7.  Calculate Total Tax + Social Security + Retirement 8.  Calculate Total Take Home Pay – Total Deductions 9.  Display the following on separate lines and format variables with $ and decimal. a.  Total Sales Amount:  value of weekly sales b.  Gross Pay (.07):  value of gross pay c.  Federal Tax paid (.18):  value of federal tax d.  Social Security paid (.06):   value of social security e.  Retirement contribution (.1):  value of retirement f.  Total Deductions:  value of total deductions g.  Take Home Pay:   value of take home pay

 

Note: Use SetPrecisions(2) to format the output (see page 98 of the text). The statements should look something like the following:

 

//include the iomanip header file at the top of the file

#include <iomanip>

//use fixed and setprecision(2) to format the number

//use setw(8) to control the width of the field

//use \t to control the spacing between fields

cout << fixed << setprecision(2);

cout << “Gross Pay (0.07):\t $” << setw(8) << grossPay << endl;

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CIS 170 all ilabs weeks 1-7 | DeVry Online Help

CIS 170 all ilabs weeks 1-7 | DeVry Online Help | CIS 170 Full Course | Scoop.it

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CIS 170C iLab 1 of 7: Getting Started

 

CIS 170 iLab 2 of 7: Decisions

 

CIS 170C iLab 3 of 7: Looping

 

CIS 170C iLab 4 of 7: Functions

 

CIS 170C iLab 5 of 7: Arrays and Strings

 

CIS 170C Lab 6 of 7: Menu-Driven Application

 

CIS 170C iLab 7 of 7: Sequential Files

 

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