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Chronique d'un pays où il ne se passe rien... ou presque !
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Rescooped by Daniel Denninger from Geography Education
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Comparing Urban Footprints

Comparing Urban Footprints | Chronique d'un pays où il ne se passe rien... ou presque ! | Scoop.it

"This is a series of infographics (or geo-infographics) created by Matthew Hartzell, a friend of mine that I met when we were both geography graduate students at Penn State in few years back..."


Via Seth Dixon
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Marcelle Searles's curator insight, January 25, 1:41 AM

useful for both Year 8 and Year 11 Geography.

Blake Welborn's curator insight, May 20, 9:15 AM

This a conglomeration of maps that represent the physical layout and land use of some of the major cities in the world, color coded by region. 

Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 18, 9:49 AM

The comparison of urban footprints certainly puts a lot of factors into perspective.  Whenever I am in highly populated areas such as Atlanta and New York, I feel like the area is so densely populated. But shift over to Sao Paulo which is so much smaller than New York, but just as populated.

Rescooped by Daniel Denninger from landscape architecture & sustainability
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Sustainable Housing in Denmark by Lendager Architects

Sustainable Housing in Denmark by Lendager Architects | Chronique d'un pays où il ne se passe rien... ou presque ! | Scoop.it
Lendager Architects announced their first prize win in the competition to build the first DGNB-certified housing project in Denmark in Næstved.

DGNB is a new green building certification system expected to become the scale for sustainability in Europe. DGNB-Certification focuses on three equally weighted parameters: Environmental-, Social- and economical sustainability, for a holistic evaluation of built projects.

In total, the project will have 24 single family homes, built around a shared courtyard to encourage community and shared resources. Passive solar design with optimized window and shade placement allows for passive cooling and heating. Energy efficient design, including a tight thermal envelope with energy saving systems reduces power consumption, while rooftop photovoltaics produce electricity. Green roofs protect the home and provide further insulation. A close connection with nature and gardens encourages residents to live off the land.

As Lendager Architects told us about the project, “We wanted to answer the questions of how we can build without affecting the environment, how we can build without using new materials, how we can build houses that produce more energy than they use, and how sharing becomes a natural part of the daily life.”
Via Lauren Moss, landscape architecture &sustainability
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