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Chronique d'un pays où il ne se passe rien... ou presque !
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Rescooped by Daniel Denninger from Geography Education
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49 Maps That Explain The U.S.

49 Maps That Explain The U.S. | Chronique d'un pays où il ne se passe rien... ou presque ! | Scoop.it

"49 Maps That Explain The U.S. For Dumb Foreigners--The United States is mind-boggling. Right?!"


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Matthew Richmond's curator insight, September 16, 2015 2:00 PM

Some of them are quite fascinating. Scooped from my professor.

Alex Vielman's curator insight, September 21, 2015 11:10 PM

It's to see these "maps" that "explain" the U.S. in almost a sarcastic matter. Americans are living in what researches call megaregions. After, doing our Map of the U.S. for an assignment, it becomes difficult to divide regions when one is so familiar with one area, in my case, New England. New England, or the Northeast, is considered a megaregion because there is high population density in this area. In the map that displays these megaregions, its interesting to see those areas that are emerging. For example, in the map it saids Cascadia is emegering which is the corner of the U.S., the state of Washington. 

Some people think that the U.S. population is spread throughout the whole map. Its interesting to actually realize that 47% of the U.S. has zero population. This was an awesome article thats loaded with fun interesting facts. 

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, November 23, 2015 2:32 PM

Understanding the landscape of our Country is important. The way to best understand it is to look at maps, especially these maps, and get a hold on what the country looks like. From the height of exploration to seeing where the most trees are within the country. This map has a lot of information for anyone who has questions.

Rescooped by Daniel Denninger from Geography Education
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The world's oldest living tree

The world's oldest living tree | Chronique d'un pays où il ne se passe rien... ou presque ! | Scoop.it
At 4,841 years old, this ancient bristlecone pine is the oldest known non-clonal organism on Earth. Located in the White Mountains of California, in Inyo National Forest, Methuselah's exact location is kept a close secret in order to protect it from the public. (An older specimen named Prometheus, which was about 4,900 years old, was cut down by a researcher in 1964 with the U.S. Forest Service's permission.) Today you can visit the grove where Methuselah hides, but you'll have to guess at which tree it is. Could this one be it?

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 31, 2014 2:44 PM

I freely admit that I have a strange fascination with the twists and turns in a majestic tree; I find that they are great reminders of the wonders and beauty to be found on Earth. 


Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, historical, California.

Beatrice Do's curator insight, January 31, 2014 3:40 PM

the exact location is kept a close secret O_O

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, February 5, 2014 7:17 PM

After reading this article, I am pleased to know that the world oldest non-clonal organism is located in California. It is amazing that a tree could still stand after almost 5,000 years. Hopefully, people do not destroy this tree, as it is fascinating. 

Rescooped by Daniel Denninger from Geography Education
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The Invasion of America

The Invasion of America | Chronique d'un pays où il ne se passe rien... ou presque ! | Scoop.it

This interactive map, produced by University of Georgia historian Claudio Saunt to accompany his new book West of the Revolution: An Uncommon History of 1776, offers a time-lapse vision of the transfer of Indian land between 1776 and 1887. As blue “Indian homelands” disappear, small red areas appear, indicating the establishment of reservations (above is a static image of the map; visit the map's page to play with its features).


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 18, 2014 11:13 AM

In the past I've shared maps that show the historic expansion of the United States--a temporal and spatial visualization of Manifest Destiny.  The difference with this interactive is that the narrative focuses on the declining territory controlled by Native Americans instead of the growth of the United States.  That may seem a minor detail, but how history is told shapes our perception of events, identities and places.

 

Tags: USA, historicalmapping, visualization

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 23, 2014 12:25 PM

unit 1 Perception and bias of maps

Tom Cockburn's curator insight, June 24, 2014 5:51 AM

This will likely resonate with 'first peoples' everywhere

Rescooped by Daniel Denninger from Geography Education
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Space archaeologist unlocks secrets of ancient civilizations

Space archaeologist unlocks secrets of ancient civilizations | Chronique d'un pays où il ne se passe rien... ou presque ! | Scoop.it
Dr Sarah Parcak uses satellite technology to unearth Egypt's ancient settlements, pyramids and palaces lost in the sands of time.

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Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 4, 2014 12:10 AM

It is interesting to find out that in this specific article there is controversy over the looting of tombs over 5,000 years ago as soon as the deceased were buried there were many more looting acts taken place. The Arab spring is an important landmark to think of when relating this to the reading.

Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 20, 2014 11:51 AM

This describes human characteristics that defined this region because it shows how ancient artifacts are being unearthed through new-age technology.

Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, March 19, 2015 10:49 AM

Space archaeology only makes sense.  If we have the capability for satellites to take pictures of earth from above why shouldn't it be used for archaeological analysis?  I am sure that this is only the tip of the iceberg as far as what we will see in the future from this specific field. This article/video just lends more credibility to the fact that Archaeology should function as an interdisciplinary field.