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Chronique d'un pays où il ne se passe rien... ou presque !
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Rescooped by Daniel Denninger from Geography Education
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Ship-Shipping Ships

Ship-Shipping Ships | Chronique d'un pays où il ne se passe rien... ou presque ! | Scoop.it

"This is a ship-shipping ship, shipping shipping ships."  http://geographyeducation.org/2013/10/14/ship-shipping-ships/

 


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Jamie Strickland's curator insight, October 15, 2013 10:35 AM

First, this is a fantastic photo...a freighter shipping other freighters.  As my colleague Seth Dixon points out, this is a fantastic image of one of the important drivers of the acceleration of globalization in recent history.  

jim dzialo's curator insight, October 16, 2013 11:54 AM

Pretty sure that doesn't fit in the panama canal

 

L.Long's curator insight, February 16, 1:28 AM

The two industries that are the real backbone of globalization are transportation and communication.  What has accelerated the pace of global interconnectedness is the scale of these devices and their ubiquity in facilitating massive global commerce.

Rescooped by Daniel Denninger from Geography Education
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Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s

Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s | Chronique d'un pays où il ne se passe rien... ou presque ! | Scoop.it
What America can learn from one of the most sustainable food nations on Earth.

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Jess Deady's curator insight, February 20, 3:27 PM

McDonalds is a social and economical chain restaurant that has not made its way to Bolivia. Sure, they like hamburgers but they prefer to get them from the women hawking them on the streets. Who can blame them? When is the last time you bought something that was made in America? Probably a couple weeks or months even. Cultural traditions are fading out fast and moves like this are what will keep Bolivians culturally enabled.

Paige Therien's curator insight, March 1, 1:21 PM

There is much valuable information to learn from other countries and cultures, especially when it comes to food because subsistence greatly shapes a culture.  Of course, the United States is very different than Bolivia in terms of culture and geography, but there is a lot to take away from the structural rejection of McDonalds in Bolivia.  Bolivia has taken advantage of the altitudinal zonation that is characteristic of their mountainous country; they have formed a system of reciprocity which fosters strong community and leaves no room for giant food corporations such as McDonald.  If people in the United States want a change in their food systems, the first step is rejecting the systems that should not play a role, but currently do.  Institutions like McDonalds have allowed people to be so far removed from their food sources, and ultimately, an important characteristic unique to humanity (food producers).

Amy Marques's curator insight, April 24, 6:41 AM

       It's interesting that globalization is one of the reasons for the growth of fast food chains like McDonald’s around the world. It’s hard for countries to turn down a food company who really does configure their menu to the consumers their serving. I find it interesting that Bolivia found a way to resist this. Its topography is what made the last store close in 2002. McDonald’s couldn’t survive in the mountainous country with the Andes and the Amazon. They were able to resist because the nation always prioritized local control of its food system and eating healthy. Its people value food, food producers, and their ecosystems