Chronique d'un pays où il ne se passe rien... ou presque !
4.0K views | +2 today
Follow
Chronique d'un pays où il ne se passe rien... ou presque !
« Je ne cherche pas à connaître les réponses, je cherche à comprendre les questions. »
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Daniel Denninger from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Harvest 2013

Harvest 2013 | Chronique d'un pays où il ne se passe rien... ou presque ! | Scoop.it
From grains to grapes to cabbage and many other crops the harvest season has been in full swing in the Northern Hemisphere.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, November 6, 2013 2:47 PM

Well see as how my page is called World Photography, i figurd this would be a good article/gallery to put up. Along with so georgous photos one can really see the imporance of farming on a culture and farming world wide. The gallery of photos is increadible, and with a caption to match each photo you are able to see geographilycly and cultulary where certan foods and plants are produced. This makes me feel  that cultures are all some what connected, the tobbco from your cigretts comes from mexico, and the nice wine that you drink when your out to dinner is from a vineyard in germany. Its a small idea but food is very cultualy influncing 

Jessica Rieman's curator insight, April 23, 2014 2:09 PM

After reading this article it became apparent the back breaking work that these people have to endure just to stay alive and feed their family. Which is insane when you think about our society today, I dont know about you but I do not farm and do this type of work after I'm done with my school work everyday. In some places in the United States like out west they are used to some of this work but most of us do not make all of our meals and kill them in the same spot. It became apparent how much of a lifestyle this type of work is and the true dedication that people go through for themselves, family, land and economy.

BrianCaldwell7's curator insight, March 16, 2016 3:56 PM

 

So few of my students have actual experience working on a farm and being part of the food producing process.  This gallery of 38 photos around the world is a great visual to reinforce how important the harvest is for sustaining life on this planet.  The picture above shows the a Hmong hill tribe woman harvesting a rice terrace field at Mu Cang Chai district, northern Vietnamese province of Yen Bai. The World Bank on Oct. 7 lowered its 2013 growth forecast for East Asian developing countries to 7.1 percent and warned that a prolonged US fiscal crisis could be damaging to the region.

 

Tags: agriculture, food production, landscape, images.

Rescooped by Daniel Denninger from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s

Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s | Chronique d'un pays où il ne se passe rien... ou presque ! | Scoop.it
What America can learn from one of the most sustainable food nations on Earth.

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Felix Ramos Jr.'s curator insight, February 28, 2015 5:50 PM

This is a fine example of people looking out for one another.  It might be easier to industrialize their food market but it's more admirable to preserve tradition, help small indigenous business, and try your best at making the country more healthy.  I applaud them for doing this.

Brian Wilk's curator insight, March 22, 2015 3:33 PM

I think I might want to move to Bolivia one day! Reciprocity is often a term used for corporate culture; you but from me and I'll buy from you type of relationship. This is still true in Bolivia only they do it on a much more personal level. Farmers share equipment, they share crops, seeds and develop a rapport not easily undone by corporations such as McDonald's. Bolivia's multiple micro-climates allow it to grow a wide variety of foods for their citizens, thus making it easier to trade within their circle of neighborhood farmers. "I'll trade you ten pounds of potatoes for five pounds of Quinoa."

The article goes on to state that Bolivians do indeed love their hamburgers, a handful of Subway's and Burger King's still do business there, but the heritage of picking a burger from a street vendor has been passed down by generations. These cholitas, as they are called, sell their fare in the streets of Bolivia and this type of transaction is not easily duplicated by large corporations. I have added Bolivia to my bucket list...

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 30, 2015 10:28 PM

" Whats Bolivia doing so right that McDonalds couldn't make it there?"

Food is not a commericial space here.

Morales, speaking to the United Nations General Assembly in February, slammed U.S. fast-food chains, calling them a “great harm to humanity” and accusing them of trying to control food production globally.

“They impose their customs and their foods,” he said. “They seek profit and to merely standardize food, produced on a massive scale, according to the same formula and with ingredients which cause cancers and other diseases.”

Even still, with one of the lightest carbon footprints in the world, cherished food practices and progressive food sovereignty laws on the books, Bolivia could still be a model to the rest of the world—the United States especially—for a healthier, more community-based food system.

 

What an insightful read. I never thought of considering our food a s a "commercial space" but that is essentially exactly what it is. Our food has been extremely commercialized. Products our pushed through advertisement continuously. Most of the foods in America are not even real food but food products, factory made. This is absolutely a role model country for how food should be consumed.

Rescooped by Daniel Denninger from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Chipotle's Gamble

"Watch The Scarecrow, the companion film for Chipotle's new app-based game. Then download the free app at www.scarecrowgame.com and join the quest for whole sustainable food."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, October 16, 2013 7:48 AM

Sounds good. I liked the video I saw.

Liam Michelsohn's curator insight, October 21, 2013 7:27 PM

If the Owners of Chipotle are actually growing and raising their animals organically they have no choice but to approach their competitors aggressively.  Growing high volume quality food is a much more expensive and slow process then genetically modifying animals to create higher yields. I thought the commercial was beautifully done and struck a tone I wish I heard more often. 

Shelby Porter's curator insight, November 4, 2013 10:29 AM

This video probably set some of the leading fast food chains and restuarants on edge. Chipotle is starting an organic agricultural revolution, and with good reason. Most fast food cooperations are like the scare crow foods in the video, not using one hundred percent animal products, and using chemicals to enhance them. It is like that in other places too. Mnay farmers now are breeding chickens to have much larger breasts because that is what is in demand. But none of this is good for our bodies. Chipotle is one of many organic companies trying to go back to the basics and feed us food that is also good for us. They are showing us that this agricultural revolution can feed the people of the world.