Chronique d'un pa...
Follow
Find tag "environment"
2.3K views | +0 today
Chronique d'un pays où il ne se passe rien... ou presque !
« Je ne cherche pas à connaître les réponses, je cherche à comprendre les questions. »
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Daniel Denninger from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising

The world's megacities that are sinking 10 times faster than water levels are rising | Chronique d'un pays où il ne se passe rien... ou presque ! | Scoop.it
Scientists have issued a new warning to the world’s coastal megacities that the threat from subsiding land is a more immediate problem than rising sea levels caused by global warming.

 

A new paper from the Deltares Research Institute in the Netherlands published in April identified regions of the globe where the ground level is falling 10 times faster than water levels are rising - with human activity often to blame.

In Jakarta, Indonesia’s largest city, the population has grown from around half a million in the 1930s to just under 10 million today, with heavily populated areas dropping by as much as six and a half feet as groundwater is pumped up from the Earth to drink.

The same practice led to Tokyo’s ground level falling by two meters before new restrictions were introduced, and in Venice, this sort of extraction has only compounded the effects of natural subsidence caused by long-term geological processes.

 

Tags: coastal, climate change, urban, megacities, water, environment, urban ecology.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Adilson Camacho's curator insight, August 2, 12:32 AM

Perception!

Matt Evan Dobbie's curator insight, August 2, 6:55 PM

Huge problem when combined with sea level rise

MsPerry's curator insight, August 12, 6:53 PM

APHG-U7

Rescooped by Daniel Denninger from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

America’s recent drought history, animated

America’s recent drought history, animated | Chronique d'un pays où il ne se passe rien... ou presque ! | Scoop.it

"California's drought just hit a new milestone: As of this week, 32.98 percent of the state is experiencing "exceptional" drought, making it the worst drought in the 14 years that the Department of Agriculture's Drought Monitor has tracked data."


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 23, 9:23 AM

The recent drought in California has only deepened and this Washington Post article shows an animated map that highlights the temporal and spatial patterns in the drought data (hint--it's not pretty).  In a related note, May 2014 was the hottest May in recorded history.     


Questions to Consider: What are some reasons (both from human and physical geography) for this severe drought? What can be done in the short-term to lessen the problem? What can be done to make California’s water situation better for the next 50 years?


Tags: physical, weather and climate, consumptionCalifornia, water, environment, resources, environment dependurban ecology.

Leslie Kelsey's curator insight, June 25, 12:24 PM

As California's rain shortage continues, this may be a useful site for teachers and students to explore the drought over time. 

Character Minutes's curator insight, June 25, 12:56 PM

Use to emphasize the need to apply character traits of resourceful and thrifty.

Rescooped by Daniel Denninger from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

The world's oldest living tree

The world's oldest living tree | Chronique d'un pays où il ne se passe rien... ou presque ! | Scoop.it
At 4,841 years old, this ancient bristlecone pine is the oldest known non-clonal organism on Earth. Located in the White Mountains of California, in Inyo National Forest, Methuselah's exact location is kept a close secret in order to protect it from the public. (An older specimen named Prometheus, which was about 4,900 years old, was cut down by a researcher in 1964 with the U.S. Forest Service's permission.) Today you can visit the grove where Methuselah hides, but you'll have to guess at which tree it is. Could this one be it?

Via Seth Dixon
more...
Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 31, 2:44 PM

I freely admit that I have a strange fascination with the twists and turns in a majestic tree; I find that they are great reminders of the wonders and beauty to be found on Earth. 


Tags: biogeography, environmentecology, historical, California.

Beatrice Do's curator insight, January 31, 3:40 PM

the exact location is kept a close secret O_O

Joseph Thacker 's curator insight, February 5, 7:17 PM

After reading this article, I am pleased to know that the world oldest non-clonal organism is located in California. It is amazing that a tree could still stand after almost 5,000 years. Hopefully, people do not destroy this tree, as it is fascinating. 

Rescooped by Daniel Denninger from green infographics
Scoop.it!

COP 19 conference: a key step in the fight against climate change

COP 19 conference: a key step in the fight against climate change | Chronique d'un pays où il ne se passe rien... ou presque ! | Scoop.it

Sea levels and air temperatures continue to rise according to studies, which is expected to lead to more floods and worse heat waves. To help prevent this, the 19th UN Climate Conference takes place this month to discuss how to curb carbon emissions after 2020, including key steps towards a new globally binding agreement by 2015. Check out the infographic on climate change for more information.


Via Lauren Moss
more...
Alison D. Gilbert's curator insight, November 9, 2013 3:50 PM

Will we be in time? What should we do to prepare to protect ourselves?

Jenny Byrne's curator insight, November 10, 2013 12:37 AM

it's true, a picture is worth a thousand words

Rescooped by Daniel Denninger from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Drought Drains Lake Mead to Lowest Level

Drought Drains Lake Mead to Lowest Level | Chronique d'un pays où il ne se passe rien... ou presque ! | Scoop.it

"The largest reservoir in the U.S. falls to its lowest water level in history, Nevada State Sen. Tick Segerblom introduced a bill title and issued a press release on July 8 calling for an 'independent scientific and economic audit of the Bureau of Reclamation’s strategies for Colorado River management.'"

 

This week’s history-making, bad-news event at Lake Mead has already triggered lots of news stories, but almost all of these stories focus on the water supply for Las Vegas, Phoenix and California. But what about the health of the river itself?

 

Tags: physical, fluvial, drought, water, environment.


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 12, 3:09 AM

Consequences of urbanisation 

Lorraine Chaffer's curator insight, July 12, 3:10 AM

Option topic : Inland water and management

Tom Franta's curator insight, July 12, 11:40 AM

Many geographers are aware that future water resource issues in the American Southwest will have political, cultural, and social impacts.  What do you believe to be some approaching concerns after reading this article?

Rescooped by Daniel Denninger from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Where Will The World's Water Conflicts Erupt?

Where Will The World's Water Conflicts Erupt? | Chronique d'un pays où il ne se passe rien... ou presque ! | Scoop.it

As the climate shifts, rivers will both flood and dry up more often, according to the latest report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Shortages are especially likely in parts of the world already strapped for water, so political scientists expect feuds will become even more intense. To track disputes worldwide, researchers at Oregon State University spent a decade building a comprehensive database of international exchanges—-both conflicts and alliances—over shared water resources. They found that countries often begin disputes belligerently but ultimately reach peaceful agreements. Says Aaron Wolf, the geographer who leads the project, “For me the really interesting part is how even Arabs and Israelis, Indians and Pakistanis, are able to resolve their differences and find a solution.”


Via Seth Dixon
more...
Ma. Caridad Benitez's curator insight, June 19, 9:44 AM

El bien más preciado.  El recurso agotable más subvalorado del planeta. 

Adilson Camacho's curator insight, June 20, 2:50 PM

Questões políticas... 

J. Mark Schwanz's curator insight, June 21, 11:01 AM

Add water to geography education curriculum? You better believe it. The crisis of the 21st century is and will be water.  

Rescooped by Daniel Denninger from Geography Education
Scoop.it!

Drying of the Aral Sea

Explore a global timelapse of our planet, constructed from Landsat satellite imagery. With water diverted to irrigation, the inland Aral Sea has shrunk drama...

Via Seth Dixon
more...
dilaycock's curator insight, January 25, 8:25 PM

Great example of desertification.

Jason Wilhelm's curator insight, January 31, 12:37 PM

The drying up of major water sources all over the world is a major problem faced by multiple governments. The Aral Sea is the water source for a variety of countries in the region, which leads the world populatioin to the idea that a solution must be devised to moderate the water usage. The timelapse helps illustrate the ebb and flow of the water level is a tool that can be used to help learn about the crisis that is the loss of water in the Aral Sea.

Tracy Galvin's curator insight, May 5, 2:46 PM

It is scary to watch these things happen even though it is in a tiny pocket of the Earth. We need to be more conscious of the finite resources we have and find ways to not completely use up what is here.