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Chronique d'un pays où il ne se passe rien... ou presque !
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Rescooped by Daniel Denninger from Geography Education
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America’s recent drought history, animated

America’s recent drought history, animated | Chronique d'un pays où il ne se passe rien... ou presque ! | Scoop.it

"California's drought just hit a new milestone: As of this week, 32.98 percent of the state is experiencing "exceptional" drought, making it the worst drought in the 14 years that the Department of Agriculture's Drought Monitor has tracked data."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 23, 9:23 AM

The recent drought in California has only deepened and this Washington Post article shows an animated map that highlights the temporal and spatial patterns in the drought data (hint--it's not pretty).  In a related note, May 2014 was the hottest May in recorded history.     


Questions to Consider: What are some reasons (both from human and physical geography) for this severe drought? What can be done in the short-term to lessen the problem? What can be done to make California’s water situation better for the next 50 years?


Tags: physical, weather and climate, consumptionCalifornia, water, environment, resources, environment dependurban ecology.

Leslie Kelsey's curator insight, June 25, 12:24 PM

As California's rain shortage continues, this may be a useful site for teachers and students to explore the drought over time. 

Character Minutes's curator insight, June 25, 12:56 PM

Use to emphasize the need to apply character traits of resourceful and thrifty.

Rescooped by Daniel Denninger from Geography Education
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Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s

Bolivia: A Country With No McDonald’s | Chronique d'un pays où il ne se passe rien... ou presque ! | Scoop.it
What America can learn from one of the most sustainable food nations on Earth.

Via Seth Dixon
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Edelin Espino's curator insight, November 27, 2:34 PM

McDonalds broke in Quinoa Bolivia. A somewhat interesting news because McDonalds is a fast food restaurant quite famous and to break is pretty rare. But Bolivians prefer hamburgers that the Chachitas do and they also prefer to eat their daily diet than fast food. This place called Quinoa in Bolivia is a really interesting place free of McDonald.

Kaitlin Young's curator insight, December 12, 4:28 PM

Bolivia is one of the few countries where McDonalds failed, so Bolivia is obviously doing something right in regards to its food industry. Bolivians' love of traditional food coupled with the loyalty to street vendors and local businesses. Bolivia does not treat its food industries as a potential market, but instead many food transactions involve trade as opposed to currency. Laws conserving local food culture and the elimination of most foreign parties has allowed for a very effective food sovereignty. 

 

Many countries, especially the United States, could benefit from this "food sovereignty", where the local individuals are honored and protected while large corporations are kept an arm's length away. Not only does this boost local small scale economies, but it would decrease pollution and preserve food culture.   

Alyssa Dorr's curator insight, December 17, 12:00 AM

"A Country With No McDonalds". I read this and thought to myself, how bad can that be? McDonalds isn't exactly the best option for food. In Bolivia, McDonalds doesn't exist and hasn't for about a decade. Believe it or not, McDonalds couldn't survive in the mountainous area so they were forced to close down in 2002. In 2011, a documentary was made about how odd it was that Bolivia didn't have a McDonalds. The documentary tells us that one of the main reasons the fast food restaurant closed down was because Bolivians preferred their traditional food over fast food. The documentary also stated that Bolivians do love hamburgers, which are not traditional. However, they prefer to buy them from the many indigenous women hawking food on the streets. People line up for these hamburgers on the street, so its almost like their own form of McDonalds. Mostly, they prefer to buy from people they have a relationship with, typically from their own community.