Chronique d'un pays où il ne se passe rien... ou presque !
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Chronique d'un pays où il ne se passe rien... ou presque !
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Rescooped by Daniel Denninger from Geography Education
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49 Maps That Explain The U.S.

49 Maps That Explain The U.S. | Chronique d'un pays où il ne se passe rien... ou presque ! | Scoop.it

"49 Maps That Explain The U.S. For Dumb Foreigners--The United States is mind-boggling. Right?!"


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Matthew Richmond's curator insight, September 16, 2015 2:00 PM

Some of them are quite fascinating. Scooped from my professor.

Alex Vielman's curator insight, September 21, 2015 11:10 PM

It's to see these "maps" that "explain" the U.S. in almost a sarcastic matter. Americans are living in what researches call megaregions. After, doing our Map of the U.S. for an assignment, it becomes difficult to divide regions when one is so familiar with one area, in my case, New England. New England, or the Northeast, is considered a megaregion because there is high population density in this area. In the map that displays these megaregions, its interesting to see those areas that are emerging. For example, in the map it saids Cascadia is emegering which is the corner of the U.S., the state of Washington. 

Some people think that the U.S. population is spread throughout the whole map. Its interesting to actually realize that 47% of the U.S. has zero population. This was an awesome article thats loaded with fun interesting facts. 

Raymond Dolloff's curator insight, November 23, 2015 2:32 PM

Understanding the landscape of our Country is important. The way to best understand it is to look at maps, especially these maps, and get a hold on what the country looks like. From the height of exploration to seeing where the most trees are within the country. This map has a lot of information for anyone who has questions.

Rescooped by Daniel Denninger from Geography Education
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Walled World

Walled World | Chronique d'un pays où il ne se passe rien... ou presque ! | Scoop.it
We chart the routes of, and reasons for, the barriers which are once again dividing populations

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Lauren Sellers's curator insight, May 29, 2014 1:06 AM

We looked at this map in class its really interesting nd weird to see all the dividing walls in the world and to discover ones youve never seen before.

Tanya Townsend's curator insight, October 12, 2015 9:53 PM

The video attached to this article reminded me made me think "racism". It is not Americas first time targeting one cultural group and antagonizing them. We did it to the Indians, Jews, at one time we denied Chinese immigrants the right to enter the country or become a citizen. The projection of walls in my opinion only creates more room for crime. I would love to research what benefits its had. I think the world is lacking the understand that people are people .period. This segregation and division is so unnecessary and creates wars, tension, hostility, and divide.

 

Gene Gagne's curator insight, December 2, 2015 9:41 AM

the social impact is we do not get to mingle with people of different culture, religion, ethnicity. Economically businesses do not grow at least on the small business side. There is no chance of growth. what about population once again if you stay with in a section divided by walls then the population stays within. a society would have to stay above the 2.06 fertility rate to keep their population stable.

Rescooped by Daniel Denninger from Geography Education
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The Invasion of America

The Invasion of America | Chronique d'un pays où il ne se passe rien... ou presque ! | Scoop.it

This interactive map, produced by University of Georgia historian Claudio Saunt to accompany his new book West of the Revolution: An Uncommon History of 1776, offers a time-lapse vision of the transfer of Indian land between 1776 and 1887. As blue “Indian homelands” disappear, small red areas appear, indicating the establishment of reservations (above is a static image of the map; visit the map's page to play with its features).


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Seth Dixon's curator insight, June 18, 2014 11:13 AM

In the past I've shared maps that show the historic expansion of the United States--a temporal and spatial visualization of Manifest Destiny.  The difference with this interactive is that the narrative focuses on the declining territory controlled by Native Americans instead of the growth of the United States.  That may seem a minor detail, but how history is told shapes our perception of events, identities and places.

 

Tags: USA, historicalmapping, visualization

Courtney Barrowman's curator insight, June 23, 2014 12:25 PM

unit 1 Perception and bias of maps

Tom Cockburn's curator insight, June 24, 2014 5:51 AM

This will likely resonate with 'first peoples' everywhere