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A blood test to predict imminent death? Would you want to take it?

A blood test to predict imminent death? Would you want to take it? | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it
Here are some findings that could scare you to death: In a study published this week, Finnish and Estonian researchers report that they have identified specific levels of four chemicals circulating in the blood that offer a reliable signal that death is near. The four harbingers of death can be readily detected in a blood sample, and are even predictive when seen in apparently healthy people, their new study shows.

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Medical Powerpoint PPT Template: Theme Based Medical Templates - What Is It All About

Medical Powerpoint PPT Template: Theme Based Medical Templates - What Is It All About | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it

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Modèle médical Powerpoint PPT: thème Base de Modèles Médicaux - What Is It All About

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Therapeutic potentials of metals in ancient India: A review through Charaka Samhita

Therapeutic potentials of metals in ancient India: A review through Charaka Samhita | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it

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Potentiels Thérapeutiques des Métaux Dans L'Inde ancienne: Un Examen préalable by Charaka Samhita

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Arun Shrivastava's curator insight, March 2, 2014 3:47 AM

Eating silver and gold in minute doses has been part of both Indian and Semitic cultures. The use of metal gained popularity during India's Medieval period. The use of colloidal silver is well known in the west. We now have better understanding of health giving properties of silver.

James Collins and his team showed that when boosted with a small amount of silver the antibiotic drugs could kill between 10 and 1,000 times as many bacteria. The increased membrane permeability also allows more antibiotics to enter the bacterial cells, which may overwhelm the resistance mechanisms that rely on shuttling the drug back out. Here we have hard scientific evidence of synergistic power of silver.

However, I have not found any work which shows synergistic effect of turmeric [and other spices], which is a natural antibiotic, with silver. I think it is worth investigating.

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Luteolin is effective in the non-small-cell lung cancer model with L858R/T790M EGFR mutation and erlotinib resistance

Luteolin is effective in the non-small-cell lung cancer model with L858R/T790M EGFR mutation and erlotinib resistance | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it

Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is one of the most commonly diagnosed malignancies all over the world. The small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) including gefitinib and erlotinib have been used widely for treating NSCLC. Unfortunately, nearly all patients eventually progress by acquired resistance after experiencing marked improvement on these drugs. Because there is no effective therapeutic strategy to treat NSCLC with acquired resistance to EGFR TKIs, we mainly evaluated the effects of luteolin on T790M mutant NSCLC cells.

 

The effect of luteolin on the viability of NSCLC cell and normal cells lines was investigated using the Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK-8) assay. Luteolin-induced apoptosis was assessed by Bivariate FITC-Annexin V/ PI assay, and Western blot assay was used to test the apoptotic proteins. Co-immunoprecipitation was used to test the luteolin effect between Hsp90 and mutant EGFR. The effect of luteolin on the Akt/mTOR pathway was studied using Western blotting analysis, and the in vivo anti-tumour efficacy was examined in an xenograft model.

 

We found that luteolin exerted remarkable anti-tumorigenic effects on EGFR L858R/T790M mutation and erlotinib-resistant NSCLC both at cell and animal levels. Mechanistically, luteolin induced EGFR degradation through inhibiting the association of Hsp90 and mutant EGFR and therefore obviously prevented PI3K/AKT/mTOR signalling and led to NSCLC cell apoptosis.

 

Our investigation suggests that luteolin may act as a potential candidate for NSCLC therapy especially for treatment to acquired erlotinib-resistant NSCLC patients.

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More Evidence Shows Whooping Cough Evolving In Response To Its Vaccine.

More Evidence Shows Whooping Cough Evolving In Response To Its Vaccine. | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it

Whooping cough is evolving in response to its vaccine. Want proof? In a new study, researchers found 30 percent of whooping cough bacteria in Australia have evolved.

 

We've reported on the evolution of whooping cough before. Researchers have found evolved pertussis, as whooping cough is scientifically known, in Finland, France, Italy, Japan and the U.S. As we previously reported, the evolved bacteria don't seem to be more dangerous than their predecessors. Nevertheless, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention are keeping an eye on whooping cough's evolution. It could help explain another recent pertussis phenomenon: The newest pertussis vaccines seem to wear off much faster than older ones, leaving kids vulnerable at age 8 or 10 unless they get booster shots.

 

In Australia, researchers from several universities and hospitals examined samples of pertussis dating back to 1997. What they saw happening there mirrored what's happened in the U.S.


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aj Plus éléments probants, de la coqueluche évolution en réponse à ses vaccins. Votre point de vue externe de ...

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Association between pre-diagnostic circulating vitamin D concentration and risk of colorectal cancer in European populations:a nested case-control study

Association between pre-diagnostic circulating vitamin D concentration and risk of colorectal cancer in European populations:a nested case-control study | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it

Les résultats de cette étude, ce qui est le plus important pour la date et l'une de la première sur la base de populations européennes, montrent que, par rapport à une concentration de milieu de gamme de 50 à 75,0 nmol / l, 25 de circulation - (OH) D inférieure à 50,0 nmol / l sont associés à un risque accru de cancer colorectal. Bien que des niveaux plus élevés de 75,0 nmol / L ont été associés à un risque réduit de cancer colorectal, l'association n'était pas significative par rapport à la concentration de milieu de gamme. Les analyses par quintile de 25 - (OH) D concentration, ont montré une diminution dose-réponse du risque de cancer colorectal avec l'augmentation de 25 - (OH) D concentration. Les participants du quintile supérieur ont un risque important de 40% plus faible de cancer colorectal, que ceux du quintile inférieur. En outre, une plus grande consommation de calcium alimentaire, mais non alimentaire en vitamine D, a été trouvée être associée à un risque réduit de cancer colorectal.

 

Depuis la première suggestion que la vitamine D pourrait avoir un rôle dans le risque de cancer colorectal, l'association a été évaluée pré-diagnostic en seulement quelques petits studies.Most de ces études ont montré des associations inverses avec le risque de cancer colorectal, mais les résultats ont été principalement basé sur les populations d'Amérique du Nord avec des habitudes alimentaires différentes et le mode de vie que leurs homologues d'Europe occidentale. Les associations inverses forts de la présente étude suggèrent que des efforts de recherche devraient se concentrer moins sur les résultats d'observation et de plus sur des études cliniques pertinentes pour déterminer si la vitamine D a un rôle causal dans la prévention du cancer colorectal ou si elle est un marqueur d'autres événements.

 

Une considération importante pour faire circuler 25 - (OH) D est ce que la concentration doit être considérée comme suffisante pour protection contre le cancer colorectal. Les résultats d'une étude récente méta-analyse, qui comprenait environ la moitié autant de cas que dans notre étude suggèrent qu'un taux de 25 - (OH) D d'environ 80,0 nmol / l conduit à une réduction du risque de cancer colorectal d'environ 50%


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New Asthma Therapy May Permanently Relieve Asthma Symptoms

New Asthma Therapy May Permanently Relieve Asthma Symptoms | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it
25 millions d'Américains vivent avec l'asthme et pour 10% d'entre eux, les corticostéroïdes inhalés et bêta-agonistes ne sont pas des médicaments assez forts pour les garder hors de l'hôpital, un article dans les rapports Tirs de blog de NPR. Mais en 2010, la FDA a approuvé une nouvelle procédure, appelée bronchique ...

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New Asthma Therapy May Permanently Relieve Asthma Symptoms

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Methylseleninic Acid Suppresses Pancreatic Cancer Growth Involving Multiple Pathways

Methylseleninic Acid Suppresses Pancreatic Cancer Growth Involving Multiple Pathways | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it

As a potential novel agent for treating pancreatic cancer, methylseleninic acid (MSeA) was evaluated in cell culture and xenograft models. Results showed that MSeA induced G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a majority of human and mouse pancreatic cancer cell lines, but G2 arrest in human PANC-1 and PANC-28 cell lines. In contrast to our previous finding in human prostate cancer LNCaP cells having a lack of P53 activation by MSeA, induction of G2 arrest in PANC-1 cells was accompanied by increased mutant P53 Ser15 phosphorylation, upregulation of P53-targets P21Cip1 and GADD45 and G2 checkpoint kinase (Chk2) activation, suggestive of DNA damage responses. A rapid inhibition of AKT phosphorylation was followed by reduced mTOR signaling and increased autophagy in PANC-1 cells attenuating caspase-mediated apoptosis execution. Furthermore, daily oral treatment with MSeA (3 mg Se/kg body weight) significantly suppressed growth of subcutaneously inoculated PANC-1 xenograft in SCID mice. Immunohistochemical analyses detected increased p-Ser15 P53, P21Cip1, pS139-H2AX (DNA damage responses), and caspase-3 cleavage and decreased pSer473AKT and Ki67 proliferative index and reduced intratumor vascular density in MSeA-treated xenograft. These results provide impetus for further research of MSeA in the therapy and/or chemoprevention of pancreatic cancer.


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Methylseleninic Acid Suppresses Pancreatic Cancer Growth Involving Multiple Pathways

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Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's curator insight, February 5, 2014 4:02 PM

Methylseleninic Acid Suppresses Pancreatic Cancer Growth Involving Multiple Pathways

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WHO: Cancer cases tipped to rise 57% in 20 years in imminent 'human disaster'

WHO: Cancer cases tipped to rise 57% in 20 years in imminent 'human disaster' | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it
Cancer cases are expected to surge by 70% worldwide in the next 20 years, an imminent "human disaster," according to the World Health Organization.

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WHO: Cancer cases tipped to rise 57% in 20 years in imminent 'human disaster'

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Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's curator insight, February 5, 2014 4:00 PM

WHO: Cancer cases tipped to rise 57% in 20 years in imminent 'human disaster'

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Simple, At-Home Test Will Detect Most Colorectal Cancers

Simple, At-Home Test Will Detect Most Colorectal Cancers | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it
News, Views and Moves from Kaiser Permanente
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Simple, At-Home Test Will Detect Most Colorectal Cancers

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Apple flavonoids inhibit growth of HT29 human colon cancer cells and modulate expression of genes involved in the biotransformation of xenobiotics

Apple flavonoids inhibit growth of HT29 human colon cancer cells and modulate expression of genes involved in the biotransformation of xenobiotics | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it

Flavonoids from fruits and vegetables probably reduce risks of diseases associated with oxidative stress, including cancer. Apples contain significant amounts of flavonoids with antioxidative potential. The objectives of this study were to investigate such compounds for properties associated with reduction of cancer risks. We report herein that apple flavonoids from an apple extract (AE) inhibit colon cancer cell growth and significantly modulate expression of genes related to xenobiotic metabolism. HT29 cells were treated with AE at concentrations delivering 5–50 µM of one of the major ingredients, phloridzin (“phloridzin-equivalents,” Ph.E), to the cell culture medium, with a synthetic flavonoid mixture mimicking the composition of the AE or with 5–100 µM individual flavonoids. HT29 cell growth was inhibited by the complex extract and by the mixture. HT29 cells were treated with nontoxic doses of the AE (30 µM, Ph.E) and after 24 h total RNA was isolated to elucidate patterns of gene expression using a human cDNA-microarray (SuperArray®) spotted with 96 genes of drug metabolism. Treatment with AE resulted in an upregulation of several genes (GSTP1, GSSTT2, MGST2, CYCP4F3, CHST5, CHST6, and CHST7) and downregulation of EPHX1, in comparison to the medium controls. The enhanced transcriptional activity of GSTP1 and GSTT2 genes was confirmed with real-time qRT-PCR. On the basis of the pattern of differential gene expression found here, we conclude that apple flavonoids modulate toxicological defense against colon cancer risk factors. In addition to the inhibition of tumor cell proliferation, this could be a mechanism of cancer risk reduction


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WHO: Cancer cases tipped to rise 57% in 20 years in imminent 'human disaster'

WHO: Cancer cases tipped to rise 57% in 20 years in imminent 'human disaster' | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it
Cancer cases are expected to surge by 70% worldwide in the next 20 years, an imminent "human disaster," according to the World Health Organization.

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WHO: Cancer cases tipped to rise 57% in 20 years in imminent 'human disaster'

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Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's curator insight, February 9, 2014 9:39 AM

WHO: Cancer cases tipped to rise 57% in 20 years in imminent 'human disaster'

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Ultraweak Photon Emission as a Non-Invasive Health Assessment: A Systematic Review

Ultraweak Photon Emission as a Non-Invasive Health Assessment: A Systematic Review | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it

We conducted a systematic review (SR) of the peer reviewed scientific literature on ultraweak photon emissions (UPE) from humans. The question was: Can ultraweak photon emissions from humans be used as a non-invasive health assessment? A systematic search was conducted across eight relevant databases: PubMed/MEDLINE, BIOSIS, CINAHL, PSYCHINFO, All of Cochrane EBM databases, GIDEON, DoD Biomedical Research, and clinicaltrials.gov from database inception to October 2011. Of the 1315 studies captured by the search strategy, 56 met the inclusion criteria, out of which 1 was a RCT, 27 were CCT, and 28 were observational and descriptive studies. There were no systematic reviews/meta-analyses that fit the inclusion criteria. In this report, the authors provide an assessment of the quality of the RCT included; describe the characteristics of all the included studies, the outcomes assessed, and the effectiveness of photon emission as a potential health assessment tool. This report demonstrates that the peer reviewed literature on UPE and human UPE measurement in particular is surprisingly large. Most of the human UPE literature is of good to high quality based on our systematic evaluation. However, an evaluation tool for systematically evaluating this type of “bio-evaluation” methodology is not currently available and would be worth developing. Publications in the peer reviewed literature over the last 50 years demonstrate that the use of “off-the-shelf” technologies and well described methodologies for the detection of human photon emissions are being used on a regular basis in medical and research settings. The overall quality of this literature is good and the use of this approach for determining inflammatory and oxidative states of patients indicate the growing use and value of this approach as both a medical and research tool.


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The real promise of big data: It's changing the whole way humans will solve ... - VentureBeat

The real promise of big data: It's changing the whole way humans will solve ... - VentureBeat | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it
The real promise of big data: It's changing the whole way humans will solve ...
VentureBeat
The re-emergence of BioTech, or BioTech 2.0, is a great example of innovation in automating procedures on top of newly procured datasets.

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La véritable promesse de grande données: Il change tout le façon dont les humains se résoudre ... - VentureBeat points AJOUTER de Votre de vue ...

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Erin Smith's curator insight, February 17, 2014 3:27 AM

Fascinating piece on the impact big data will have on all fields of science, medtech included. The legal dichotomy is that in medtech we are dealing with very sensitive, personal data, and European data protection/privacy legislation at the moment may act to preserve individual rights at the expense of scientific progress...

Erin Smith's curator insight, February 17, 2014 3:32 AM

Fascinating piece on the impact big data will have on all fields of science, medtech included. The legal dichotomy is that in medtech we are dealing with very sensitive, personal data, and European data protection/privacy legislation at the moment may act to preserve individual rights at the expense of scientific progress...

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Scientists discover new protein involved in lung cancer

Scientists discover new protein involved in lung cancer | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it
Des scientifiques de l'Université de Manchester - partie du Centre de recherche du cancer Manchester (CRF) - ont découvert une nouvelle protéine qui est impliquée dans le cancer et l'inflammation dans le tissu pulmonaire.

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Digital media could work as tool to improve health

Digital media could work as tool to improve health | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it
NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - After a desperate mother in South Wales, UK, posted a video of her baby having a seizure on Facebook, one of her friends provided the diagnosis that had eluded the boy's doctor.The

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The Emerging Role of MicroRNAs in the Regulation of Gene Expression by Nutrients.

The Emerging Role of MicroRNAs in the Regulation of Gene Expression by Nutrients. | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of evolutionarily conserved, small non-coding RNAs of 19-24 nucleotides in length that regulate gene expression mostly at the posttranscriptional level. They are known to be involved in the control of different processes such as cell cycling, programmed cell death, cell differentiation, tumor development, metastasis, and sensing of nutrient stress. This review summarizes the evidence regarding the changes in miRNA expression that are caused by diets with a deficiency or augmented intake of nutrients such as amino acids, carbohydrates, fatty acids, vitamins, and phytochemicals. As diet is known to influence the expression of miRNAs, miRNA profiling has the potential to be useful in the assessment of nutritional status in dietary intervention studies. Additionally, as it can change miRNA expression, diet may be used as a therapeutic agent to treat many different diseases. Also, we explored here some ideas on therapeutics based on the manipulation of miRNA expression levels for dietary-derived diseases as well as the putative effect of food-derived miRNAs on host gene expression.


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The Emerging Role of MicroRNAs in the Regulation of Gene Expression by Nutrients

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Living With Cancer: An Artist's View

Living With Cancer: An Artist's View | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it
The cancer paintings of the Canadian artist Robert Pope remind us that the disease, as well as the effort to treat it, can take a toll on the human spirit.

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MyHealthShare's curator insight, February 11, 2014 7:28 AM

Living With Cancer: An Artist's View | http://myhealthshare.org @scoopit http://sco.lt/...@nytimeswell @hodgkinlymphoma @myhealthshare

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Cannabinoids Induce Apoptosis of Pancreatic Tumor Cells via Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress–Related Genes

Pancreatic adenocarcinomas are among the most malignant forms of cancer and, therefore, it is of especial interest to set new strategies aimed at improving the prognostic of this deadly disease. The present study was undertaken to investigate the action of cannabinoids, a new family of potential antitumoral agents, in pancreatic cancer. We show that cannabinoid receptors are expressed in human pancreatic tumor cell lines and tumor biopsies at much higher levels than in normal pancreatic tissue. Studies conducted with MiaPaCa2 and Panc1 cell lines showed that cannabinoid administration (a) induced apoptosis, (b) increased ceramide levels, and (c) up-regulated mRNA levels of the stress protein p8. These effects were prevented by blockade of the CB2 cannabinoid receptor or by pharmacologic inhibition of ceramide synthesis de novo. Knockdown experiments using selective small interfering RNAs showed the involvement of p8 via its downstream endoplasmic reticulum stress–related targets activating transcription factor 4 (ATF-4) and TRB3 in Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol–induced apoptosis. Cannabinoids also reduced the growth of tumor cells in two animal models of pancreatic cancer. In addition, cannabinoid treatment inhibited the spreading of pancreatic tumor cells. Moreover, cannabinoid administration selectively increased apoptosis and TRB3 expression in pancreatic tumor cells but not in normal tissue. In conclusion, results presented here show that cannabinoids lead to apoptosis of pancreatic tumor cells via a CB2 receptor and de novo synthesized ceramide-dependent up-regulation of p8 and the endoplasmic reticulum stress–related genes ATF-4 and TRB3. These findings may contribute to set the basis for a new therapeutic approach for the treatment of pancreatic cancer.


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Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's curator insight, February 5, 2014 3:57 PM

Cannabinoids Induce Apoptosis of Pancreatic Tumor Cells via Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress–Related Genes

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Removing a suture: What the future may bring

Removing a suture: What the future may bring | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it
It is a spring morning in July 2047. Jenny, a nursing assistant, emerges from an exam room and gently closes the door.

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MyHealthShare's curator insight, February 10, 2014 7:28 AM

Removing a suture: What the future may bring | http://myhealthshare.org @scoopit http://sco.lt/...@myhealthshare @kevinmd

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New guidelines aim to help women prevent stroke

New guidelines aim to help women prevent stroke | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it
The first-ever guidelines for preventing stroke in women don't fool around. They offer ways to prevent this disabling and potentially deadly event from adolescence to old age. More than half of the 800,000 Americans who have strokes each year are women. Nearly 4 million American women are living with the aftermath of a stroke. And because women live longer than men, their lifetime risk of having a stroke is higher. Those numbers are why stroke prevention is especially important for women. The guidelines cover the use of oral contraceptives, high blood pressure during pregnancy, the use of hormones after menopause, and migraine with aura. They also cover the fundamentals of stroke prevention, like controlling blood pressure, exercising more, eating a healthy diet, and not smoking.

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New guidelines aim to help women prevent stroke

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MyHealthShare's curator insight, February 8, 2014 8:53 AM

New guidelines aim to help women prevent stroke | http://myhealthshare.org @scoopit http://sco.lt/...@myhealthshare @harvardhealth

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Dietary Supplements: Harmful or Essential? Cutting Through the Unrelenting Rhetoric

Dietary Supplements: Harmful or Essential? Cutting Through the Unrelenting Rhetoric | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it

What a firestorm! Ever since Dr. Paul Offit's book, "Do you Believe in Magic: The Sense and Nonsense of Alternative Medicine" was released last summer, there's been a burst of new negative dietary supplement study results and position papers. Editorials, featuring provocative headlines such as: Enough is Enough: Stop Wasting Money on Vitamin and Mineral Supplements and Don't Take Your Vitamins, have been published in prominent medical journals and major media outlets, many authored or co-authored by the omnipresent Offit, himself.

 

In response to the loud and growing chorus of conventional and academic physicians opposing dietary supplementation, The Council for Responsible Nutrition, Natural Products Association and Life Extension Foundation have released their own statements.

 

This article attempts to break through the din and unremitting confusion sown by the media whir around dietary supplements, the industry that champions their use and public health in general.

 

First, a few disclosures: FON Therapeutics currently consults and collaborates with several nutraceutical companies. I also admit to personally ingesting a significant amount of supplements ever since working at a mom and pop health food store in 1980, and in even greater quantities when diagnosed with 'incurable' leukemia in 1991.

Can I objectively write on this topic? You be the judge.

 

My success achieving complete remission of chronic lymphocytic leukemia without traditional intervention and using quality nutraceuticals as part of a comprehensive, personalized integrative cancer therapy regimen has been well-documented by my oncologist, Lee Nadler, MD, a Harvard Medical School dean and one of the World's largest NIH funded investigators for cancer and HIV/AIDS.


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Dietary Supplements: Harmful or Essential? Cutting Through the Unrelenting Rhetoric

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Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's curator insight, February 2, 2014 4:14 AM

Dietary Supplements: Harmful or Essential? Cutting Through the Unrelenting Rhetoric

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Could electronically controlled drugs reduce side effects?

Could electronically controlled drugs reduce side effects? | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it

Researchers say they can zap implants with electrical currents to release specific amounts of medication to targeted areas of the body.


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Could electronically controlled drugs

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Methylseleninic Acid Suppresses Pancreatic Cancer Growth Involving Multiple Pathways

Methylseleninic Acid Suppresses Pancreatic Cancer Growth Involving Multiple Pathways | Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's medical review | Scoop.it

As a potential novel agent for treating pancreatic cancer, methylseleninic acid (MSeA) was evaluated in cell culture and xenograft models. Results showed that MSeA induced G1 cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a majority of human and mouse pancreatic cancer cell lines, but G2 arrest in human PANC-1 and PANC-28 cell lines. In contrast to our previous finding in human prostate cancer LNCaP cells having a lack of P53 activation by MSeA, induction of G2 arrest in PANC-1 cells was accompanied by increased mutant P53 Ser15 phosphorylation, upregulation of P53-targets P21Cip1 and GADD45 and G2 checkpoint kinase (Chk2) activation, suggestive of DNA damage responses. A rapid inhibition of AKT phosphorylation was followed by reduced mTOR signaling and increased autophagy in PANC-1 cells attenuating caspase-mediated apoptosis execution. Furthermore, daily oral treatment with MSeA (3 mg Se/kg body weight) significantly suppressed growth of subcutaneously inoculated PANC-1 xenograft in SCID mice. Immunohistochemical analyses detected increased p-Ser15 P53, P21Cip1, pS139-H2AX (DNA damage responses), and caspase-3 cleavage and decreased pSer473AKT and Ki67 proliferative index and reduced intratumor vascular density in MSeA-treated xenograft. These results provide impetus for further research of MSeA in the therapy and/or chemoprevention of pancreatic cancer.


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Methylseleninic Acid Suppresses Pancreatic Cancer Growth Involving Multiple Pathways

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Christian Yamashiba Kasongo's curator insight, February 9, 2014 9:41 AM

Methylseleninic Acid Suppresses Pancreatic Cancer Growth Involving Multiple Pathways