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Becoming Geographers

Becoming Geographers | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
An interview with prolific geographer Dr. Charles Gritzner, who provides his advice on the discipline of geography.
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If 3 Little Girls Did This To My House, I'd Do Everything I Could To Get Them Full Rides To Stanford

If 3 Little Girls Did This To My House, I'd Do Everything I Could To Get Them Full Rides To Stanford | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Tired of ads playing to the worst stereotypes of girls? Have I got the three little geniuses for you.
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Snow Headed for the Northwest, Including Portland; Significant Rain Expected in California - weather.com Western Storm Concerns

Snow Headed for the Northwest, Including Portland; Significant Rain Expected in California - weather.com Western Storm Concerns | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
After a dry winter so far, an atmospheric pattern will set up that will allow rain and snow to return to the parched western states.
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Undiscovered Possibilities - Google Earth

"While Germans tend to talk about privacy and how the internet takes away our freedom, chief Almir of the Surui tribe in Brazil came up with an idea when he first came in contact with Google Earth. He saw it as a great tool to visualize the devastation of the rainforest. With the help of Google providing the knowledge and equipment he started the project and provided an unfiltered perspective never seen before. This is a growing project on a growing problem that should matter to all of us. It’s never a service or product itself that matters; it’s what you do with it. Check the video and see for yourself."

Globalization inherently brings serendipitous juxtapositions. In this clip we see the merger of geospatial technologies to protect indigenous cultures and their cultural ecology.


Via Seth Dixon
chris tobin's insight:

this will help protect the forest and decrease deforestation hopefully, also protecting global climate and environment.   How does this affect the large companies in paper mills, timber and especially the specialty tree plantations.........roads cutting through the rainforest ......wildlife........

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 23, 4:33 PM

Globalization makes amazing hybrid cultures. 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, January 23, 4:35 PM

Globalization

 

This video shows a positive side of globalization.  The use of first world technology in the third world to stop illegal foresting is a great example of the positive effects of globalization.  When people talk about globalization it is usually in negative terms, the damage it does to the environment and cultures.  Globalization can be a force for good but it has just as often been a force of destruction and dislocation.  Globalization in itself is a neutral force it is the way it is used that created a positive or negative impact.  Globalization has been occurring since the 1500 when European traders began trading with the Arab and the Asian regions.  The swapping of languages and cultural ideas has been going on for as long.  Today the speed of globalization is what many people are worried about.  In the past it was slower and more controlled, today with instant communications the changes are rapid and chaotic.  This can be scary and disturbing.  The way people in developing countries deal with these changes are not that much different form how the developed world dealt with the same or similar changes 100 years ago.  The world today is watching and so the developing countries are more visible in their industrialization and labor problems then the developed countries were when they went through the same processes.  The end result of Globalization is anyone’s guess but there is no denying that it has changed the world we live in.

Amy Marques's curator insight, January 29, 8:03 PM

This is a great example that shows the positive and negative effects of globalization. The negative effects is that the chief Almir and the Surui tribe have changed from their original roots through contact with the outside world. Their language and clothing has been altered because we see the cheif speaking brazilian portugese and the tribe wearing western clothing. The positive aspect is that they are trying to protect their ancient rain forests by using the benefits of globalization. I think its great that Google is helping this tribe, of course Google is getting tons of recognition for this, but they are doing wonders for this group of people. With the technology provided the tribe will be able to be put on the map and educate its group.

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On The Plains, The Rush For Oil Has Changed Everything

On The Plains, The Rush For Oil Has Changed Everything | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Black gold has brought big-money jobs and severe growing pains to once-sleepy North Dakota towns.

 

A remarkable transformation is underway in western North Dakota, where an oil boom is changing the state's fortunes and leaving once-sleepy towns bursting at the seams. In a series of stories, NPR is exploring the economic, social and environmental demands of this modern-day gold rush.


Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks
chris tobin's insight:

http://www.propublica.org/article/the-other-fracking-north-dakotas-oil-boom-brings-damage-along-with-prosperi                 ;

 

  Visit this website for some good information..................

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Diane Johnson's curator insight, February 4, 11:06 AM

Provides useful insights for discussing energy needs and the myriad of impacts for consideration.

chris tobin's comment, February 6, 7:46 AM
http://www.propublica.org/article/the-other-fracking-north-dakotas-oil-boom-brings-damage-along-with-prosperi Also visit this website on some good information.......
Tracy Galvin's curator insight, April 26, 1:10 PM

The state of North Dakota has been a very low population remote state until recently. Large influx of people into these towns is causing more problems than they can handle and may just destroy the state. Once the work opportunities run out everyone will leave, but by then all the current towns will have been changed, maybe to the point where they couldn't recover.

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Ancient Native American site could stymie Miami high-rise developers

Ancient Native American site could stymie Miami high-rise developers | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
MIAMI, Feb 4 (Reuters) - The unearthing of the remains of a 2,000-year-oldNative American village where downtown Miami meets Biscayne Bay has thrown awrench into a multibillion-dollar development project

Via Sylvain Rotillon
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The carbon map: making sense of climate change responsibility and vulnerability

The carbon map: making sense of climate change responsibility and vulnerability | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it

 

http://www.theguardian.com/news/datablog/interactive/2012/mar/29/carbon-map-infographic-world

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When You Look Closely At These 10 Photos, You'll See Why They Mean So Much.

When You Look Closely At These 10 Photos, You'll See Why They Mean So Much. | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
We all age, but not everyone gets a chance to do something like this.
chris tobin's insight:

great photos and stories........please visit this site  Thanks!

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Why So Many Icelanders Still Believe in Invisible Elves

Why So Many Icelanders Still Believe in Invisible Elves | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
How the country’s history and geography created the perfect setting for magical creatures, whose perceived existence sparks environmental protests to this day. 

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 30, 2013 6:32 AM

I was discussing the Norwegian tradition of trolls and fantastical creatures with a friend who lived there for a few years.  She said that she doesn't believe in trolls when she's in the United States, but "when you are in those mountains with the rocks and trees, how can you not imagine that they might exist?" 

AJ A. Gildner's curator insight, December 12, 2013 7:01 PM

In my AP Human Geography class, we have discussed the varying factors beween cultures.  I think this is one of the most interesting factors because it also adds to the history and foundation of a culture.  Personally, I would like to know the reasons, for believing or disbelieving in this existence of "elves", from locals.  This belief could cause much grief for construction of the island in the future.  However, I do not believe this a big problem, because I'm sure that many people around the world would be interested in these stories (I know I am).  Someday, when I go to Iceland, I will remember this article and surely will try and seek out these fantastic creatures.  

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10 Terrifying Bridges You Need to See to Believe

10 Terrifying Bridges You Need to See to Believe | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
If you suffer from gephyrophobia (fear of bridges), click away now. From bridges so frightening that people will pay someone else to drive their car across to bridges that are just plain dangerous, these 10 bridges are the world's scariest....
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Can you guess the dirt-cheap city? - MSN Real Estate

Can you guess the dirt-cheap city? - MSN Real Estate | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
These 15 areas are among the nation's most affordable — see whether you can name each.
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The Fest For Beatles Fans

The Fest For Beatles Fans | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
The Fest For Beatles Fans is a gathering of thousands of Beatles fans from all over the world to...
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John Lennon's music is still the world's inspiriation

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Where Poor and Uninsured Americans Live

Where Poor and Uninsured Americans Live | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
The 26 Republican-dominated states not participating in an expansion of Medicaid are home to a disproportionate share of the nation’s poorest uninsured residents. Eight million will be stranded without insurance.

Via Bonnie Bracey Sutton, Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks
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Bonnie Bracey Sutton's curator insight, October 6, 2013 12:14 PM

Technology can help us understand who is covered!

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These two maps are incredibly important to Obamacare

These two maps are incredibly important to Obamacare | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it

If you want to understand where Obamacare stands to have the most significant impact, check out these new maps from the Census. They show uninsured levels for every county in the United States, broken down by income level. The top map shows the population that is likely to qualify for Medicaid coverage, if they live in a state that is expanding that program. The bottom map captures the Medicaid-eligible population and those who may qualify for subsidies to purchase health insurance in the new marketplaces.There are two things that these maps tell me. First, they underscore the significant impact that state policy will have on the Affordable Care Act. Texas and Florida have both decided not to participate in the Medicaid expansion, concerned about the financial implications of expanding an entitlement program. Those are states that tend to have a higher uninsured rate that will see them dip less than was initially expected under the health law.Second, these maps explain why you see a group like Enroll America focusing its work on 10 states, rather than sweeping out across the country. There are some areas of the United States, like the upper Midwest and the Northeast, that already have a relatively low uninsured rate. That likely explains why you see national groups focusing on a smaller area where they can likely have a larger impact, the places where uninsured rates for the poor hover as high as 40 percent."


Via Seth Dixon
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Rigs Map | northdakotarigsmap.com

http://northdakotarigsmap.com/#sthash.0R955q9W.0B0ciIw5.dpbs

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http://northdakotarigsmap.com/#sthash.0R955q9W.0B0ciIw5.dpbs

 

See this site for great maps on rigs and oildrilling sites North Dakota

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Germany Adds Lessons in Islam to Better Blend Its Melting Pot

Germany Adds Lessons in Islam to Better Blend Its Melting Pot | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Public schools for the first time are offering classes in Islam to primary school students to better integrate Germany’s large Muslim minority and to try to counter the influence of radical religious thinking.

Via Seth Dixon
chris tobin's insight:

Many countries, including the U.S. has a Melting Pot of culture and I believe this cultivates better understanding and integration process

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Jamison DuClos's curator insight, January 10, 7:29 AM

This applies to culture.  Public schools for the first time are offering classes in Islam to help the Muslim minority and get rid of the radical religious thinking.  This could change other countries and cause them to do the same thing.  This can cause this country to dispose of its radical religious religious thinking with the next generation.  This can get rid of violence and other racial hates in Germany.

Sarah Ziolkowski's curator insight, January 16, 11:51 AM

This article applies to our unit of cultural differences in religion.The article talks about how these new classes in Hesse, Germany could lower radical religious thinking. This not only helps educate muslim children so their thinking doesn't become radical, but also educates the country to accept islam and not outcast those with that relgion. This could become a reality in your hometown if proved successful. In the future we can hope to see more tolerance and acceptance in the islamic faith and also tolerance for islamics in countries like Germany or maybe even The US.

Isabelle Zahn's curator insight, January 18, 11:48 AM

This article relates to our topic of religion and it  also relates to values and  globalization. In this article it talks about a school in Germany creating  classes in  Islam so that other people can understand them. Imagine how teachers had to go through so much more training just so that they were able to teach these new classes. This is helping to integrate Germany's  large Muslim minority and to trying to  counter the influence of radical religious thinking. This is the first time the public schools are offering classes in Islam. This has relevance and international communities because people also speak Islam and this isn't the only country that is starting to recognize it and wants to change this and create new classes for them so that they can be like everybody else. Some short-term effects could be other schools catching on and creating class is just for the Islam. Some long-term effects it could be every school having classes especially for the muslim kids. I'm also another long-term effect could be teachers having to learn Islam so that they do have the background to teach these kids if they ever were to come through their system. 

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Did You Know It Doesn’t Actually Snow in Subtropical Sochi? | TIME.com

Did You Know It Doesn’t Actually Snow in Subtropical Sochi? | TIME.com | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Here are some other disheartening facts about the upcoming Winter Olympics

 

Russia will host the 2014 Winter Olympics in the balmy seaside city of Sochi. And with more than $50 billion spent on them, they will be the most expensive Olympics ever. With the opening ceremony just under three weeks away, here’s a quick rundown on the Florida of Russia.


Via Seth Dixon
chris tobin's insight:

Here are some quotations from the article:

 

"A 37-hour train ride from Moscow, it’s located in Russia’s Deep South, on the  Black Sea, and boasts palm trees, pebble beaches and sulfur hot springs..."    ". . .   710,000 cu m of  snow taken from the mountains last winter and kept in storage."

". . . close proximity to the restive North Caucasus region, where bitter insurgencies  in Chechnya and the republics of Dagestan and Ingushetia have led to armed  rebellion and terrorist attacks in the Russian interior."

 

"According to Reuters, the Winter Games in Sochi will coincide with the 150th  anniversary of the expulsion of Muslim Circassians from the Black Sea coast that  resulted in the estimated deaths of 1.5 million people. Circassians living in  the U.S. have staged  demonstrations to protest the International Olympic Committee’s decision to  host the games in Sochi."

 

"With less than three weeks to go until the opening ceremony of the Winter Games  commences, there are still 300,000 tickets still available."

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Cam E's curator insight, February 18, 8:44 AM

I was aware of the fact it didn't snow in Sochi, but it really makes me wonder why that location was chosen, especially since it's so close to the conflict zone in the Northern Caucus mountains. One would imagine that Russia would have locations better suited for the winter games.

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Oil Pirates and the Mystery Ship

Oil Pirates and the Mystery Ship | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it

"Forget Somalia, the world's new epicenter of piracy is on the other side of Africa."

 

Some experts believe that the uptick in the number and geographical reach of pirate attacks is due in part precisely to the 2009 government amnesty for the Nigerian militants in the Niger Delta who had justified their attacks on oil infrastructure and their widespread theft of crude oil as a political protest. "With the political pretense lost, there is no longer any need for oil thieves to limit themselves to targets in the Delta," a United Nations study said.


Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks
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Shiva Prakash's curator insight, February 3, 8:20 PM

Technology is changing the shopping habits of buyers. Compete recently conducted a survey that reported a rapid increase in the number of people using their mobile devices for shopping Online shopping which u can buy from home easily with lots of designs of cloths and new technology mobile phones without going out for shopping just click here to go eaZy http://shopdeer.blogspot.in/

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, March 19, 7:08 AM

This article points to the little known problem of piracy off the western coast of Africa.  When one thinks of African piracy, one thinks of the Somali pirates it is important to know that piracy is not just limited to eastern Africa.

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NC river turns to gray sludge after coal ash spill

NC river turns to gray sludge after coal ash spill | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Duke Energy estimates that up to 82,000 tons of ash has been released from a break in a 48-inch storm water pipe at the Dan River Power Plant in Eden N.C. on Sunday.
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Climate Change 2013 Working Group I: The Physical Science Basis

The IPCC has produced a video on its Fifth Assessment Report (AR5). The first part on the Working Group I contribution to AR5 is now available. The other par...
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A Photographer Persuades Strangers To Do Something Really Odd, And They Totally Love It

A Photographer Persuades Strangers To Do Something Really Odd, And They Totally Love It | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
At a time when people seem addicted to their phones, this kind of connection is totally unexpected.
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2013 Geography Awareness Week

2013 Geography Awareness Week | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Geography Awareness Week is right around the corner (Nov. 18-22)!  The Theme is GEOGRAPHY AND THE NEW AGE OF EXPLORATION.  Here are some resources that you can use in your own classroom, in your ho...
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Salem Witch Trials Podcast

Salem Witch Trials Podcast | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 19, 2013 12:02 PM

With Halloween right around the corner, the Salem Witch trials loom large in the collective American psyche.  While many emphasize the supernatural and the scandalous, this Maps 101 podcast (based on the article written by Julie Dixon and yours truly) gives the geographic and historic context to understand the tragedy of the 1692 witch trials.


Tags: seasonal, historical, colonialism.

Mohamed Maktoub's curator insight, October 21, 2013 3:20 AM

لوحة  عظيمة  مثل صاحبها 

Justin McCullough's curator insight, October 21, 2013 10:37 AM

The outbreak of the Salem Witch Trials really are really something that produces many questions. Perhaps the most obvious question is why did these trials happen all of a sudden? A community largely based off of agriculture produces an atmosphere of superstition. This can be seen in the events that led up to the Salem witch trials. With the land barely producing enough to sustain the town, people look for a scapegoat to blame. Neighbors turned on neighbors in order to obtain more land claiming that each other were witches. It is interesting to see that in a time of crisis one can a helping hand is not always the popular choice; as seen in the Salem Witch Trials the opposite extreme is taken place. 

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Real Estate videos: News, features and advice - MSN Real Estate HIGH RISE BUILDING IN NYC HAS SEPARATE ENTRANCE FOR LOW INCOME TENANTS

Real Estate videos: News, features and advice - MSN Real Estate   HIGH RISE BUILDING IN NYC HAS SEPARATE ENTRANCE FOR LOW INCOME TENANTS | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Watch the latest real estate videos on news covering the housing market, mortgage rates, foreclosures and more.
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AMBER Alert System Disabled, Michelle Obama’s Website Still Running

AMBER Alert System Disabled, Michelle Obama’s Website Still Running | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
CLICK the image to read the story on AmericanOverlook.com
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AmberAlert was restored

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Life in a Toxic Country

Life in a Toxic Country | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
My wife and I worry about how China’s bad air and food will affect our child.

.....

Every morning, when I roll out of bed, I check an app on my cellphone that tells me the air quality index as measured by the United States Embassy, whose monitoring device is near my home. I want to see whether I need to turn on the purifiers and whether my wife and I can take our daughter outside.

Most days, she ends up housebound. Statistics released Wednesday by the Ministry of Environmental Protection revealed that air quality in Beijing was deemed unsafe for more than 60 percent of the days in the first half of 2013.


Via Seth Dixon
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