Chris' Regional Geography
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Undiscovered Possibilities - Google Earth

"While Germans tend to talk about privacy and how the internet takes away our freedom, chief Almir of the Surui tribe in Brazil came up with an idea when he first came in contact with Google Earth. He saw it as a great tool to visualize the devastation of the rainforest. With the help of Google providing the knowledge and equipment he started the project and provided an unfiltered perspective never seen before. This is a growing project on a growing problem that should matter to all of us. It’s never a service or product itself that matters; it’s what you do with it. Check the video and see for yourself."

Globalization inherently brings serendipitous juxtapositions. In this clip we see the merger of geospatial technologies to protect indigenous cultures and their cultural ecology.


Via Seth Dixon
chris tobin's insight:

this will help protect the forest and decrease deforestation hopefully, also protecting global climate and environment.   How does this affect the large companies in paper mills, timber and especially the specialty tree plantations.........roads cutting through the rainforest ......wildlife........

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, January 23, 2014 7:35 PM

Globalization

 

This video shows a positive side of globalization.  The use of first world technology in the third world to stop illegal foresting is a great example of the positive effects of globalization.  When people talk about globalization it is usually in negative terms, the damage it does to the environment and cultures.  Globalization can be a force for good but it has just as often been a force of destruction and dislocation.  Globalization in itself is a neutral force it is the way it is used that created a positive or negative impact.  Globalization has been occurring since the 1500 when European traders began trading with the Arab and the Asian regions.  The swapping of languages and cultural ideas has been going on for as long.  Today the speed of globalization is what many people are worried about.  In the past it was slower and more controlled, today with instant communications the changes are rapid and chaotic.  This can be scary and disturbing.  The way people in developing countries deal with these changes are not that much different form how the developed world dealt with the same or similar changes 100 years ago.  The world today is watching and so the developing countries are more visible in their industrialization and labor problems then the developed countries were when they went through the same processes.  The end result of Globalization is anyone’s guess but there is no denying that it has changed the world we live in.

Amy Marques's curator insight, January 29, 2014 11:03 PM

This is a great example that shows the positive and negative effects of globalization. The negative effects is that the chief Almir and the Surui tribe have changed from their original roots through contact with the outside world. Their language and clothing has been altered because we see the cheif speaking brazilian portugese and the tribe wearing western clothing. The positive aspect is that they are trying to protect their ancient rain forests by using the benefits of globalization. I think its great that Google is helping this tribe, of course Google is getting tons of recognition for this, but they are doing wonders for this group of people. With the technology provided the tribe will be able to be put on the map and educate its group.

Michael Amberg's curator insight, March 23, 2015 10:54 PM

This is an interesting way to educate people around the world of the places that most people don't think about. its interesting to see the technology with the tribes people to see how it actually benefits their folk culture by preserving the land.

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On Nauru, a Sinking Feeling

On Nauru, a Sinking Feeling | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it

A cautionary tale about life in Nauru, a place with hard ecological limits.

WRITTEN BY THE PRESIDENT OF NAURU 

 

picture from www.discovernauru.com

chris tobin's insight:

Nauru is 8 sq miles, a sovereign nation in Micronesia with a population of about 10,000.  The currency is the Australian dollar and the language is Nauran and English.  The island has many birds, fishing, coral, phosphate mines which destroyed the rainforests, limestone pinnacles, but limited fresh water and electricity.  Monsoon season is Nov to Feb with NE tradewinds March to Oct and 80% humidity.  It has 30 km of coastline and sandy beaches but the coast is eroding quickly.  Vegetation includes coconut palms and tomans trees, frangipani flower and of course bananas.

Unemployment is high.  The eroding coast due to rising sealevels such as what is seen in Papua and the Solomon Islands and Tuvalu, Kiribate and Marshall Islands where tides in low lying areas cause people to flee their homes.  Environmental projects to restore damage from mining is underway.

 

PLEASE READ THIS LETTER FROM THE PRESIDENT OF NAURU (2011) NY Times article online

 

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Mill Ponds of North America

Mill Ponds of North America | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it

Mill ponds are icons of North American culture. Once a critical element of rural communities, these local processors became obsolete as transportation systems evolved. Although most mill ponds are no longer equipped with functioning mills, many of these impoundments live on as recreational areas or wildlife habitats.

chris tobin's insight:

The Blackstone River Valley Corridor provides a home to wildlife and the river is getting much cleaner now.  There are walking and biking trails that are well maintained.

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Ivory worth $5m seized in Hong Kong | World news | theguardian.com

Ivory worth $5m seized in Hong Kong | World news | theguardian.com | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
China's growing presence in Africa blamed as illegal containers of tusks and rhino horns found in Nigerian containers.
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Papua New Guinea

Join Steve and Manjula as they visit some of the least explored islands in the world aboard their sailing catamaran Endless Summer.
chris tobin's insight:

Papua New Guinea islands are secluded and isolated from each other, (there are 850 differennt languages) and ancient people have lived there using the resources and developing crafts. 

In 2011 Steve and Manjula sailed from Australia on their catamaran Endless Summer to Papua New Guinea visiting many islands.  Many islands have never been visited before and the natives were welcoming to them. 

They even surfed at one of the islands and a native stated that no one had ever done this before. 

They visited Palm Island where they gave gifts for the school and natives.  The natives gave them fruit and vegetables that were grown on the adjacent island used for this purpose.

They then visited an island Palm Island 14 miles away where there was no food, so they gave them their fruits and veggies and some medicine that were greatly appreciated.  The natives gave them a warm welcome.  In return, the natives gave them turtle shells (endangered species) but were unaware of that fact so were not told of this.

This exploration is available on sailblocks.com and look under Endless Summer. 

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Connecting With Nature To Reclaim Our Natural 'Birthright' : NPR

Connecting With Nature To Reclaim Our Natural 'Birthright' : NPR | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Modern society has become adversarial in its relationship to nature, Yale scholar Stephen Kellert argues, having greatly undervalued the natural world beyond its narrow utilty.

Via Stacey Jackson
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Advocating Nature and Our World

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chris tobin's comment, February 3, 2013 10:27 PM
Like your scoop! Im an advocate
chris tobin's comment, February 3, 2013 10:27 PM
Like your scoop! Im an advocate
Stacey Jackson's comment, February 9, 2013 2:44 PM
Glad to hear it. It's a pretty interesting book so far. I'm going to use some of the content in a research paper I'm writing about the importance of public parks and green space in urban environments.