Chris' Regional Geography
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Rescooped by chris tobin from What's going on around here?
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Connecting With Nature To Reclaim Our Natural 'Birthright' : NPR

Connecting With Nature To Reclaim Our Natural 'Birthright' : NPR | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Modern society has become adversarial in its relationship to nature, Yale scholar Stephen Kellert argues, having greatly undervalued the natural world beyond its narrow utilty.

Via Stacey Jackson
chris tobin's insight:

Advocating Nature and Our World

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chris tobin's comment, February 3, 2013 10:27 PM
Like your scoop! Im an advocate
chris tobin's comment, February 3, 2013 10:27 PM
Like your scoop! Im an advocate
Stacey Jackson's comment, February 9, 2013 2:44 PM
Glad to hear it. It's a pretty interesting book so far. I'm going to use some of the content in a research paper I'm writing about the importance of public parks and green space in urban environments.
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Beetles to blame for Colorado's fires? Blame climate change instead

Beetles to blame for Colorado's fires? Blame climate change instead | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Tiny, winged bark beetles have been the ecological bad guys of the West for more than a decade, and rightfully so. They've killed off millions of acres' worth of trees in Colorado.
chris tobin's insight:

"

How about eradicating the beetles? That may sound like a final solution, but even if it were possible, forest scientists would advise against it. Carroll pointed out that the BUGS ARE PART OF A NATURAL CYCLE, in which mature pines fall prey to the bugs and eventually burn in fires like the ones sweeping through Colorado this summer. Such fires consume the remaining trees in a stand, but they also RELEASE THE SEEDS from lodgepole pine cones — beginning a new circle of life."

If anything, the beetle outbreak is more serious in Canada than it is south of the border. "We anticipate losing pretty much two-thirds of the mature pines" in British Columbia's forests, Carroll said. And it could get worse: The beetles have spread across the Rockies to Alberta, the next province over. If the climate conditions are right, there's a chance that the bugs could advance eastward all the way across Canada, and down to the U.S. Great Lakes region as well." (MSN.com)

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