Chris' Regional Geography
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Rigs Map | northdakotarigsmap.com

http://northdakotarigsmap.com/#sthash.0R955q9W.0B0ciIw5.dpbs

chris tobin's insight:

http://northdakotarigsmap.com/#sthash.0R955q9W.0B0ciIw5.dpbs

 

See this site for great maps on rigs and oildrilling sites North Dakota

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On The Plains, The Rush For Oil Has Changed Everything

On The Plains, The Rush For Oil Has Changed Everything | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Black gold has brought big-money jobs and severe growing pains to once-sleepy North Dakota towns.

 

A remarkable transformation is underway in western North Dakota, where an oil boom is changing the state's fortunes and leaving once-sleepy towns bursting at the seams. In a series of stories, NPR is exploring the economic, social and environmental demands of this modern-day gold rush.


Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
chris tobin's insight:

http://www.propublica.org/article/the-other-fracking-north-dakotas-oil-boom-brings-damage-along-with-prosperi                 ;

 

  Visit this website for some good information..................

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Diane Johnson's curator insight, February 4, 2014 2:06 PM

Provides useful insights for discussing energy needs and the myriad of impacts for consideration.

chris tobin's comment, February 6, 2014 10:46 AM
http://www.propublica.org/article/the-other-fracking-north-dakotas-oil-boom-brings-damage-along-with-prosperi Also visit this website on some good information.......
Tracy Galvin's curator insight, April 26, 2014 4:10 PM

The state of North Dakota has been a very low population remote state until recently. Large influx of people into these towns is causing more problems than they can handle and may just destroy the state. Once the work opportunities run out everyone will leave, but by then all the current towns will have been changed, maybe to the point where they couldn't recover.

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Life in a Toxic Country

Life in a Toxic Country | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
My wife and I worry about how China’s bad air and food will affect our child.

.....

Every morning, when I roll out of bed, I check an app on my cellphone that tells me the air quality index as measured by the United States Embassy, whose monitoring device is near my home. I want to see whether I need to turn on the purifiers and whether my wife and I can take our daughter outside.

Most days, she ends up housebound. Statistics released Wednesday by the Ministry of Environmental Protection revealed that air quality in Beijing was deemed unsafe for more than 60 percent of the days in the first half of 2013.


Via Seth Dixon
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National Ocean Service Cleans Up Debris on the Ocean Floor of Hawaii

National Ocean Service Cleans Up Debris on the Ocean Floor of Hawaii | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it

To provide science-based solutions through collaborative partnerships to address evolving economic,... Debris is collected yearly by NOAA and please visit this site to receive updates, news and reports

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NC river turns to gray sludge after coal ash spill

NC river turns to gray sludge after coal ash spill | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Duke Energy estimates that up to 82,000 tons of ash has been released from a break in a 48-inch storm water pipe at the Dan River Power Plant in Eden N.C. on Sunday.
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Undiscovered Possibilities - Google Earth

"While Germans tend to talk about privacy and how the internet takes away our freedom, chief Almir of the Surui tribe in Brazil came up with an idea when he first came in contact with Google Earth. He saw it as a great tool to visualize the devastation of the rainforest. With the help of Google providing the knowledge and equipment he started the project and provided an unfiltered perspective never seen before. This is a growing project on a growing problem that should matter to all of us. It’s never a service or product itself that matters; it’s what you do with it. Check the video and see for yourself."

Globalization inherently brings serendipitous juxtapositions. In this clip we see the merger of geospatial technologies to protect indigenous cultures and their cultural ecology.


Via Seth Dixon
chris tobin's insight:

this will help protect the forest and decrease deforestation hopefully, also protecting global climate and environment.   How does this affect the large companies in paper mills, timber and especially the specialty tree plantations.........roads cutting through the rainforest ......wildlife........

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, January 23, 2014 7:35 PM

Globalization

 

This video shows a positive side of globalization.  The use of first world technology in the third world to stop illegal foresting is a great example of the positive effects of globalization.  When people talk about globalization it is usually in negative terms, the damage it does to the environment and cultures.  Globalization can be a force for good but it has just as often been a force of destruction and dislocation.  Globalization in itself is a neutral force it is the way it is used that created a positive or negative impact.  Globalization has been occurring since the 1500 when European traders began trading with the Arab and the Asian regions.  The swapping of languages and cultural ideas has been going on for as long.  Today the speed of globalization is what many people are worried about.  In the past it was slower and more controlled, today with instant communications the changes are rapid and chaotic.  This can be scary and disturbing.  The way people in developing countries deal with these changes are not that much different form how the developed world dealt with the same or similar changes 100 years ago.  The world today is watching and so the developing countries are more visible in their industrialization and labor problems then the developed countries were when they went through the same processes.  The end result of Globalization is anyone’s guess but there is no denying that it has changed the world we live in.

Amy Marques's curator insight, January 29, 2014 11:03 PM

This is a great example that shows the positive and negative effects of globalization. The negative effects is that the chief Almir and the Surui tribe have changed from their original roots through contact with the outside world. Their language and clothing has been altered because we see the cheif speaking brazilian portugese and the tribe wearing western clothing. The positive aspect is that they are trying to protect their ancient rain forests by using the benefits of globalization. I think its great that Google is helping this tribe, of course Google is getting tons of recognition for this, but they are doing wonders for this group of people. With the technology provided the tribe will be able to be put on the map and educate its group.

Michael Amberg's curator insight, March 23, 2015 10:54 PM

This is an interesting way to educate people around the world of the places that most people don't think about. its interesting to see the technology with the tribes people to see how it actually benefits their folk culture by preserving the land.

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Historic New England Town, Once Plagued by Tack Factory’s Toxic Pollution, Enjoys Revitalized Coastal Marshes

Historic New England Town, Once Plagued by Tack Factory’s Toxic Pollution, Enjoys Revitalized Coastal Marshes | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
For much of the 20th century, the Atlas Tack Corporation was the main employer in the historic coastal town of Fairhaven, Mass., a place settled in the 1650s by Plymouth colonists. But the presence...
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Mucking About: Stepping Into The Unknown On The Banks Of The Ganges

Mucking About: Stepping Into The Unknown On The Banks Of The Ganges | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Stair-stepped ghats hug the western shore of the Ganges River like a string of very old pearls, one after the other, fused together by faith
chris tobin's insight:

"stair stepped ghats from the shore of the Ganbges River murky brown

 water of the Holy River where Hindus pilgrimage for liberation of birth and rebirth, funeral pyres, people wash clothes, wash themselves, buy & sell products, pray, and sleep.

 They also visit at Assi ghat in the southern end of Ganges River.   This river at Assi ghat no longer exists because of civil engineers and projects that moved it south to Save The Ganga.   This plan went awry. 

Ganga River is heavily polluted with human remains, sewage, heavy metals, disease, silt and pesticides PCBs.  The name comes from the story of the Holy Ganga goddess was saved as she fell from the sky in in Lord Shiva's hair locks.

The river has a billion liters of raw sewage daily, with cholera, virulent E coli, heavy metal pcb's,and increased silt from monsoons deposited there, that is shoveled back into the river and acts like quicksandon its banks, so deep people sink into it, up to their necks!

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