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An Insider's View Of 19th-Century Paris

An Insider's View Of 19th-Century Paris | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it

"Charles Marville photographed Paris' transition from medieval hodgepodge to modern metropolis.  Marville made more than 425 photographs of the narrow streets and crumbling buildings of premodern Paris, including this view from the top of Rue Champlain in 1877-1878."


Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 1, 2013 12:34 PM

This NPR podcast adds some great insight into Charles Marville's 19th century photography currently on display at the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C.  The urban transformations designed by Haussmann made Paris the global capital of modernity and the many cities around the world copied the principles of Haussmannization.  A photographic glimpse into Paris before and during these changes that brought about social upheaval is a marvelous tool for an historical geographic analysis of urbanization.  

   

Tags: urban, historical, Paris, placeFrancepodcastimages.

Kevin Barker's comment, October 6, 2013 11:38 AM
Little blurb at the top of the link for the gallery :) "Notice: During the federal government shutdown, the offices and all premises of the National Gallery of Art and its Sculpture Garden are closed to the public, and all public programs are canceled. Employees will not have access to their e-mail or voicemail accounts during the shutdown."
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Favela Images

Favela Images | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it

I love these favela images by Fernando Alan.


Via Seth Dixon
chris tobin's insight:

building up....up.....up

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Amanda Morgan's curator insight, September 29, 2:50 PM

The favelas show that the country has not been able to keep up with the growth of urban population,  increasing population, and poverty.  It also shows how the people of Brazil use their resources to survive and build housing. There are many socioeconomic issues at stake in these favelas and with these favelas comes an increase in drugs and violence.

James Hobson's curator insight, September 30, 8:57 AM

(South America topic 6)

These images seem almost unreal in the sense that these favelas appear to be like trees growing out of the hillside. I noticed that the homes towards the bottom of the hill appear much smaller than those at the top. If all were the same size the ones on the top would appear to be smallest from this angle. Even though this is considered a favela, it must be that some are willing to sacrifice space for convenience of location. Lastly, I would imagine that it must be easy to get lost on the way to one's home... the twisting paths and lack of any 'official' streets would be a maze to an outside visitor. I wonder if anybody has had the idea to start making a so-called road map of the paths through these favelas? That would be very interesting to see.

Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 24, 9:29 PM

These images of the Favelas in Brazil are absolutely amazing. Not only does it show the poor urban parts of the city are, but just how hard it is to live in these areas, as well as, the clustered so many houses are. The largest picture shown seems like a painting and not a picture, which makes the pictures more fascinating to look at.

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National Geographic Found

National Geographic Found | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it

"FOUND is a curated collection of photography from the National Geographic archives. In honor of our 125th anniversary, we are showcasing photographs that reveal cultures and moments of the past. Many of these photos have never been published and are rarely seen by the public.  We hope to bring new life to these images by sharing them with audiences far and wide. Their beauty has been lost to the outside world for years and many of the images are missing their original date or location."


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elianna sosa paulino's curator insight, September 10, 2013 10:27 AM

I think that is a manigficient photo i can't believe that these phoos nev been published and also missing their original location.

Jacqueline Landry's curator insight, September 10, 2013 10:31 AM

These pictures are awesome. It would be nice to know the locations of some of the pictures to compare them to images now.

 

Jonathan Lemay's curator insight, September 11, 2013 2:05 PM

this is amazing!