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Rio’s shantytowns are finding a place on city maps

Rio’s shantytowns are finding a place on city maps | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
RIO DE JANEIRO — Look at most maps of Rio de Janeiro. The beaches are easy to spot, as are the iconic ocean-front neighborhoods of Copacabana and Ipanema. In the middle is a vast forest.

Via Seth Dixon
chris tobin's insight:

Being left off the map is ludicrous.  It should be surprising how many there are,what they pick for addresses, and population statistics. Hopefully this will also help them to get aid for poverty relief.

 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 25, 2013 11:40 AM

A nonprofit organization run by current and former favela residents called Redes da Mare has started the first mapping program to systematically chart out the favelas for municipal governments.  We take for granted what having an address on a named street means in a modern society; it is a portal to public utilities, recognition with businesses and countless other social benefits.  Being left 'off the map' is synonymous with being left behind.  By finding their way on the city maps they are removing some of the social stigma that sought to treat them as if they did not exist.  


Tags: Brazil, urban, squatter, mapping

Caterin Victor's comment, January 26, 2013 2:06 PM
Even the shanty-towns are beautiful in Brazil
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Undiscovered Possibilities – Google Earth

Undiscovered Possibilities – Google Earth | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it

"While Germans tend to talk about privacy and how the internet takes away our freedom, chief Almir of the Surui tribe in Brazil came up with an idea when he first came in contact with Google Earth. He saw it as a great tool to visualize the devastation of the rainforest.  With the help of Google providing the knowledge and equipment he started the project and provided an unfiltered perspective never seen before. A growing project on a growing problem that should matter to all of us. It’s never a service or product itself that matters, it’s what you do with it. Check the video and see for yourself." 

 

Globalization inherently brings serendipitous juxtapositions.  In this clip we see the merger of geospatial technologies to protect indigenous cultures and their cultural ecology. 


Via Richard Petry, Seth Dixon
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Favela Images

Favela Images | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it

I love these favela images by Fernando Alan.


Via Seth Dixon
chris tobin's insight:

building up....up.....up

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Hector Alonzo's curator insight, October 24, 2014 9:29 PM

These images of the Favelas in Brazil are absolutely amazing. Not only does it show the poor urban parts of the city are, but just how hard it is to live in these areas, as well as, the clustered so many houses are. The largest picture shown seems like a painting and not a picture, which makes the pictures more fascinating to look at.

Edgar Manasseh Jr.'s curator insight, February 14, 7:53 PM

Favelas are very important part of Brazil because it shows what culture Brazil identify. Ideologically Brazil is known as a beautiful place with beautiful beaches and beautiful people and world wide known soccer location. Favelas are having trouble with urban planners, and mudslides so its very difficult to live up on a mountain for free without consequences but that's whom Brazilians are as they show that without the government not helping them out they will strive to do whats best for not only themselves but their families.

Rachel Phillips's curator insight, May 7, 1:28 PM

This reminds me of seeing an aerial view of the suburbs, except low class.  It's row after row of houses that look pretty much the same, all small and box like.  In America, we don't see anything like this.  Even our poor neighborhoods aren't set up like this.  It's very cramped, and some of these houses look like they are falling apart, like the wind could blow them over.  You really can't even see streets, which makes me wonder what it's really like to live there, and how they manage to fit all those people so close together.