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Rigs Map | northdakotarigsmap.com

http://northdakotarigsmap.com/#sthash.0R955q9W.0B0ciIw5.dpbs

chris tobin's insight:

http://northdakotarigsmap.com/#sthash.0R955q9W.0B0ciIw5.dpbs

 

See this site for great maps on rigs and oildrilling sites North Dakota

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On The Plains, The Rush For Oil Has Changed Everything

On The Plains, The Rush For Oil Has Changed Everything | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Black gold has brought big-money jobs and severe growing pains to once-sleepy North Dakota towns.

 

A remarkable transformation is underway in western North Dakota, where an oil boom is changing the state's fortunes and leaving once-sleepy towns bursting at the seams. In a series of stories, NPR is exploring the economic, social and environmental demands of this modern-day gold rush.


Via Seth Dixon, Mike Busarello's Digital Textbooks
chris tobin's insight:

http://www.propublica.org/article/the-other-fracking-north-dakotas-oil-boom-brings-damage-along-with-prosperi                 ;

 

  Visit this website for some good information..................

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Diane Johnson's curator insight, February 4, 11:06 AM

Provides useful insights for discussing energy needs and the myriad of impacts for consideration.

chris tobin's comment, February 6, 7:46 AM
http://www.propublica.org/article/the-other-fracking-north-dakotas-oil-boom-brings-damage-along-with-prosperi Also visit this website on some good information.......
Tracy Galvin's curator insight, April 26, 1:10 PM

The state of North Dakota has been a very low population remote state until recently. Large influx of people into these towns is causing more problems than they can handle and may just destroy the state. Once the work opportunities run out everyone will leave, but by then all the current towns will have been changed, maybe to the point where they couldn't recover.

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Undiscovered Possibilities - Google Earth

"While Germans tend to talk about privacy and how the internet takes away our freedom, chief Almir of the Surui tribe in Brazil came up with an idea when he first came in contact with Google Earth. He saw it as a great tool to visualize the devastation of the rainforest. With the help of Google providing the knowledge and equipment he started the project and provided an unfiltered perspective never seen before. This is a growing project on a growing problem that should matter to all of us. It’s never a service or product itself that matters; it’s what you do with it. Check the video and see for yourself."

Globalization inherently brings serendipitous juxtapositions. In this clip we see the merger of geospatial technologies to protect indigenous cultures and their cultural ecology.


Via Seth Dixon
chris tobin's insight:

this will help protect the forest and decrease deforestation hopefully, also protecting global climate and environment.   How does this affect the large companies in paper mills, timber and especially the specialty tree plantations.........roads cutting through the rainforest ......wildlife........

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 23, 4:33 PM

Globalization makes amazing hybrid cultures. 

Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, January 23, 4:35 PM

Globalization

 

This video shows a positive side of globalization.  The use of first world technology in the third world to stop illegal foresting is a great example of the positive effects of globalization.  When people talk about globalization it is usually in negative terms, the damage it does to the environment and cultures.  Globalization can be a force for good but it has just as often been a force of destruction and dislocation.  Globalization in itself is a neutral force it is the way it is used that created a positive or negative impact.  Globalization has been occurring since the 1500 when European traders began trading with the Arab and the Asian regions.  The swapping of languages and cultural ideas has been going on for as long.  Today the speed of globalization is what many people are worried about.  In the past it was slower and more controlled, today with instant communications the changes are rapid and chaotic.  This can be scary and disturbing.  The way people in developing countries deal with these changes are not that much different form how the developed world dealt with the same or similar changes 100 years ago.  The world today is watching and so the developing countries are more visible in their industrialization and labor problems then the developed countries were when they went through the same processes.  The end result of Globalization is anyone’s guess but there is no denying that it has changed the world we live in.

Amy Marques's curator insight, January 29, 8:03 PM

This is a great example that shows the positive and negative effects of globalization. The negative effects is that the chief Almir and the Surui tribe have changed from their original roots through contact with the outside world. Their language and clothing has been altered because we see the cheif speaking brazilian portugese and the tribe wearing western clothing. The positive aspect is that they are trying to protect their ancient rain forests by using the benefits of globalization. I think its great that Google is helping this tribe, of course Google is getting tons of recognition for this, but they are doing wonders for this group of people. With the technology provided the tribe will be able to be put on the map and educate its group.

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When You Look Closely At These 10 Photos, You'll See Why They Mean So Much.

When You Look Closely At These 10 Photos, You'll See Why They Mean So Much. | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
We all age, but not everyone gets a chance to do something like this.
chris tobin's insight:

great photos and stories........please visit this site  Thanks!

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2013 Geography Awareness Week

2013 Geography Awareness Week | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Geography Awareness Week is right around the corner (Nov. 18-22)!  The Theme is GEOGRAPHY AND THE NEW AGE OF EXPLORATION.  Here are some resources that you can use in your own classroom, in your ho...
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Can you guess the dirt-cheap city? - MSN Real Estate

Can you guess the dirt-cheap city? - MSN Real Estate | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
These 15 areas are among the nation's most affordable — see whether you can name each.
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NEARC GIS Educator's Day

Notes from Seth Dixon's keynote address at NEARC's GIS Educator's Day delivered in Nashua, NH on Sept 29, 2013.

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, September 28, 2013 7:02 PM

I was delighted to invited to discuss the importance of GIS and geospatial technologies in education at NEARC's GIS Educator's Day.  Earlier this year I gave a presentation at Brown University for the Choices Program on a related topic (so forgive some of the topical overlap).  This slideshare document has hyperlinked slides so you can access the digital resources mentioned in the talk if you wish.        

mariosuarez's curator insight, September 29, 2013 1:31 PM

gis y  educacion geoespacial

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Friday’s Food For Thought: Mapping Opportunity

Friday’s Food For Thought: Mapping Opportunity | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Map Reveals Connections Between Geography and Economic Mobility By Lindsay Tilton Academic economists from Harvard University and the University of Ca... (Very interesting.
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Watermark: Terrible beauty in an epic water journey - The Globe and Mail

Watermark: Terrible beauty in an epic water journey - The Globe and Mail | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Watermark: Terrible beauty in an epic water journey
The Globe and Mail
As it has half a world away, too, at the Ogallala Aquifer, a massive underwater reservoir that supports farming operations in seven American states.
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Geography of Coffee - GIS Lounge

Geography of Coffee - GIS Lounge | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Almost everything can be seen through the eyes of a geographer.  Take coffee, for example; to most people, coffee is a delicious beverage and nothing more.
chris tobin's insight:

http://www.gislounge.com/geography-of-coffee/

 

The map of coffee consumption is interesting......we just love our coffee!

I think Rhode Island has the most Dunkin Donuts per area size

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World Meteorological Organization

World Meteorological Organization | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it

The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) is a specialized agency of the United Nations.       See this site for information on climate change and other issues

 

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'How Much Will Obamacare Cost Me?' Try Our Calculator

'How Much Will Obamacare Cost Me?' Try Our Calculator | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Nearly all Americans will have to have health coverage starting in January, or pay a penalty.
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Libya in agreement with Egypt, Chad and Sudan on sharing underground water

Libya in agreement with Egypt, Chad and Sudan on sharing underground water | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Tripoli, 20 September 2013: Libya, Egypt, Chad and Sudan have signed a UN-backed agreement  on the shared use of a massive underground aquifer system straddling the four countries known as the Nubian Sandstone Aquifer System.

Via Seth Dixon
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Charles Henderson's curator insight, September 23, 2013 4:57 PM

How might this change the population in this area?  Could desert cities actually spring up?  Or desert farms?

Rainer Emily's curator insight, October 1, 2013 8:42 AM

Political

 

This article is political because the dispute of countries over water being settled would be political  :)

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Snow Headed for the Northwest, Including Portland; Significant Rain Expected in California - weather.com Western Storm Concerns

Snow Headed for the Northwest, Including Portland; Significant Rain Expected in California - weather.com Western Storm Concerns | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
After a dry winter so far, an atmospheric pattern will set up that will allow rain and snow to return to the parched western states.
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Did You Know It Doesn’t Actually Snow in Subtropical Sochi? | TIME.com

Did You Know It Doesn’t Actually Snow in Subtropical Sochi? | TIME.com | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Here are some other disheartening facts about the upcoming Winter Olympics

 

Russia will host the 2014 Winter Olympics in the balmy seaside city of Sochi. And with more than $50 billion spent on them, they will be the most expensive Olympics ever. With the opening ceremony just under three weeks away, here’s a quick rundown on the Florida of Russia.


Via Seth Dixon
chris tobin's insight:

Here are some quotations from the article:

 

"A 37-hour train ride from Moscow, it’s located in Russia’s Deep South, on the  Black Sea, and boasts palm trees, pebble beaches and sulfur hot springs..."    ". . .   710,000 cu m of  snow taken from the mountains last winter and kept in storage."

". . . close proximity to the restive North Caucasus region, where bitter insurgencies  in Chechnya and the republics of Dagestan and Ingushetia have led to armed  rebellion and terrorist attacks in the Russian interior."

 

"According to Reuters, the Winter Games in Sochi will coincide with the 150th  anniversary of the expulsion of Muslim Circassians from the Black Sea coast that  resulted in the estimated deaths of 1.5 million people. Circassians living in  the U.S. have staged  demonstrations to protest the International Olympic Committee’s decision to  host the games in Sochi."

 

"With less than three weeks to go until the opening ceremony of the Winter Games  commences, there are still 300,000 tickets still available."

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Cam E's curator insight, February 18, 8:44 AM

I was aware of the fact it didn't snow in Sochi, but it really makes me wonder why that location was chosen, especially since it's so close to the conflict zone in the Northern Caucus mountains. One would imagine that Russia would have locations better suited for the winter games.

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The carbon map: making sense of climate change responsibility and vulnerability

The carbon map: making sense of climate change responsibility and vulnerability | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it

 

http://www.theguardian.com/news/datablog/interactive/2012/mar/29/carbon-map-infographic-world

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Why So Many Icelanders Still Believe in Invisible Elves

Why So Many Icelanders Still Believe in Invisible Elves | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
How the country’s history and geography created the perfect setting for magical creatures, whose perceived existence sparks environmental protests to this day. 

Via Seth Dixon
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Seth Dixon's curator insight, October 30, 2013 6:32 AM

I was discussing the Norwegian tradition of trolls and fantastical creatures with a friend who lived there for a few years.  She said that she doesn't believe in trolls when she's in the United States, but "when you are in those mountains with the rocks and trees, how can you not imagine that they might exist?" 

AJ A. Gildner's curator insight, December 12, 2013 7:01 PM

In my AP Human Geography class, we have discussed the varying factors beween cultures.  I think this is one of the most interesting factors because it also adds to the history and foundation of a culture.  Personally, I would like to know the reasons, for believing or disbelieving in this existence of "elves", from locals.  This belief could cause much grief for construction of the island in the future.  However, I do not believe this a big problem, because I'm sure that many people around the world would be interested in these stories (I know I am).  Someday, when I go to Iceland, I will remember this article and surely will try and seek out these fantastic creatures.  

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10 Terrifying Bridges You Need to See to Believe

10 Terrifying Bridges You Need to See to Believe | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
If you suffer from gephyrophobia (fear of bridges), click away now. From bridges so frightening that people will pay someone else to drive their car across to bridges that are just plain dangerous, these 10 bridges are the world's scariest....
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Real Estate videos: News, features and advice - MSN Real Estate HIGH RISE BUILDING IN NYC HAS SEPARATE ENTRANCE FOR LOW INCOME TENANTS

Real Estate videos: News, features and advice - MSN Real Estate   HIGH RISE BUILDING IN NYC HAS SEPARATE ENTRANCE FOR LOW INCOME TENANTS | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Watch the latest real estate videos on news covering the housing market, mortgage rates, foreclosures and more.
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Coffee in Hawaii and the other island http://www.thedailymeal.com/guide-worlds-coffee-regions

Coffee in Hawaii and the other island       http://www.thedailymeal.com/guide-worlds-coffee-regions | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
chris tobin's insight:

"Think there's coffee growing in the middle of America? Wrong. America’s only coffee-producing region is found in Hawaii, with growing conditions similar to the other "islands": Jamaica, Puerto Rico, the Galapagos, and even Australia. The most well-known and sought-after coffee from the islands is the Jamaica Blue Mountain variety. The Jamaican Blue Mountain variety is low in acidity, sweet, and silky, making it one of the most popular coffee varieties out there. The Kona variety from Hawaii is just as popular, thanks to a buttery finish, deep aromatics, and medium body."

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Miss World Drama Fueled by Host Country Indonesia - ABC News

Miss World Drama Fueled by Host Country Indonesia - ABC News | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Wall Street Journal Miss World Drama Fueled by Host Country Indonesia ABC News Beauty queens and backstage drama may seem inevitable, but at this year's Miss World competition, something more serious than hair-pulling and name-calling has come from...
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Watermark: The official trailer

Watermark: The official trailer | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QOPLs_ogF-0&feature=player_embedded
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The Great September Gale

The Great September Gale | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
chris tobin's insight:

http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/the-september-gale/

 

Oliver Wendell Holmes (1809-1894 / United States)

 

I'M not a chicken; I have seen
Full many a chill September,
And though I was a youngster then,
That gale I well remember;
The day before, my kite-string snapped,
And I, my kite pursuing,
The wind whisked off my palm-leaf hat;
For me two storms were brewing!

It came as quarrels sometimes do,
When married folks get clashing;
There was a heavy sigh or two,
Before the fire was flashing,
A little stir among the clouds,
Before they rent asunder,--
A little rocking of the trees,
And then came on the thunder.

Lord! how the ponds and rivers boiled!
They seemed like bursting craters!
And oaks lay scattered on the ground
As if they were p'taters
And all above was in a howl,
And all below a clatter,
The earth was like a frying-pan,
Or some such hissing matter.

It chanced to be our washing-day,
And all our things were drying; The storm came roaring through the lines,
And set them all a flying;
I saw the shirts and petticoats
Go riding off like witches;
I lost, ah! bitterly I wept,--
I lost my Sunday breeches!

I saw them straddling through the air,
Alas! too late to win them;
I saw them chase the clouds, as if
The devil had been in them;
They were my darlings and my pride,
My boyhood's only riches,--
"Farewell, farewell," I faintly cried,--
"My breeches! O my breeches!"

That night I saw them in my dreams,
How changed from what I knew them! The dews had steeped their faded threads,
The winds had whistled through them!
I saw the wide and ghastly rents
Where demon claws had torn them;
A hole was in their amplest part,
As if an imp had worn them.

I have had many happy years,
And tailors kind and clever,
But those young pantaloons have gone
Forever and forever!
And not till fate has cut the last
Of all my earthly stitches,
This aching heart shall cease to mourn
My loved, my long-lost breeches!

 

Oliver Wendelll Holmes

 

 

The September Gale

by Oliver Wendell Holmes

 

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chris tobin's comment, September 27, 2013 5:16 PM
I believe he was only 6 years old when the hurricane hit
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DATA ON CLIMATE CHANGE

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Pakistan earthquake creates new island

Pakistan earthquake creates new island | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
The new mound of earth appears to be 20 to 40 feet high and 100 feet wide and rose out of the sea at a spot about 350 feet from the coast.
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