Chris' Regional Geography
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Undiscovered Possibilities - Google Earth

"While Germans tend to talk about privacy and how the internet takes away our freedom, chief Almir of the Surui tribe in Brazil came up with an idea when he first came in contact with Google Earth. He saw it as a great tool to visualize the devastation of the rainforest. With the help of Google providing the knowledge and equipment he started the project and provided an unfiltered perspective never seen before. This is a growing project on a growing problem that should matter to all of us. It’s never a service or product itself that matters; it’s what you do with it. Check the video and see for yourself."

Globalization inherently brings serendipitous juxtapositions. In this clip we see the merger of geospatial technologies to protect indigenous cultures and their cultural ecology.


Via Seth Dixon
chris tobin's insight:

this will help protect the forest and decrease deforestation hopefully, also protecting global climate and environment.   How does this affect the large companies in paper mills, timber and especially the specialty tree plantations.........roads cutting through the rainforest ......wildlife........

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Elizabeth Bitgood's curator insight, January 23, 2014 7:35 PM

Globalization

 

This video shows a positive side of globalization.  The use of first world technology in the third world to stop illegal foresting is a great example of the positive effects of globalization.  When people talk about globalization it is usually in negative terms, the damage it does to the environment and cultures.  Globalization can be a force for good but it has just as often been a force of destruction and dislocation.  Globalization in itself is a neutral force it is the way it is used that created a positive or negative impact.  Globalization has been occurring since the 1500 when European traders began trading with the Arab and the Asian regions.  The swapping of languages and cultural ideas has been going on for as long.  Today the speed of globalization is what many people are worried about.  In the past it was slower and more controlled, today with instant communications the changes are rapid and chaotic.  This can be scary and disturbing.  The way people in developing countries deal with these changes are not that much different form how the developed world dealt with the same or similar changes 100 years ago.  The world today is watching and so the developing countries are more visible in their industrialization and labor problems then the developed countries were when they went through the same processes.  The end result of Globalization is anyone’s guess but there is no denying that it has changed the world we live in.

Amy Marques's curator insight, January 29, 2014 11:03 PM

This is a great example that shows the positive and negative effects of globalization. The negative effects is that the chief Almir and the Surui tribe have changed from their original roots through contact with the outside world. Their language and clothing has been altered because we see the cheif speaking brazilian portugese and the tribe wearing western clothing. The positive aspect is that they are trying to protect their ancient rain forests by using the benefits of globalization. I think its great that Google is helping this tribe, of course Google is getting tons of recognition for this, but they are doing wonders for this group of people. With the technology provided the tribe will be able to be put on the map and educate its group.

Michael Amberg's curator insight, March 23, 2015 10:54 PM

This is an interesting way to educate people around the world of the places that most people don't think about. its interesting to see the technology with the tribes people to see how it actually benefits their folk culture by preserving the land.

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Protest in Brazil

Protest in Brazil | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it

MSN.com photo Protest in Brazil june 2013

chris tobin's insight:

June 17, 2013: Members of the Homeless Workers' Movement protest against the Confederations Cup being held in Brazil, amid burning tires in front of the National Mane Garrincha Stadium in Brasilia on June 14. Japan faced off against Brazil in the opening match of the tournament on June 15.(MSN.com)

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23 Brazil Police Jailed 156 Years - World News Report

The most comprehensive geo-political news service available on the Internet, covering over 263 countries and regions, all U.S. States and Industries.
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This occurred in 1992,,, and it took this long to get justice in Brazil

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Rio’s shantytowns are finding a place on city maps

Rio’s shantytowns are finding a place on city maps | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
RIO DE JANEIRO — Look at most maps of Rio de Janeiro. The beaches are easy to spot, as are the iconic ocean-front neighborhoods of Copacabana and Ipanema. In the middle is a vast forest.

Via Seth Dixon
chris tobin's insight:

Being left off the map is ludicrous.  It should be surprising how many there are,what they pick for addresses, and population statistics. Hopefully this will also help them to get aid for poverty relief.

 

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Seth Dixon's curator insight, January 25, 2013 11:40 AM

A nonprofit organization run by current and former favela residents called Redes da Mare has started the first mapping program to systematically chart out the favelas for municipal governments.  We take for granted what having an address on a named street means in a modern society; it is a portal to public utilities, recognition with businesses and countless other social benefits.  Being left 'off the map' is synonymous with being left behind.  By finding their way on the city maps they are removing some of the social stigma that sought to treat them as if they did not exist.  


Tags: Brazil, urban, squatter, mapping

Caterin Victor's comment, January 26, 2013 2:06 PM
Even the shanty-towns are beautiful in Brazil
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protest in brazil

protest in brazil | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
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"June 25, 2013: A boy runs among soccer balls marked with red crosses planted by members of NGO Rio de Paz (Rio Peace) as a protest in Copacabana Beach in Rio de Janeiro on June 22. The protest was a call to the government to have education, health & public services achieve the same standards as the FIFA World Cup stadiums, according to the organization."(MSN.com

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Protests Rio de Janeiro

Protests Rio de Janeiro | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
Some of the best pictures of this month
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June 18, 2013: Riot police detain a demonstrator near Maracana Stadium in Rio de Janeiro on June 16. The soccer match between Mexico & Italy for the Confederations Cup was played against the backdrop of teargas & rubber bullets as riot police confronted protesters angry over the amount of public money spent on staging the event & next year's World Cup.(MSN.com)

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National Geographic Traveler

National Geographic Traveler | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it
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This is a very good article from National Geographic.  I feel the tourist guides exploit the poor in the slums as a way to make money.  Tourists 'gawk' at the people in the slums, talk with them and tour the area.  Do the people in the slums benefit from this in any way?  Tourists gain knowledge of the slums and the people share stories with them, but do the people actually benefit by this or gain anything other than letting the tourists know how they really live?

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Favela Images

Favela Images | Chris' Regional Geography | Scoop.it

I love these favela images by Fernando Alan.


Via Seth Dixon
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building up....up.....up

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Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 1, 2015 6:48 AM

These images of the favelas are both breathtaking and heartbreaking. Breathtaking in the sense that these aerial images show the scale of the entire neighborhood. You begin to get an appreciation for how large these favelas actually are. The amount of people living in this area is remarkable. The image is also extremely heartbreaking. I can only imagine the everyday problems and issue that the residents of these slums face. In the nations so called festive city, I see little reason for these people to celebrate. These are the forgotten people of the brazilin economic boom. They are the ones who the government would not like anyone to know about. Sadness and aw some up my reaction to this photo.

Adam Deneault's curator insight, December 7, 2015 11:57 AM
Just seeing images like this make me feel sad that there are people out there living the way they do. Favelas can be defined as the "slums" or ghettos. Favelas are built on hillsides and they tend to have very poor history with the police. Since the favelas are considered to be the slum area, the government provides very little assistance, and if you were to visit the favelas, you could find for example some very poor and dangerous wiring from the local people wire-tapping.
Matt Ramsdell's curator insight, December 14, 2015 11:42 PM

This is an incredible favela village in South America. It shows how densely the population of slums are and how they are built up on the hillside. Most favelas are built on the side if the hills which are the most unstable portions because they can't afford to have a better place in the valley and away from the mudslide and avalanche areas. Great depiction of the slums.