Choice
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▶ On the Nature of Causality in Complex Systems, George F.R. Ellis - YouTube

Big Bang cosmology, chemical and biological evolutionary theory, and associated sciences have been extraordinarily successful in revealing and enabling us to understand the development of the universe from the Planck era to the present, as well as the emergence of complexity, life, and consciousness here on Earth. After briefly sketching this amazing story, and the key characteristics of nature, this paper will reflect on the different types and levels of causality involved -- stressing the important and pervasive role of highly differentiated and dynamic relationships and networks of relationships. Philosophical considerations build on and enrich scientific ones to probe these relationships. They also take us beyond the limits of strictly scientific methodology to consider and model -- however inadequately -- the ultimate sources of existence and order. This is the issue of creation, which introduces another very different -- and transcendent -- level of causality. We show that this is compatible with the -- and even essential to -- the causalities operative in nature, including those of quantum cosmology, if we acknowledge the limits of physics.

This lecture was delivered by George Ellis during the 16th Kraków Methodological Conference "The Causal Universe", May 17-18, 2012.


Via Bernard Ryefield
Zaphod Beeblebrox's insight:

This really brings up the question - what is the nature of choice inherent in the universe?  If causality defines itself as the operation of a cause onto a single, definable effect, then how does it relate to the POSSIBILITES that exist as a consequence of probability and human limitation?  In other words, can physics be the perpatrator of - and therefore the potential predictor of - what can be viewed as choice as an inexorable consequence of the surrounding conditions?

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Andrew Glynn's curator insight, January 14, 2014 8:37 AM

As I keep repeating ad nauseum, bottom up causality doesn't work when you go from things of a lower genera (subsystems) to things of a higher genera (system, which may themselves be subsystems of even higher genera).

António F Fonseca's curator insight, January 25, 2014 5:57 AM

Very interesting from the philosophical point of view.

Eli Levine's curator insight, March 25, 2014 10:59 PM

I've said it several times before.

 

It's going to take a change in the logic of politics, a different program, as it were, to operate and produce a new base level of hardware.  We are bound by some of the lower levels of physics, biology and psychology and the realities of the economic market.  These are the lower level, mechanistic laws that have to be obeyed first, in order to realize what ought to be a common goal of leading relatively happy, prosperous, sustainable and resilient lives.

 

But the politics, by engaging in a different logic that's not meant to benefit only the well to do, will ultimately save itself from collapse and destruction (ironically, the big goal for conservatives, who are so keen on implementing these boot-licking, elite worshipping and poor-punishing programs and policies) and produce a new effect from the established lower level laws that could, potentially, mitigate against major economic and social collapses that, ultimately, ruins the politics as well.

 

Way cool stuff here.  Very relevant for government and governing policy.

 

Think about it.

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Are Georgians too Impatient? - The FINANCIAL

Are Georgians too Impatient? - The FINANCIAL | Choice | Scoop.it
Are Georgians too Impatient?
The FINANCIAL
Children were given the choice to have one marshmellow now or two marshmallows in some minutes. Among the 600 children who went through the test, just few ...
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caffeine causality loop

caffeine causality loop | Choice | Scoop.it
Cartoons by John Atkinson ©2011-2014 (by Wrong Hands) (RT @WrongHands1: caffeine causality loop http://t.co/EB1uNTxsr9 via @wordpressdotcom)
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Eye-opening stuff.

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Is the famous 'paradox of choice' a myth? - PBS NewsHour

Is the famous 'paradox of choice' a myth? - PBS NewsHour | Choice | Scoop.it
PBS NewsHour
Is the famous 'paradox of choice' a myth?
PBS NewsHour
The theory that less choice can be more -- what psychologist Barry Schwartz called "The Paradox of Choice" -- is under attack as scientific hogwash.
Zaphod Beeblebrox's insight:

This is a question of arbitrarity - how much choice is too much choice?  Where should the line be drawn?  Where COULD the line be drawn?  Don't be fooled by the title, this is by no means a paradox.  It merely presents the believable idea that that when too many choices exist for an individual - in every aspect of life, nowadays, there is inevitably confusion and time-taking that is the consequence of the decision that often must be made. The next logical step is that too much choice can be, bluntly (and counterintuitively), counterproductive.

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How the Principle of Causality Points to the Existence of God | Cold ...

How the Principle of Causality Points to the Existence of God | Cold ... | Choice | Scoop.it
How the Principle of Causality Points to the Existence of God All of us, regardless of worldview, are looking for the first, uncaused cause of the universe. As an atheist (and committed philosophical naturalist), I believed science ...
Zaphod Beeblebrox's insight:

Please, don't be disillusioned by the web site; the fascinating and vital point that the 'final' cause of the universe cannot be determined within causal bounds appears in the latter half of the excerpt.  It (should) make us question whether the 'cause' of the universe can be defined such that the cause itself is uncaused.  (Obviously and conveniently for the author, simply accepting a higher God as the balance of this apparent flaw is the simplest (and least supported) solution that exists for this.) 

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Do we choose the time of our death? - Inquirer.net

Do we choose the time of our death? - Inquirer.net | Choice | Scoop.it
Do we choose the time of our death?
Inquirer.net
It is, of course, very easy for us to say that the above are mere coincidences, and do not mean the people involved had a choice as to whether to die or not at that time.
Zaphod Beeblebrox's insight:

Having posted the works of many brilliant people, I felt obligated to post something slightly less intellectually stimulating.  This is really more of a existential conspiracy theory than an analysis of choice...but have fun anyway.

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▶ On the Nature of Causality in Complex Systems, George F.R. Ellis - YouTube

Big Bang cosmology, chemical and biological evolutionary theory, and associated sciences have been extraordinarily successful in revealing and enabling us to understand the development of the universe from the Planck era to the present, as well as the emergence of complexity, life, and consciousness here on Earth. After briefly sketching this amazing story, and the key characteristics of nature, this paper will reflect on the different types and levels of causality involved -- stressing the important and pervasive role of highly differentiated and dynamic relationships and networks of relationships. Philosophical considerations build on and enrich scientific ones to probe these relationships. They also take us beyond the limits of strictly scientific methodology to consider and model -- however inadequately -- the ultimate sources of existence and order. This is the issue of creation, which introduces another very different -- and transcendent -- level of causality. We show that this is compatible with the -- and even essential to -- the causalities operative in nature, including those of quantum cosmology, if we acknowledge the limits of physics.

This lecture was delivered by George Ellis during the 16th Kraków Methodological Conference "The Causal Universe", May 17-18, 2012.


Via Bernard Ryefield
Zaphod Beeblebrox's insight:

This really brings up the question - what is the nature of choice inherent in the universe?  If causality defines itself as the operation of a cause onto a single, definable effect, then how does it relate to the POSSIBILITES that exist as a consequence of probability and human limitation?  In other words, can physics be the perpatrator of - and therefore the potential predictor of - what can be viewed as choice as an inexorable consequence of the surrounding conditions?

more...
Andrew Glynn's curator insight, January 14, 2014 8:37 AM

As I keep repeating ad nauseum, bottom up causality doesn't work when you go from things of a lower genera (subsystems) to things of a higher genera (system, which may themselves be subsystems of even higher genera).

António F Fonseca's curator insight, January 25, 2014 5:57 AM

Very interesting from the philosophical point of view.

Eli Levine's curator insight, March 25, 2014 10:59 PM

I've said it several times before.

 

It's going to take a change in the logic of politics, a different program, as it were, to operate and produce a new base level of hardware.  We are bound by some of the lower levels of physics, biology and psychology and the realities of the economic market.  These are the lower level, mechanistic laws that have to be obeyed first, in order to realize what ought to be a common goal of leading relatively happy, prosperous, sustainable and resilient lives.

 

But the politics, by engaging in a different logic that's not meant to benefit only the well to do, will ultimately save itself from collapse and destruction (ironically, the big goal for conservatives, who are so keen on implementing these boot-licking, elite worshipping and poor-punishing programs and policies) and produce a new effect from the established lower level laws that could, potentially, mitigate against major economic and social collapses that, ultimately, ruins the politics as well.

 

Way cool stuff here.  Very relevant for government and governing policy.

 

Think about it.