The Education of Chinese Americans
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The Remarkable Life of Wong Chin Foo with Scott Seligman

Chinese in America endured abuse and discrimination in the late 19th century, but they had a leader and a fighter in Wong Chin Foo (1847--1898), whose story ...

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John Jung's curator insight, October 30, 2013 7:18 PM

Video of talk by Scott Seligman,  author of "The First Chinese American: The Remarkable Life of Wong Chin Foo,"  one of America's most famous Chinese—and earliest campaigners for racial equality. 


Event moderated by Andrew Hsiao and sponsored by the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations and the Museum for Chinese in America in New York, June 13, 2013. 

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Mississippi Delta Chinese - Heritage

Mississippi Delta Chinese - Heritage | The Education of Chinese Americans | Scoop.it
Mississippi Delta Chinese - Heritage - Stories about the lives and contributions of Chinese grocers in the Mississippi Delta.

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John Jung's curator insight, November 23, 2013 2:21 PM

The Chinese community in Mississippi extended across many miles of the Delta where they operated family-run grocery stores that served many of the cotton plantation workers for over a century.  Currently, as the early Chinese and their descendants have died or retired and moved to other regions of the country, they are mobilizing to perserve and record their history for the future.

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Chinatown Paper Dolls: Kwei-lin Lum

Chinatown Paper Dolls

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Chinatown Paper Dolls [Kwei-lin Lum]  Explore many generations of Chinese-American history with this captivating collection of paper dolls.

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John Jung's curator insight, November 30, 2013 1:29 PM

A brief "fashion history" of Chinese America with paper dolls!

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A History Of Indentured Labor Gives 'Coolie' Its Sting


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John Jung's curator insight, December 1, 2013 12:39 PM

The term "coolie" has changed in meaning over time and place. It had long been used a slur against low-wage, immigrant laborers in the United States.


Due to the fact that the laborers were Asian — 9 out of 10 workers on the railroad were Chinese and the remainder were Irish — and because the workers would labor for low wages and live in substandard living conditions, the word "coolie" became a derogatory code for "Asian" (both East and South) in the United States. The workers were a prime target for criticism by labor leaders, politicians and ordinary citizens, who believed the foreign laborers were depressing wages and unfairly taking jobs.


Today, the word "coolie" has largely faded from use in everyday life. (No one, for example, would dream of calling an anti-immigration measure an "anti-coolie" law today.)


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Edmonton's Lost Laundries - Edmonton Heritage Council

Edmonton's Lost Laundries - Edmonton Heritage Council | The Education of Chinese Americans | Scoop.it

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John Jung's curator insight, November 10, 2013 1:34 PM

The history of Chinese laundries was essentially the same in Canada as it was in the United States as illustrated in this account for the Canadian prairies.

 

"Edmonton’s first laundries were started in the 1890s by Chinese immigrant labourers who had worked on construction of the transcontinental railway line, completed in 1885.In the days before in-home washers and dryers and automated machinery, doing laundry was hard manual work. Water needed to be boiled, fabrics hand-scrubbed, shirts starched to be ironed smooth, and clothes hung to dry.

Facing racial intolerance and socio-economic pressures, Chinese immigrants had few other choices, and so they became laundrymen. Chinese brothers Chung Gee and Chung Yan opened their Edmonton laundry in 1892, in a wood frame building at what was then #428 Jasper Avenue."

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The Evolution of the Model Minority Myth

The Evolution of the Model Minority Myth | The Education of Chinese Americans | Scoop.it

Alice Wong Guest Blogger for AsAmNews:    

This is  a 2-part interview with Dr. Ellen D. Wu about her new book.  


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John Jung's curator insight, November 30, 2013 12:38 PM

History professor Ellen D. Wu discusses her new book, The Color of Success: Asian Americans and the Origins of the Model Minority with blogger Alice Wong and points out that:.

"I think it’s important for young APAs to know our collectively history for a number of reasons. First, we have a duty to acknowledge the struggles of our predecessors who labored to make our society a more open and inclusive one—to the point where some people can even claim (though untrue) that we are “post-racial.” Second, understanding that the model minority was a fairly recent creation drives home the point that racial ideas, racial categories, and racial assumptions are invented by people, not facts of nature. 


Also see Part 2 of the interview: 

http://www.asamnews.com/2013/11/26/what-the-model-minority-myth-means-in-the-21st-century/

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New book unearths Canada's role in recruiting labourers from China for a secret role in World War I in Europe

New book unearths Canada's role in recruiting labourers from China for a secret role in World War I in Europe | The Education of Chinese Americans | Scoop.it
Forget Apple or Foxconn: the most secretive mass western outsourcing of jobs to China took place almost a century ago.

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John Jung's curator insight, November 29, 2013 10:52 AM

In a just-published book titled Quarantined: Life and Death at William Head Station 1872-1959 (Heritage House), Peter Johnson describes Canada's key role in recruiting over 82,000 Chinese from Shandong province starting in 1917 to perform a range of battlefield services in Europe during WW I, including digging trenches, driving trucks, delivering and preparing food, medicines, and ammunition, and recovering bodies and unexploded shells. Although not trained to engage in combat, their manpower was badly needed to support the Allied troops against the Germans.

 

Their amazing story of the Chinese Labour Corps and their passage through Canada have been so well buried that they remain little known beyond academic circles. The Chinese Canadian Military Museum Society, which has pictures of some CLC members in its exhibit in the Chinese Cultural Centre complex in Vancouver’s Chinatown, is expanding its research on the labourers.

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Discovery of his roots leads him to track history of Chinese in Mexico / UCLA Today

Discovery of his roots leads him to track history of Chinese in Mexico / UCLA Today | The Education of Chinese Americans | Scoop.it
Discovery of his roots leads him to track history of Chinese in Mexico / UCLA Today

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John Jung's curator insight, September 28, 2013 2:24 PM
Growing up in a predominantly white Los Angeles County suburb, Robert Chao Romero, an assistant professor of Chicana and Chicano studies at UCLA, learned to hide his Chinese background. The son of a Chinese mother and Mexican father, Romero recalled starting the first grade in Hacienda Heights and a classmate telling him an anti-Chinese joke. “It was just a dumb kid’s joke, but it sort of sent the message to me that being Chinese is bad,” he added.