Year 3 History: Chinese New Year
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Year 3 History: Chinese New Year
Celebrations and commemorations in other places around the world; for example, Bastille Day in France, Independence Day in the USA, including those that are observed in Australia such as Chinese New Year, Christmas Day, Diwali, Easter, Hanukkah, the Moon Festival and Ramadan (ACHHK064)
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Home | Asia Education Foundation | Year 3 History: Chinese New Year | Scoop.it
Asia Education Foundation website - resources for the study of Asia and Asian life. For school leaders, teachers and students. Specific sites for China, India, Indonesia, Japan, Korea, Thailand, Vietnam, Malaysia and the Philippines.
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Resources | Asia Education Foundation

History resources that support teaching about Asia
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Years F-2 Chinese New Year | Asia Education Foundation

This learning sequence explores the symbols and legends associated with Chinese New Year celebrations. Students have the opportunity to make Chinese lanterns, a Chinese dragon or lion, and perform a dance.

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Chinese New Year: Make A Lucky Lantern

Chinese New Year: Make A Lucky Lantern | Year 3 History: Chinese New Year | Scoop.it
In this arts and crafts activity, let your kindergartener learn more about Chinese New Year by creating beautiful lanterns to hang around the house!
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West Torrens Partnership's curator insight, February 5, 2014 9:44 PM

Year 3 Australian Curriculum: History

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Chinese New Year Lessons, Worksheets and Activities

Chinese New Year Lessons, Worksheets and Activities | Year 3 History: Chinese New Year | Scoop.it
Resources for teachers.
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Education - Chinese New Years

Education - Chinese New Years | Year 3 History: Chinese New Year | Scoop.it
Jennifer Baker is using Pinterest, an online pinboard to collect and share what inspires you.
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West Torrens Partnership's curator insight, February 5, 2014 9:42 PM

Year 3 Australian Curriculum: History

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Education World: Chinese New Year: Lesson Ideas

The Year of the Snake begins on Feb. 10. Introduce students to the legends and traditions surrounding the 15-day Chinese New Year celebration.
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Chinese New Year

Chinese New Year | Year 3 History: Chinese New Year | Scoop.it
Though it has undergone many changes, the celebration of the Chinese New Year–today known as the Spring Festival--remains the most important and most anticipated holiday in China.
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Chinese New Year Calendar

Chinese New Year Calendar from 1930 to 2030, as well as the Animal Sign and the number of days from today to the next Chinese New Year.
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Chinese New Year: 2014 | Infoplease.com

Find out the meaning of Chinese New Year, how it's celebrated, and what it means to be born in the year of the horse.
Asia Education Foundation's insight:

Chinese New Year is the longest and most important celebration in the Chinese calendar. The Chinese year 4712 begins on Jan. 31, 2014.

Chinese months are reckoned by the lunar calendar, with each month beginning on the darkest day. New Year festivities traditionally start on the first day of the month and continue until the fifteenth, when the moon is brightest. In China, people may take weeks of holiday from work to prepare for and celebrate the New Year.

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F–6/7 HASS Foundation to Year 10 Curriculum by rows - The Australian Curriculum v8.1

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Education World: Internet Scavenger Hunt: Chinese New Year

Find out interesting facts about the Chinese New Year with this Scavenger Hunt.
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Chinese New Year

Chinese New Year | Year 3 History: Chinese New Year | Scoop.it
Kung Hei Fat Choy!

On 10th February 2013 we waved goodbye to the Dragon and welcomed in the Year of the Snake!

What Is Chinese New Year?
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West Torrens Partnership's curator insight, February 5, 2014 9:42 PM

Year 3 Australian Curriculum: History

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Crafts and Activities for Chinese New Year - EnchantedLearning.com

Crafts and Activities for Chinese New Year - EnchantedLearning.com | Year 3 History: Chinese New Year | Scoop.it
Chinese New Year Crafts and Activities. Make wonderful, simple crafts with things found around the house.
Asia Education Foundation's insight:

Chinese New Year is a very important holiday in China. It is celebrated in late January to early February (depending on the year). It is also called the Spring Festival because it marks the end of the winter and the beginning of the spring in the Chinese calendar. Chinese New Year starts on a New Moon and ends with the lantern festival on the full moon 15 days later.

In 2013, Chinese New Year is celebrated on February 10. In the Chinese calendar, it is the year 4710, and the Year of the Snake.

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Australia Chinese New Year 2014

Australia Chinese New Year 2014 | Year 3 History: Chinese New Year | Scoop.it
Celebrate Lunar New Year in Austalia! Chinese Lunar New Year is a traditional holiday in China, also known as the Spring Festival.
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chinese new year

chinese new year | Year 3 History: Chinese New Year | Scoop.it
Asia Education Foundation's insight:

Chinese New Year starts with the New Moon on the first day of the new year and ends on the full moon 15 days later. The 15th day of the new year is called the Lantern Festival, which is celebrated at night with lantern displays and children carrying lanterns in a parade.

The Chinese calendar is based on a combination of lunar and solar movements. The lunar cycle is about 29.5 days. In order to "catch up" with the solar calendar the Chinese insert an extra month once every few years (seven years out of a 19-yearcycle). This is the same as adding an extra day on leap year. This is why, according to the solar calendar, the Chinese New Year falls on a different date each year.

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