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Chinatown | New Orleans, Encyclopedia of Louisiana

Chinatown | New Orleans, Encyclopedia of Louisiana | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
The entry provides an historical overview of New Orleans' Chinatown neighborhood, located on Tulane Avenue, active from the late 1880s through the 1930s.
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A history of the development and eventual decline of New Orlean's Chinatown that centered around the 1100 block of Tulane Ave. in the French Quarter.

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Chinese American Now
Websites dealing with contemporary issues and news relevant to Chinese America
Curated by John Jung
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Two Curated Collections of Websites on Chinese American History, Past and Present

http://chineseamericanhistorian.blogspot.com

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A brief guide to my 2 curated collections of websites on Chinese American history, past and present, on Scoop.It, and how to use the FILTER to search them for websites that were posted earlier.

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One Family's Ties with railroad work and Flying Tigers

One Family's Ties with railroad work and Flying Tigers | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
This article describes the ties of several Chinese with the fabled Flying Tigers pilots who fought in WW II.  One of the fascinating accounts is the description by Bill Chen about the linkage between his grandfather who worked on the building of  the transcontinental railroad,. his father, an ace pilot, who was part of the Flying Tigers during WW II, and himself, the first Chinese American two-star general and one who continues to document the history of the Flying Tigers. 
To see the full article, use the link to access the May 2016 issue of China Insight, pages 10-11.
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Prominent Chinese-Americans Authors & Writers

Prominent Chinese-Americans Authors & Writers | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
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Biosketches and portraits by Jason Jem of prominent Chinese American authors and writers.
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Prominent Chinese-Americans Attorneys, Judges & Politicians

Prominent Chinese-Americans Attorneys, Judges & Politicians | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
Portraits and biosketches of leading Chinese American Attorneys, Judges and Politicians
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Brief bios of leading Chinese American attorneys, judges, and politicians with portraits by photographer Jason Jem
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Chinese Laundry Kids Stories at Foo’s Ho Ho in Vancouver’s Chinatown

Chinese Laundry Kids Stories at Foo’s Ho Ho in Vancouver’s Chinatown | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
Suanne and I had such a wonderful time last week that I decided to write about this blog post out of sequence. LotusRapper alerted us to this event in Chinatown that truly intrigues me. As you know, I had been doing a lot of research on Chinese cuisines through the Eight Great Traditions of Chinese…
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Before Foo's Ho Ho,  the iconic Vancouver Chinese restaurant on Pender Street in the heart of old Chinatown, finally had to close its doors and become part of history, a  fundraiser dinner in 2010 brought together a feast of classic Toishan village dishes and talks about Chinese American and Chinese Canadian history by Elwin Xie, John Jung, and Judy Fong Bates, all of whom grew up in family run Chinese laundries.
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A Modern Dance View of Chinese Life in the Deep South: "South of Gold Mountain"

A Modern Dance View of Chinese Life in the Deep South: "South of Gold Mountain" | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it

 

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The history of Chinese in the Deep South from the late 19th to mid 20th century is unknown to most people.  H.T. Chen and Dian Dong of the NY Chinatown H.T. Chen Dance Center were intrigued  about their lives and developed South of Gold Mountain (SOGM) a modern dance performance as an homage to the lives of Chinese grocers, laundrymen, and restaurateurs in the American South. Performances in several southern sites as well as in NYC have been well received and in 2016 it will be performed in Houston and Williamstown, MA.
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United States Immigration Station (USIS) – Angel Island Conservancy

United States Immigration Station (USIS) – Angel Island Conservancy | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
Restored barracks where Chinese immigrants were detained at Angel Island
John Jung's insight:
Angel Island Immigration Station is where thousands of Chinese and other Asian rim immigrants were detained, interrogated and either admitted or deported during the years, 1910-1940.. After WWII, the Immigration Station was relocated from the island and the abandoned facility fell into disrepair .and was scheduled to be demolished.

 In 1970, Park Ranger Alexander Weiss toured the building and detected Chinese characters carved into the barracks walls. Through his efforts, those of Paul Chow and the Angel Island Immigration Station Historical Advisory Committee special legislation was passed in 1976 for preservation and restoration: of the detention barracks, and its Chinese poetry saved. 

 The Angel Island Immigration Station Foundation (AIISF) today focuses on preservation and educational efforts regarding the site and the role of Pacific Rim immigration in U.S. history.
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Chinese American Heroes|

Chinese American Heroes| | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
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Celebrating Chinese American Heroes for their achievements in many fields to make a better America
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To Live and Die in the South: The Chinese Story

To Live and Die in the South: The Chinese Story | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
Chinese cemetery, Greenville, Mississippi
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Life in the racially segregated Jim Crow South presented challenges for the early Chinese in the region, as they were neither black nor white. Given that Chinese were the only, or one of a handful of Chinese, in towns where they settled, when they died before they moved to other regions or returned to China, where could they be buried? Being so few in number, they could not afford to finance a cemetery for Chinese only.
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General Genealogy Resources

General Genealogy Resources | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it

General genealogical resources for researching your Chinese family history   

The Chinese Family History Group is affiliated with the Southern California Genealogical Society (SCGS), located in Burbank, California, and exists to foster interest in family history and genealogy, preserve genealogical materials, and provide instruction in accepted and effective research techniques.

The Chinese Family History Group of Southern California provides a community for exchange of information and support for members whose common interest is the research, collection, and preservation of the diverse experiences of their Chinese and Chinese American ancestors before their stories are lost to the passage of time. We seek to inspire people to discover their family histories by providing outreach, educational programs, and resources pertinent to Chinese American genealogy. 

John Jung's insight:
Website contains many resources for family history research for Chinese Americans including links to databases, genealogy software, immigration records, Chinese language software, English-Chinese dictionaries, guide to Chinese surnames, and much more.
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From Immigrant Stories to Refugee Stories

From Immigrant Stories to Refugee Stories | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
We all carry with us family and stories, courage and heart, intangible assets which help make us who we are, help us imagine what we could be.
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Writer-activist Frances Kai-Hwa Wang's personal essay covering three familial generations from China to Taiwan to the U. S. describes some of the differing identity challenges each generation faces.

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History Behind The Chinese-Mexican Cuisine You’ll Find Only Along the Border

History Behind The Chinese-Mexican Cuisine You’ll Find Only Along the Border | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
An 1882 law is the reason behind the surprising number of Chinese restaurants along Mexico-U.S. border.
John Jung's insight:

Chinese food in restaurants in the Imperial Valley has a distinctive blend of Mexican cuisine.  Historical factors that excluded Chinese immigrants from entering  the U. S. starting in the late 19th century led many of them to work in Mexico, and some later entered across the border illegally into the U. S.

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MooseRoots | A Genealogy Research Engine

MooseRoots | A Genealogy Research Engine | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
MooseRoots combines historical records with supporting information (names origin, place demographics, etc) to provide unique insights into your family's past
John Jung's insight:

Never mind the name, MooseRoots, this site gives you access to several useful public domain archives including census, immigration, birth, death, marriage, divorce records.  Not specific to Chinese, but one way to narrow down the yield for early immigrants is to enter CHINA in the box for birthplace.  It is not perfect, but helpful (you also get caucasians who were born in China, for example).  Caveat: although some people complain that these records invade their privacy and put them at risk for identity theft, note that MooseRoots is the the creator of these databases.  They already exist online or in archives and court records.

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yellowface

yellowface | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
Yellowface (1700s- ) is where someone of another race is made to look East Asian. Hollywood has been doing it for over a hundred years. Like blackface, it is dehumanizing and pushes stereotypes. An extremely incomplete list: 1870s: minstrel shows 1885: The Mikado - still being presented in yellowface in 2014 1908: New York Age 1915: Madame Butterfly…
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A chronology of some of the more egregious examples of "yellowface" in Hollywood motion pictures. The demaning practice has a long history and doesn't seem to have stopped in recent years.
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Asian American Legal Foundation:  Historical Mission

Asian American Legal Foundation:  Historical Mission | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
The Asian American Legal Foundation was founded to protect and promote the civil rights of Asian Americans and of all Americans.
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The Asian American Legal Foundation ("AALF") is a non-profit organization, based in an Francisco, California. It was founded to protect and promote the civil rights of Asian Americans, but is dedicated to the principle that Americans of all races and ethnicities have the right to be treated as individuals, free of discrimination. AALF is recognized as a non-profit entity with 501(c)(3) status, and donations to AALF are tax deductible.
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Prominent Chinese-American Actors, Artists & Musicians

Prominent Chinese-American Actors, Artists & Musicians | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
Bios and portraits by photographer Jason Jem of some leading Chinese American actors, artists, and musicians.
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Bios and portraits by photographer Jason Jem of some leading Chinese American actors, artists, and musicians.
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Films

Films | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
THE BAND WITH NO NAME Film Company
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Benjamin To is a writer, director, and producer who founded The BAND WITH NO NAME Film Company. His work has been featured in numerous publications, such as The Huffington Post, NBC News, and the Los Angeles Times, for creating artistic discussions about race relations, diversity in media, and gender equality.

 His series of LIFE STORIES consist of interviews (about 20 so far) that explore Asian American identity, often illuminating the influence of Asian American history. These interviews raise awareness and spark dialogue about the Asian American experience, as well as other communities of color, to provide a platform for their voices to be heard.
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Chinese Laundries and Advertising “Humor”

Chinese Laundries and Advertising “Humor” | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
Chinese laundries have been used in many advertisements, usually in a way that pokes fun.  One old print ad for a home washing machine shows several Chinese men, presumably laundrymen, standing around it with a puzzled look. A television commercial in the 1970s for a laundry product suggests that the Chinese laundry used it for getting…
John Jung's insight:
Chinese immigrants worked in laundries for over a century as other opportunities were denied to them. The Chinese laundryman became a stereotypical image and one that was often the butt of racist jokes and jibes. Laundrymen were used in advertisements with 'gentle humor' in these two promotions for home washing machines and detergents in the mid 20th century. However, the third ad in 2014 took a decidedly different approach that illustrated the abuse that laundrymen often took from customers.  The ending will surprise you!
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Chinese Scions’ Song: My Daddy’s Rich and My Lamborghini’s Good-Looking

Chinese Scions’ Song: My Daddy’s Rich and My Lamborghini’s Good-Looking | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
Many wealthy Chinese are moving their families and riches to Western cities like Vancouver, where their children show off cars and diamond-encrusted watches.
John Jung's insight:
Although the NY Times article is about the fuerdai, "spoiled rotten" ill-mannered young adult children of wealthy Chinese now flaunting their wealth in Vancouver, it could apply to many areas of the U. S. such as Orange County, where the University of California, Irvine or UCI is jokingly also called University of Chinese Immigrants.  

There is a big disconnect, or rather lack of connect, between this cohort and the ABC (American Born Chinese) and CBC (Canadian Born Chinese) descendants of the 19th century Chinese who initially came to the U. S. and Canada from Guangdong to labor on the railroad construction, work in laundries, restaurants, and grocery stores.

Unfortunately, in the eyes of non-Chinese, the fuerdai and the ABCs will both be considered "Chinese American" or "Chinese Canadian."  The long and difficult improvement in the status of Chinese Americans and Chinese Canadians over the past century is being jeopardized by the fuerdai generation.  

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Tweet from @jrjung

Tweet from @jrjung | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
John Jung's insight:
"The film tells the story of the early Chinese immigrants to the Mississippi Delta during the 19th century; then it explores how the community steadily grew in the early part of the 20th century, as Chinese families across the Delta opened grocery stores that served both the black and white populations. Subsequently, it reveals how 182 Chinese men from the Delta participated in all aspects of the US war effort in WWII, shows the transformational nature of their participation in the war for the development of the community in the decades immediately after the war, and concludes by documenting the contributions of the Chinese Delta families to the state of Mississippi and beyond as their children became doctors, dentists, pharmacists, and many other types of professionals in the contemporary era. 

 The film’s importance arises not only from its focus on an almost unknown Chinese community in the heart of the Deep South, but also from what it reveals about the immigrant experience in America. It can certainly invites discussion of some of the issues engaging the US currently."
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Who Owns Chinatown? One Immigrant Family’s Gentrification Fight

Who Owns Chinatown? One Immigrant Family’s Gentrification Fight | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
Boston’s Chinatown has been a safe haven for Chinese immigrants for generations, but it's being uprooted by urban development — lik
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A look through the difficult lives of two Chinese sisters at the adverse impact of gentrification of historic Boston Chinatown, which mirrors the same problems of Chinatowns in other major cities.
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Am I American, Chinese American, or Asian American?

Am I American, Chinese American, or Asian American? | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
In this part of three-report series on US public attitudes toward Chinese Americans, VOA looks at the impact of 'lumping' on Chinese Americans
John Jung's insight:
Immigrants in the U. S. from many different parts of Asia are categorized as "Asian Americans" by the general public, overlooking the considerable variations in their cultures, histories and socioeconomic status in the U. S. And from a political perspective, these diverse groups themselves form coalitions as Asian American to influence and promote social policy.  However, as this article, one of three, posted on the Voice of America website, points out, there are costs associated with the use of Asian Americans as a category to lump all people of Asian origin. Americans of Chinese ancestry, especially those from families that have been here for several generations, do not face the same problems as those who are from countries that do not have a long history of being in the U. S.  

The entire set of three posts can be found here:   http://www.voanews.com/content/chinese-americans-series-set-up/2450684.html
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Jukka Melaranta's curator insight, March 21, 2:23 AM
Immigrants in the U. S. from many different parts of Asia are categorized as "Asian Americans" by the general public, overlooking the considerable variations in their cultures, histories and socioeconomic status in the U. S. And from a political perspective, these diverse groups themselves form coalitions as Asian American to influence and promote social policy.  However, as this article, one of three, posted on the Voice of America website, points out, there are costs associated with the use of Asian Americans as a category to lump all people of Asian origin. Americans of Chinese ancestry, especially those from families that have been here for several generations, do not face the same problems as those who are from countries that do not have a long history of being in the U. S.  

The entire set of three posts can be found here:   http://www.voanews.com/content/chinese-americans-series-set-up/2450684.html
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Chinese Americans  Research Guides at Southern Connecticut State University

A set of bibliographies created at Southern Connecticut State University on the history of Chinese immigrants to the United States in the formats of books, videos, websites, journal articles, etc. The literature selected here depicts in different ways on how the Chinese-Americans started to migrate, how they were treated in America, how they fought for their equal rights, and how they have excelled and contributed in various fields in this country.

Resources on topics include Immigration law, history, demographics, famous Chinese Americans, museums, literature, organizations.
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Valuable compilation of resources on important aspects of Chinese America.
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The Unlikely Boom of Chicago’s Chinatown

The Unlikely Boom of Chicago’s Chinatown | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
As gentrification and changing cultural preferences wipe out urban Chinatowns across the U.S., a model for survival is being proven in the heartland.
John Jung's insight:

The historic Chinatowns of North America located near the heart of cities are dying or being over run by gentrification, with the notable exception in Chicago. 

 

"Prompted by urban unrest in the 1960s and ’70s and corresponding white flight, many Chinese people chose to move to the suburbs — or to the “ethnoburbs,” as some have dubbed them. D.C. residents moved into Maryland and Virginia. In New York, Chinese families shifted to the outer boroughs, especially Flushing, Queens, and Sunset Park, Brooklyn. Los Angeles residents headed to the San Gabriel Valley, which today is home to eight of the 10 cities with the highest proportion of Chinese-Americans."  Nextcity.org

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Michael J Melville's curator insight, February 26, 2:21 AM

I love chicago and this is a pretty interesting read

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The life, death, and small beginnings of rebirth

The life, death, and small beginnings of rebirth | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
We were seated at a long, communal table at Harry’s Detroit bar just off Cass. To our right was a group of suburbanite wannabe foodies...
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A nostalgic look back at what was once a thriving Chinatown in Detroit and analysis of factors leading to its demise since the middle of the last century up to a small attempt to capture and rebuild a bit of old Chinatown

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Capturing the Bay Area’s Chinese Maritime History | National Trust for Historic Preservation

Capturing the Bay Area’s Chinese Maritime History | National Trust for Historic Preservation | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
A San Francisco Bay Area artist researches and documents the region's long-forgotten Chinese maritime history.
John Jung's insight:

An artistic and scientific achievement by artist Rene Yung and her team in tracing and exploring  the several lucrative Chinese  shrimp fishing sites on San Francisco bay in the mid 19th century, of which only the one at China Camp remains. Using a replica of a Chinese junk, named the Grace Quan, the team sailed to these original sites.  The project is presented as Chinese Whispers: Bay Chronicles, an immersive multimedia installation on display at the San Francisco Maritime National Historical Park visitor center near the north end of Polk Street. 


An informative video of this invaluable project can be seen at: http://chinese-whispers.org/bay-chronicles/

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