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Asian-American Lawyers Act Like '22 Lewd Chinese Women'

Asian-American Lawyers Act Like '22 Lewd Chinese Women' | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
The re-enactment of a 19th-century Supreme Court case shows parallels to modern immigration debates.
John Jung's insight:

 For the past seven years, the National Asian Pacific American Bar Association's annual convention has featured dramatic re-enactments of historic trials involving Asian-Americans.

 

The latest courtroom drama by the Asian American Bar Association of New York is22 Lewd Chinese Women based on the 19th-century Supreme Court case Chy Lung v. Freeman, which involved a group of women from China who sailed to San Francisco without husbands or children.

 

California's commissioner of immigration deemed them as "lewd and debauched," and a state law banned the women from entering the U.S. unless each paid $500 in gold. The state law was ruled unconstitutional in 1875 by the Supreme Court, which reaffirmed that immigration laws are for Congress to decide.

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Poetry From the Schoolyard: A-Z American Born Chinese

Poetry From the Schoolyard: A-Z American Born Chinese | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
'I remember when I first learned my ABCs. A is for apple, B is for bird, and C is for cat, but further experience taught me, that ABC means American Born Chinese.'
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When 12-year-old Sophia Huynh was assigned to write a poem about a social issue for her seventh grade class, she wrote “A-Z American Born Chinese,” an insightful take on race, ethnicity, and the condition of growing up Asian American. Discussing the stereotypes that she faces in school, Sophia illustrates the struggle of negotiating the expectations placed on her by others.

Sophia is only 12, but she sure can slam, and has great future promise!
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The United States Of Chinese Food

Stream The United States Of Chinese Food by Gastropodcast from desktop or your mobile device
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fascinating podcast about a variety of topics related to Chinese restaurants including early negative views, role of chop suey, the MSG debate, rise of dine and dance restaurants in the 1920s (which also involved somewhat clandestine love tysts), rise of AYCE buffets, Jews and Chinese food, new Chinese food from many regions of China.
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Chinese Opera in North America | Library of Congress Blog

Chinese Opera in North America | Library of Congress Blog | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it

In  her new book "Chinatown Opera Theater in North America,” music scholar Nancy Yunhwa Rao tells the story of how Chinatown opera, performed initially to entertain Chinese immigrants, developed into an important part of America’s musical culture.

John Jung's insight:
"Whether for young children and their families, men and women doing menial work at laundries or merchants and store owners, Cantonese opera was an important form of musical utterance. Few other genres matched opera songs as apt expressions of mood, values and feelings for them.."

Cantonese opera records began to be very popular in late 1920s with the advent of better technology, so opera could be heard everywhere—.. The arias were also common in print form as published anthologies of lyrics, pamphlets that came with recordings and playbills on which lyrics were printed. I wrote about a Chinese-American woman growing up in Mississippi listening to Cantonese opera recordings in the back of her family grocery store..." 

"In the Roaring Twenties, many forward-thinking performing artists and composers from outside of Chinese communities attended performances and drew from the aesthetics and expression to craft modern music, theater and dance. Composers such as John Cage and Lou Harrison were famous examples."
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State Supreme Court Overrules Racist Decision That Stood For 125 Years

State Supreme Court Overrules Racist Decision That Stood For 125 Years | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
California Supreme Court’s decision posthumous admission of Hong Yen Chang into the state bar association exposes a legacy of bigotry that rivals Jim Crow.
John Jung's insight:
Hong Yen Chang, the first Chinese to become a lawyer in the U.S. faced discriminatory laws that prevented him from practice. in 1890. 
Chang came to the United States from China as a young boy in 1872. Sixteen years later, he’d earned degrees from Yale and Columbia Law School and, after a legal fight that culminated in an act of the state legislature permitting him to seek admission to the New York bar, he became the “only regularly admitted Chinese lawyer in this country.”

When he moved to California, the State  Supreme Court ruled that “courts are expressly forbidden to issue certificates of naturalization to any native of China” under thie 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act .and because the court also determined that Chang had to be eligible to become a United States citizen in order to be admitted to the bar, that was the end of Chang’s ambitions to practice law in California.

In 2015, only 125 years later after he was prevented from practicing law, Chang was posthumously admitted to the California bar the California Supreme Court, which ironically included 2 Chinese Americans, Justice Ming Chin, the son of Chinese immigrants, and Justice Goodwin Liu, a Taiwanese American whose parents also immigrated to the United States.

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Chinatown's swap meets once opened a door to the American dream. Now, their future is uncertain

Chinatown's swap meets once opened a door to the American dream. Now, their future is uncertain | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
As tourism to the neighborhood declined and online retailers and Chinese commercial centers in the San Gabriel Valley siphoned customers away, the swap meets froze in time.
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 Swap meets.....What was once a decent way to make a living fin Chinatown for new struggling immigrants  mostly from southeast Asian is no longer viable.  Rising rents, decaying store premises, and competitive pricing from newer merchants, especially Amazon are killing these small businesses.
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Immigrant Voices: Discover Immigrant Stories from Angel Island

Immigrant Voices: Discover Immigrant Stories from Angel Island | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
Discover the stories of Pacific Coast Immigrants from around the world.
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Website of Angel Island Immigration Station Foundation provides many valuable resources about immigrants from China and other parts of Asia, especially interviews of immigrants who arrived, and were often detained, at Angel Island in the San Francisco bay. Site also has excellent lists of books on Chinese immigrants for school age students and for adults: https://aiisf.org/education/resources/book-recommendations
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Books: '100 Chinese Silences' by Timothy Yu

Books: '100 Chinese Silences' by Timothy Yu | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
 When I attended the Kundiman poetry retreat in summer 2012, Timothy Yu read one of the poems that would eventually become part of his book 100 Chinese Silences.
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From reviewer Leah Silvieus:  
"Characterized by excoriating wit and a meticulous attention to detail, the collection serves as a hilarious and wide-ranging index of appropriation and marginalization of Asian and Asian American voices, stories and symbols in the Western literary canon. Yu approaches this collection with surgical precision by taking on the original poems line-by-line, sometimes word-by-word and even syllable-by-syllable, in order to vivisect the white orientalist fantasy. In doing so, he reveals how fragile -- and sometimes ridiculous -- the fantasy is."
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 Chinese american clothes at the Smithsonian ( Virginia Lee Mead Collection

 Chinese american clothes at the Smithsonian ( Virginia Lee Mead Collection | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
Lee B. Lok (1869 – 1942) immigrated from Guangdong Province, China in 1881 and soon moved to New York Chinatown where he worked in the Quong Yuen Shing & Co. general store and became head of the store in 1894 which upgraded his status from “coolie” to “merchant” and allowing him to bring his wife Ng Shee from China to New York where they raised seven children. 
    Some of the clothes worn by this family are part of the Chinese American Clothes in the Virginia Lee Mead Collection.
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We know about the work and living conditions of early Chinese immigrants, but not much about the styles of clothing. This collection at the Smithsonian contains a sample of clothing items from a NY Chinese family. 
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Will Trump Repeat the Historic Chinese Exclusion Act Mistake?

Will Trump Repeat the Historic Chinese Exclusion Act Mistake? | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
The president’s executive orders hurl America back to 1882, when Congress passed a law barring immigration based on a specific race and national origin.
- 2017/04/28
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Historian Judy Yung points out the parallels between the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 and Donald Trump's plans to ban Muslim immigrants.  There are similar circumstances and rationalizations for the two racist bans and the consequences for their victims.
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The Chinese Exclusion Act at History Film Forum 2017

On May 6th, 1882 – on the eve of the greatest wave of immigration in American history – President Chester A. Arthur signed into law a unique piece o
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Panel discussion at the Smithsonian National Museum of American history in March 2017 featuring film makers Ric Burns and Li-Shun Yu talking AFTER  the screening of an early cut of their forthcoming acclaimed documentary, The Chinese Exclusion Act, that will air on PBS late in 2017.
Note: this video does not show any of the actual film., but here is a link to a trailer for the documentary:
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The Past, Present, and Future of Chinatown’s Changing Culinary Landscape

The Past, Present, and Future of Chinatown’s Changing Culinary Landscape | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
In four years, over a dozen of eateries have sprouted in Chinatown’s Far East Plaza and its surrounding area, bringing in tow a new vibe, clientele, and cultural and housing changes — both good and bad, depending on whom you speak to — to the community.
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Chinatowns everywhere are challenged to survive. This article describes the efforts to revive the historic Chinatown in Los Angeles with new and reinvented Chinese restaurants to attract tourism.are challenged to survive. This article describes the efforts to revive the historic Chinatown in Los Angeles with new and reinvented Chinese restaurants to attract tourism.
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I Am Not Your Asian Stereotype | Canwen Xu | TEDxBoise

Bad driver. Math wizard. Model minority. In this hilarious and insightful talk, eighteen-year-old Canwen Xu shares her Asian-American story of breakin
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An insightful TED Talk by Canwen Xu of some of the difficulties she has experienced as an Chinese American (actually, applies to other Asian Americans)  in the face of racial stereotypes held by mainstream society.
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Wong Laundry Building, Portland

Wong Laundry Building, Portland | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it

Campaign to restore Portland's Wong Chinese Laundry building

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"1908 Wong Laundry Building is significant to Portland’s economic history and to the ethnic and immigration history of both city and state. Designed by Alexander C. Ewart, the two-story masonry structure combining retail on the ground floor and lodging above is a prime example of early 20th century commercial architecture built for the travelers, businessmen and workers pouring forth from the new Union Station.

For decades the Wong Laundry Building has been experiencing demolition by neglect attributable to a lack of access to capital for needed major restoration."
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Running out of time

Running out of time | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
During the past year, whenever I sit down to write about Hanford’s Chinatown history, lyrics from the musical “Hamilton” play in my mind for a few minutes. I turn on
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The latest Hanford Sentinel newspaper column in search of history by Arianne Wing, niece of legendary Richard Wing who created a chinois restaurant, Imperial Dynasty, in the middle of "nowhere" (Hanford, CA. to be precise) that attracted celebrities from far and wide during its heyday in the middle  20th century unitl it closed in 2006. 

For background of Imperial Dynamsty See: https://www.mprnews.org/story/npr/5298206

Arianne, herself now a restaurateur and cookbook author,  laments all the lost opportunities she had in the past to ask relatives and old time residents of Hanford about the rich history of the Chinese community in Hanford. In closing, she cautions:

"Our history, no matter how mundane, is woven of threads that are the very fabric of individual, family, clan, cultural and community lives. Share your stories, your family history with family members and write it down. Don’t wait until you’re running out of time."

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Inside The Chinese Food Mecca Of Los Angeles [Chinese Food: An All-American Cuisine, Pt. 3] | AJ+

Los Angeles' San Gabriel Valley is the Chinese food mecca of the U.S., representing dishes from most regions of China. In this video, we'll learn how th
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Third of a series on Chinese restaurant cuisine in different parts of the U.S.  The discussion focuses on food, but brings in the history of the community, and how each of the 3 regions covered in the series is unique. This segment is about the San Gabriel Valley (SGV) to the northeast of downtown Los Angeles and it historic Chinatown.  Discussion of the affluence, and cultural isolation, of many mainland, Taiwanese, and Hong Kong Chinese living across the SGV and some of the tensions between nonChinese and Chinese is also raised.
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Cracking open a case of fortune cookie theft

Cracking open a case of fortune cookie theft | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
This week on The World in Words podcast, producer Lidia Jean Kott cracks open a case of fortune cookie theft. How did fortunes become a staple at Chinese restaurants in the US? And why are fortune cookie fortunes never really fortunes?
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Hardly an important aspect of the history of Chinese in America, but yet the venerable confection that signals the end of a meal at most Chinese restaurants managed to become an indispensable icon of a Chinese meal in the minds of many.  This podcast gives a history of its origins and development. 
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Meet the Chinese 'parachute kids' who travel to America alone for school

Meet the Chinese 'parachute kids' who travel to America alone for school | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
ARCADIA, California — Ryan Ren loves the soccer fields around his middle school in Arcadia, California. They don’t exist in his hometown of Guangzhou, China, but the 14-year-old student hasn’t been to Guangzhou in a while. Ryan is what’s known as a “parachute kid,” that is, a young person who comes to America alone to study.
John Jung's insight:
This newer generation of Chinese children who are sent from China by parents who remain to work in China are quite different from the earlier Chinese immigrant children who came with their parents or were born in the U. S. to immigrant parents. It will be interesting to see how these two subgroups of "Chinese Americans" fare in the future.
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Teaching Kids About Growing Up Chinese American in San Francisco with An American Girl Story - Ivy & Julie 1976: A Happy Balance - Tech Savvy Mama

Teaching Kids About Growing Up Chinese American in San Francisco with An American Girl Story - Ivy & Julie 1976: A Happy Balance - Tech Savvy Mama | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
This is a sponsored post As a child of the 70s who grew up in the San Francisco Bay Area, watching An American Girl Story — Ivy & Julie 1976: A Happy Balance was like a peek into my childhood. The newest American Girl special tells the story of Ivy Ling, a 10-year-old Chinese-American girl…
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"TEACHING KIDS ABOUT GROWING UP CHINESE AMERICAN IN SAN FRANCISCO WITH AN AMERICAN GIRL STORY – IVY & JULIE 1976: A HAPPY BALANCE 
 (One of Amazon's American Girl movies)

March 22, 2017 
 Leticia Barr, a blogger on parenting in the digital age presents several important topics that kids could discuss after viewing this film to further their understanding of cultural differences and how they affect the development of identity.

"Ivy Ling is a 10-year-old Chinese-American girl growing up in San Francisco in 1976 who wants to be like her all-American best friend, Julie Albright. Ivy struggles to find a balance being both Chinese and American, especially as Chinese New Year approaches and she’s faced with choosing between her family’s traditions and her love of gymnastics. When her gymnastics tournament and her family’s big Chinese New Year dinner happen on the same day, Ivy turns to Julie to help her with a difficult choice but in the end, makes the decision on her own."
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How Asian Americans Remade Suburbia

How Asian Americans Remade Suburbia | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
Asian immigrants, once the “ultimate outsiders,” have profoundly reshaped the suburbs of San Francisco.
John Jung's insight:
As  suburban demographics have changed with more Asian Americans in a space once exclusively white, schools, retail spaces, and even private residences have become battlegrounds for a growing struggle to define the identity of suburbia.
Asian Americans have changed the mall in terms of the store configurations, usage, and ownership models to make it  better reflect their identity and these changes have also been points of tension.  
A new book, "Trespassers? Asian Americans and the Battle for Suburbia," by Professor Willow Lum Aman, explores that tension in the context of Fremont, California, the largest Asian American-majority suburb in the Silicon Valley.

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The split at the heart of Chinese America - SupChina

The split at the heart of Chinese America - SupChina | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
Affirmative action used to be about black and white. But new Chinese immigrants have “scrambled that traditional thinking,” and clashed with the so-called Chinatown Chinese.
John Jung's insight:
Chinese in America pre-1965 and post-1965 are misleadingly classified as a unitary group. "Chinese Americans."  The truth of the matter is that these two groups differ on many dimensions, and the issue of affirmative action vividly illustrates how divergent their views are on this topic, a conflict that exists on less obvious dimensions as well.
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Detroit Chinatown History

Detroit Chinatown History | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
An informative and impressive archive of documents and articles about the history of Detroit Chinatown, before its decline, curated by an undergraduate at Wayne State, Chelsea Zuzindlak, over a decade ago.
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This is an impressive archive of documents and articles about the history of Detroit Chinatown, before its decline, curated by an undergraduate at Wayne State, Chelsea Zuzindlak, over a decade ago. I used the color blue to highlight the website menu on the kiosk because it may not be immediately apparent that each of the four menu items lead to a wealth of information.
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The Largest Lynching In US History

“I can see history repeating itself today.” Check out more awesome videos at BuzzFeedVideo! http://bit.ly/YTbuzzfeedvideo GET MORE BUZZFEED
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Most people are unaware of an atrocious incident in Los Angeles Chinatown in 1871 when an angry mob reacting to the accidental death of a white man caught in gunfire between 2 feuding Chinese destroyed almost all the buildings in Chinatown, attacked many Chinese, and hung 18 Chinese.   This video shows the reactions of some young Chinese Americans who did not previously know about this horrible incident.
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First Students to Come to MIT From China As Early as 1877

First Students to Come to MIT From China As Early as 1877 | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
A xmas reunion in 1890  for early Chinese students who attended MIT
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A fascinating archive of ephemera curated by Prof. Emma Teng related to Chinese attending MIT during the last quarter of the 19th and first third of the 20th century.  Note: each icon on the home page is a menu button that will lead you to more detailed information.
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From California to Kaiping

In a country that is so diverse and so culturally rich, what does it mean to be American? I try finding that answer by looking into my own family's roots i
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American Born Chinese (ABC) Casey Chin's insightful and inspired documentary about his journey back to the ancestral village of his grandfather. He imagines why his grandfather emigrated to California over a century ago, followed later by his grandmother, using false papers to circumvent the Chinese Exclusion Act passed in 1882.  He imagines what their difficult lives must have been like in the face of strong anti-Chinese sentiment of the times. He learned that after his grandfather died, his grandmother, a real "tiger," took over and successfully ran the family cafe in addition to making shrewd real estate investments.
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The Dalles Chinatown Site, The Dalles

The Dalles Chinatown Site, The Dalles | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
Visit the post for more.
John Jung's insight:
The Dalles Chinatown is a highly significant archaeological site located on the south side of East First Street between Washington and Court Streets. The site may be the best preserved, and most extensive, historic ethnic urban archeological site in the state. It has a rich and unique story to tell with two extant buildings and an undisturbed deposit of below-ground archaeological resources that tell the story of the Chinese experience in Oregon.
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About Chinatown - Save Our Chinatown Committee - Riverside California

About Chinatown - Save Our Chinatown Committee - Riverside California | Chinese American Now | Scoop.it
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The historic Chinatown of Riverside, CA., like many others, has been in danger of disappearance in the wake of urban development. Riverside Chinese have been actively campaigning for the past decade to preserve some aspects of their Chinatown.
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