Chinese American history
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Chinese American history
Websites related to the history of Chinese in North America
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Where did I come from? Chang鄭 Chock卓 Sai 佘Wung翁 and Ching

Where did I come from? Chang鄭 Chock卓 Sai 佘Wung翁 and Ching | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
‘An adventure to find more of my Chinese heritage and my home village’
John Jung's insight:
Russell Chang notes: "I’m of Chinese descent and born in Hawaii. .... My parents were born in Hawaii. My Grandparents were born in Hawaii, and some of my Great-Grandparents were born in Hawaii”. Not “in a van down by the river” as Matt Foley may have said. The amazing thing is that I believe that I am 100% Chinese… all of my ancestors married Chinese."
     He shares his extensive and fruitful search for his ancestral roots in Guangdong, providing valuable tips and resources such as village maps. google maps, and databases.
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Jukka Melaranta's curator insight, March 13, 11:21 AM
Russell Chang notes: "I’m of Chinese descent and born in Hawaii. .... My parents were born in Hawaii. My Grandparents were born in Hawaii, and some of my Great-Grandparents were born in Hawaii”. Not “in a van down by the river” as Matt Foley may have said. The amazing thing is that I believe that I am 100% Chinese… all of my ancestors married Chinese."
     He shares his extensive and fruitful search for his ancestral roots in Guangdong, providing valuable tips and resources such as village maps. google maps, and databases.
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Harley Spiller Vintage Chinese Menu Collection 哈利•斯皮勒的经典中餐菜单收藏

Harley Spiller Vintage Chinese Menu Collection 哈利•斯皮勒的经典中餐菜单收藏 | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
Chinese Cuisine art posters, Chinese food prints, art, poster, print, Chinese cuisine fine art, artwork, art work, giclee, paintings, reproduction Food and drink, 哈利•斯皮勒的经典中餐菜单收藏
John Jung's insight:
Harley Spiller has a Guinness World Record for his hugh collection of Chinese restaurant menus dating back to 1910.  
 
These menus are a fascinating record of how Chinese food became a staple of American cuisine and  have striking graphics and fabulous imagery.
 
(This commercial site offers giclee prints and mugs of some of these menus.).
 
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The Untold Story of Chinese Restaurants in America

Virtually every American community has Chinese restaurants – and the story of how this came to be is fascinating and highly revealing about the often unintended impact of U.S. immigration rules.

John Jung's insight:

Historian Heather Lee discusses her ongoing research to trace the intersection between the spurt in growth of Chinese restaurants in the 1920s and the tactics used by Chinese to form merchant partnerships to circumvent the 1882 law barring Chinese laborers from entering the U. S.

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The hidden history of Seattle's anti-Chinese violence

The hidden history of Seattle's anti-Chinese violence | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
The Seattle waterfront is the city's photogenic front porch. It's a tourist attraction, and a camera-friendly place to capture the essence of Seattle, while ferryboats blow their horns and cars speed or crawl by on the viaduct. But something might be missing. - Local - MyNorthwest.com
John Jung's insight:

In February, 1886, Chinese were driven out of Seattle by angry mobs resentful that Chinese laborers were taking jobs away from whites. Similar violence occurred during the 1880s and 1890s in the Pacific Northwest and other parts of the U. S.

 

As the article notes: "...there seems to be a collective gap in community consciousness about the anti-Chinese violence that happened here, and about what it all means to greater Seattle, circa 2016."

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Chinese Brought in As Shoe Factory Workers in a New England Labor Strike of 1870

Chinese Brought in As Shoe Factory Workers in a New England Labor Strike of 1870 | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
 A study of the 75 Chinese boys brought to break a labor strike, 1870 at a shoe factory in North Adams. MA.
John Jung's insight:

Historic 1870 case of a shoe factory owner recruiting 75 Chinese from San Francisco to replace striking workers in North Adams, Massachusetts where many had never seen a Chinese before.


This site contains archival documents, news articles, and photographs to provide an instructional tool for schools.

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Chinese American Genealogy Webinar

Live broadcast: 1/21/2016 Presented by: Alice Kane Chinese-American family history research can be conducted using standard genealogical resources such as ce...
John Jung's insight:

Excellent webinar for researching Chinese American genealogy presented by Alice Kane for the New England Historic Genealogical Society.  The first 17 mins. cover historical background and anyone familiar with it could jump ahead to the section on genealogical resources, methods, and problems.

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History of Oakland's Chinatown

History of Oakland's Chinatown | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
Wlliam Gee Wong, author of [Yellow Journalist: Dispatches from Asian America], talks about the history of Oakland's Chinatown neighborhood and his experience as a Chinese American growing up in the area.
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William Gee Wong, journalist and author, who grew up in Oakland's Chinatown discusses the history of this community.

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The Chinese Exclusion Act by Cheryl Davis & Mia Morrison on iBooks

 The Chinese Exclusion Act is an 82 page ibook by Cheryl Davis & Mia Morrison. You can read this ibook with iBooks on your iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, or Mac.

 

      An itunes U course is a self-paced course designed to take 21 weeks that incorporates the companion book, articles, videos, and assignments.   You can explore, discover, and research in the digitized records of the National Archives to further understand the impact of the Chinese Exclusion Act and related legislation. 

https://itunes.apple.com/us/course/the-chinese-exclusion-act/id1040169752

John Jung's insight:

An outstanding multi-media interactive resource with some video clips about the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882, with examples of cases and documents related to different aspects of Chinese immigration including interrogation, certificates of residence, deportation decisions.  Even though you are asked to 'buy' this ibook on itunes, it is really free.

 

It is a slow download, and requires MacOs or I OS to see it on Apple devices, but not on Kindles.

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New York Chinatown's Historic Public School 23

In 1984 the New York Chinatown History Project took up residence in four rooms of 70 Mulberry Street. The museum was on the second floor; its gallery space designed by the NYC architects Billie Tsien and Tod Williams. 70 Mulberry Street was formerly Public School 23. The Norman Romanesque Revival building was constructed in 1892, and was one of the first school buildings designed by C.B.J. Snyder, a noted architect and Superintendent of School Buildings for the New York City Board of Education from 1891 to 1923. Schools designed by Snyder in other parts of the city have been landmarked (see the Census listing for P.S. 64/ El Bohio). Until it closed in 1976, many of Chinatown's children attended school at P.S. 23. The New York Chinatown History Project, which was subsequently named the Museum of Chinese in America (MoCA), hosted an exhibit called What Did You Learn In School Today? P.S. 23, 1893-1976.
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Oral Histories of Chinese Vietnamese in America

Oral Histories of Chinese Vietnamese in America | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
Narrating the Chinese Vietnamese Identity is an oral history project that
investigates the histories, cultural backgrounds, communities, and pre- and
post- migration identities of the first and second generation of Chinese
Vietnamese in America.
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A site examining personal experiences and identity of Chinese Vietnamese in America that is a valuable resource for understanding the history of this relatively newer subgroup of Chinese Americans.

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A Legal Analysis of Gong Lum v.Rice 1927 case of Mississippi school segregation against Chinese

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A distinguished legal scholar provides a detailed analysis of this important but usually ignored ruling of the Supreme Court against Mississippi Chinese

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The little-known history of Arizona’s Chinese

The little-known history of Arizona’s Chinese | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
One insight struck Chia-Lin Pao Tao when she arrived in Tucson in 1976. She was most surprised by how few Asians she saw along with little, if any, marks of Chinese legacy in the area. Today, she knows differently. The Chinese have a long connection to Arizona’s past, playing substantial roles in the state’s development …
John Jung's insight:

Overview of the history of Chinese in Arizona and the contributions they made to their communities despite the racial prejudices they faced for decades.

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金山夢-尋找道釘記憶第二集傳奇Memories of the Golden Spike-Ep2

在一望無際的美國內華達山脈上,海拔2100米的塞拉嶺終年積雪,險峭無比,盡是堅不可摧的花崗岩。而在百余年前,華工們正是在這裡歷經了歷史上最為寒冷的兩個冬天,用雙手、鐵鎬、重錘和炸藥,洞穿了整座大山,創造了世界工程史上的奇跡——絕頂隧道。從一天三釐米到一天十六公裡,不可思議的鋪軌紀錄,至今無人能破。翻越崇山峻嶺,穿...
John Jung's insight:

Episode 2: Memories of the Golden Spike describes the arduous work of the Chinese on the completion of the transcontinental railroad over the Sierra Mountains in two of the coldest winters on record. 

The miracle of constructing tunnels were created only by hand tools. Laying tracks from 3 centimeters to 16 kilometers a day; they have made such an unbeatable achievement.  Climbing over the lofty mountains and crossing through the boundless deserts, the Chinese Railroad Workers had accomplished a giant work, yet they had paid a heavy price.

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Chinese | Women's History Matters

Chinese | Women's History Matters | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
Born in Butte in 1904, Rose Hum Lee earned a B.S. in social work from Pittsburgh’s Carnegie Institute of Technology and completed a doctorate in sociology at the University of Chicago.
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"Bamboo Stone" by Karen Minden PhD

"Bamboo Stone" by Karen Minden PhD | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
In the late nineteenth century, Canadian missionaries developed a medical training program for Chinese students in the city of Chengdu, Sichuan Province, in southwestern China. From modest beginnings, the training evolved into a medical and dental college at West China Union University, a joint venture by five Western mission boards. The college provided an institutional setting for the interaction of two cultures for the transmission of Western medical knowledge. Minden describes both the process and the longterm implications by tracing the history of the college and the careers of its students and faculty. The school's history is linked to the political turmoil that has troubled China since the fall of the Qing Dynasty in 1911. Minden follows the progress of the college from 1888, taking the reader through the Sino-Japanese war in the 1930s, the Civil War of 1945-9, and the political upheavals in the People's Republic of China. She also explores the background, motivations, and campus life of both students and faculty, and follows their careers up to 1989. Based on extensive interviews and archival research in Canada, the United States and China, this study charts the range of human hope and despair during a turbulent period of history. It contributes to our understanding of the role of Canadian medical missionaries as agents of change in pre-revolutionary China, and elucidates the cross-cultural transfer of technological knowledge.
John Jung's insight:

The vast majority of Americans in the 19th century never had any direct contact with Chinese people, yet they had strong stereotypes of them, e.g., heathens.  Missionaries, although few in number, who worked in China, either with evangelical or medical agendas, were one influential source of information about the Chinese for the public.  

 

Were missionaries "accurate" in their depictions and/or did they overstate the problems of the Chinese to justify receiving continued financial support from their churches?    Did they work with a representative or with a more disadvantaged part of the Chinese community?

 

NOTE: Bamboo Stone does not directly address these questions, but provided me with an inside look of a sample of medical missionaries from Canada a century ago which helped my understanding of their work and how they might affect American public conceptions of Chinese in China, which would carryover to their views of recent immigrants from China.

 

Disclaimer: The author, Karen Minden, is the daughter of  Harold Minden, an esteemed colleague of mine when I taught psychology in Toronto in the mid 1960s. By sheer luck, this month I became reacquainted with her sister, Nancy Minden, who told me about this valuable book based on Karen's Ph.D. dissertation.

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History of Chinese Immigrants and Angel Island Immigration Station

From 1910 to 1940, tens of thousands of immigrants entered the United States through the West Coast's Angel Island Immigration Station. Located in San Franci...
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Winston Ho's YouTube playlist of several excellent videos on the history and experiences of Chinese detained at Angel Island Immigration Station from 1910 to 1943

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The Inscape Building’s Dark History

The Inscape Building’s Dark History | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
Seattle’s Inscape arts center once held Chinese and Japanese prisoners.
John Jung's insight:

Most Chinese and other Asian immigrants between 1910 and 1940 were detained at Angel Island Immigration Station in San Francisco bay. Many stories of their treatment and living conditions have been published.  B

Many other Chinese and Japanese immigrants entered through Seattle, but little has been written about where they were detained and what the housing conditions were like.. This article gives the history of the INS building, opened in 1932 and closed in 2004, where Asian immigrants were interrogated and then admitted or deported. 

The facility has been repurposed to serve as a cultural center and museum and renamed as the Inscape Center, with Inscape referring to the essential inner nature of a person or object, 

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Early Chinese in Massachusetts (1870-1900)

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Using U. S. Census records, this analysis examines demographic, occupational, and geographic characteristics of Chinese in Massachusetts from 1870-1900.  A good discussion of problems of accuracy of census records included.

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Pan America Lung Kong Tin Yee Association

Pan America Lung Kong Tin Yee Association | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
John Jung's insight:

When Chinese immigrants arrived at countries all over the world, they needed physical, financial, legal, and social support to survive.  Associations that started in China in 1662  served these mutual aid functions. One of these, the Lung Kong TIn Yee Association, based on four families, Lew, Quan, Jung, and Chew, was prominent in both the U. S. and Canada and other parts of the world.

 

 for more info:

http://palungkong.org/concise%20lk%20history.htm

 https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lung_Kong_Tin_Yee_Association

 

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Stanford Graphic Novel Project 2015 « Stanford Creative Writing Program

Click to download an ePub version of AMERICAN HEATHEN We hope you share this book far and wide, but remember that it is illegal to reproduce any images or
John Jung's insight:

Students in Stanford University Creative Writing have produced an excellent graphic novel portraying the life and contributions of the "first Chinese American," Wong Chinn Foo, who actively fought for the civil rights of Chinese around the time of the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act.

 

This is a free downloadable (very slow, but worth the wait) epub format that can only be read on Apple devices (iphone, ipad, ibook).

 

If you haven't already read Scott Seligman's outstanding historical account of Wong Chinn Foo's life and times, you will get more details from his book, The First Chinese American.  http://firstchineseamerican.com/

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New York Chinatown's Historic Public School 23

In 1984 the New York Chinatown History Project took up residence in four rooms of 70 Mulberry Street. The museum was on the second floor; its gallery space designed by the NYC architects Billie Tsien and Tod Williams. 70 Mulberry Street was formerly Public School 23. The Norman Romanesque Revival building was constructed in 1892, and was one of the first school buildings designed by C.B.J. Snyder, a noted architect and Superintendent of School Buildings for the New York City Board of Education from 1891 to 1923. Schools designed by Snyder in other parts of the city have been landmarked (see the Census listing for P.S. 64/ El Bohio). Until it closed in 1976, many of Chinatown's children attended school at P.S. 23. The New York Chinatown History Project, which was subsequently named the Museum of Chinese in America (MoCA), hosted an exhibit called What Did You Learn In School Today? P.S. 23, 1893-1976.
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Guide to Chinese immigration files during Exclusion era (1882-1943)

 to

John Jung's insight:

A comprehensive guide to the information in documents in National Archives related to Chinese immigrants entering and exiting the U. S.  Personal histories and photographs exist for some cases which can help descendants trace their family histories.

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New York Chinatown's Historic Public School 23

In 1984 the New York Chinatown History Project took up residence in four rooms of 70 Mulberry Street. The museum was on the second floor; its gallery space designed by the NYC architects Billie Tsien and Tod Williams. 70 Mulberry Street was formerly Public School 23. The Norman Romanesque Revival building was constructed in 1892, and was one of the first school buildings designed by C.B.J. Snyder, a noted architect and Superintendent of School Buildings for the New York City Board of Education from 1891 to 1923. Schools designed by Snyder in other parts of the city have been landmarked (see the Census listing for P.S. 64/ El Bohio). Until it closed in 1976, many of Chinatown's children attended school at P.S. 23. The New York Chinatown History Project, which was subsequently named the Museum of Chinese in America (MoCA), hosted an exhibit called What Did You Learn In School Today? P.S. 23, 1893-1976.
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The Chinese in Territorial Prescott - Sharlot Hall Museum Library & Archives

The Chinese in Territorial Prescott - Sharlot Hall Museum Library & Archives | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
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Prescott was one of the earliest places in Arizona where Chinese immigrants, some from work on the railroad and mines, settled in the region as early as the 1870s.

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金山夢-尋找道釘記憶第三集生息Memories of the Golden Spike-Ep3

一條由華工鋪就的鐵路成就了今日的美利堅合眾國。然而,就在橫貫大鐵路的最後一顆道被敲進枕木的同時,在美華人卻陷入了歷史上最為屈辱的60年。在《排華法案》的擠壓下,美國華人在夾縫中艱難生存。從天使島到中國城,面對冷眼、排擠甚至殘忍的殺戮,華人代代傳承了先人隱忍不屈、積極進取的精神,在異國他鄉的土地上堅定前行,開辟出一...
John Jung's insight:

Today’s prosperity of the United States would not have been accomplished without the significant contributions of Chinese railroad workers to completing the transcontinental railroad. However, after the last spike was driven in, a long nightmare began for all Chinese in America. Under the oppression of the Chinese Exclusion Act, Chinese Americans were living painfully in the margins of the society, expelled, and even slaughtered in the Chinatowns.

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