Chinese American history
14.0K views | +2 today
Follow
Chinese American history
Websites related to the history of Chinese in North America
Curated by John Jung
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Boston Chinatown Banquet - Early Chinatown

Dating back to the 1880s, Boston Chinatown is one of the oldest continuous residential Chinatown communities in the U.S., a little known fact not adequately ...
John Jung's insight:

Excellent short video documentary on the origins of Boston's Chinese community including images of anti-Chinese sentiment of the late 1800s and sample of immigration documents.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Ann Wetherell and the "Flying Tigers: Chinese American Aviators in Oregon, 1918-1945" | KBOO Community Radio

Ann Wetherell and the "Flying Tigers: Chinese American Aviators in Oregon, 1918-1945" | KBOO Community Radio | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
John Jung's insight:

The Flying Tigers and its rich Portland, Oregon Chinese Connection is explored in Andrew Yeh's interview with Prof. Ann Wetherell.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Locke, CA. United Christian Center

Locke, CA. United Christian Center | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
John Jung's insight:
Locke, in the San Joaquin Valley, near Sacramento was the only town that was entirely Chinese. The American Baptist Home Mission Society wanted to bring the Chinese out of ignorant "paganism" all over the U. S. The Locke Christian Center opened in 1922 in Locke with funds largely from the gambling hall. Rev. Wai Shing Kwok in Sacramento was a visiting minister from the late 1920s until early 1940s, but the Center never had a full time Chinese minister, without which it met with mixed success during its existence.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by John Jung from Chinese Family History
Scoop.it!

The History Blog » Blog Archive » Reconstructed Chinese altar ...

The History Blog » Blog Archive » Reconstructed Chinese altar ... | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
Fee Lee Wong left Deadwood permanently in 1919 to rejoin his family who had returned to Canton, China, in 1902. Some of his descendants still live in California today. With Deadwood's Chinese history decimated, the ...

Via NZ Chinese Genealogy
John Jung's insight:

Deadwood, South Dakota had a thriving Chinese community in the mining area during the late 1800s, but it declined rapidly after the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act, and disappeared by th 1930s.

 

Recently, a historical commemoration event was held.

 

"Beatrice Wong, 82, said she was extremely pleased that clay bricks, salvaged from the Wing Tsue building that housed her grandfather’s modest empire, were used to reconstruct the Chinese burner. The historic Main Street building was demolished on Christmas Eve 2005.

 

“Chinatown was virtually wiped from the face of Deadwood,” she said. “Today, we replaced a piece of Chinese history in this town. We have deep gratitude to the Historic Preservation Commission and the people of Deadwood."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

大明星戲院 Great Star Theater, San Francisco

大明星大戲院建於1925,曾經是舊金山中國城的娛樂中心,目前是加州僅存的一座中國戲院。 19 世紀30 年代的沿海華人勞工,到出生於美國、成長於唐人街的新一代華裔,如何承接源自故國和傳統的文化記憶,如何成功融入新社會,成為文化上的雙重國民,舊金山唐人街中國影劇院成為老一輩華僑和新一代華裔交流的一個無聲場所。
John Jung's insight:

Historic San Francisco Chinatown theater that showed live Chinese opera and Chinese films since 1925.  Recently restored and reopened in 2010, it shows contemporary Chinese films.

A film clip fromA Moment in TIme, the wonderful documentary of Ruby Yang and Lambert Yam, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ruby_Yang, on this site recreates the significant role theaters like the Great Star served in the social and cultural life of many of  the older Chinese immigrants as if it were a community center. Some made it an outing as they came in the morning and watched the films several times before leaving.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Yellowface! - The History of Racist Asian Stereotypes

Yellowface! - The History of Racist Asian Stereotypes | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
A brief History of Yellowface - Racist Asian Stereotypes
John Jung's insight:

Excellent resource on the history of racist Asian imagery.  Subtopics include:

Legal Discrimination and Violence Against Asian Immigrants

As a trickle turned into a flood, (between 1850 and 1930, about one million Asians from China, Japan, Korea, the Philippines, and India came to the United States) a backlash soon developed.

Yellowface on Stage

"Yellowface" portrayals date to at least 1767 in the United States, when Arthur Murphy's theatrical work The Orphan of China was presented in Philadelphia. 

Yellowface in Film and TV

Whites in Yellowface have a long history on screen, beginning with Mary Pickford’s Cio-Cio San in Madame Butterfly (1915). 

Yellowface Whitewashing

A phenomenon wherein white actors are cast to portray what were originally non-white characters is called "whitewashing." Instead of using yellow face makeup, the film makers change the race or origin of the characters.

Yellowface in Europe

The most blatant contemporary example of Yellowface in Western European media is a character created by Dutch TV and later adopted by Danish TV called Ushi; a caricature of a Japanese woman, but played by white women. 

Yellowface Caricatures in Politics

In 1997, The National Review magazine published an illustrated cover of then President Bill Clinton, Hillary Clinton and Vice President Al Gore, in stereotypical Oriental garb and featuring caricatured features, buck teeth and slanted eyes.

more...
shelby's curator insight, April 16, 2015 2:26 PM

MODULE 4

 

 

Yellow peril is a stereotype made against Asian Americans that started in the 1890s in California. They were viewed at a threat and the movement began with a goal to make California racially pure. Asians were first welcomed was cheap labor by after the gold rush brought thousands of Asians, they were being to be seen as a threat.

Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

The long history of ‘Eurasian’ identity

The long history of ‘Eurasian’ identity | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
MIT historian’s new book studies cross-cultural Asian-American families since the 19th century.
John Jung's insight:

Prof. Emma Teng's new book,


Eurasian: Mixed Identities in the United States, China, and Hong Kong, 1842-1943 emphasizes that relationships and marriages between Westerners and Asians are not a modern development, but go back to the 19th century.


"Teng says she hopes the book will help people think critically about the assumptions we still make today when discussing ethnicity and identity. As she puts it,  “I don’t think we’ve moved away as much as we should from biology” as a way of categorizing people. Even “the very discussion of mixed races” as a common feature of today’s world, Teng says, still implies that ethnic populations were simply homogenous 50 or 100 years ago. As her book reminds us, history says otherwise."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

The Chinese Hand Laundry in Canada

The Chinese Hand Laundry in Canada | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
John Jung's insight:

The history of Chinese hand laundries is essentially the same in the U. S. and Canada.  

 

Following the extension of the Canadian Pacific Railway to Vancouver in 1888, many Chinese labourers moved to other parts of Canada to look for work but discrimination and racial hostility, in addition to a lack of capital and language barriers, limited opportunities.

 

Under these circumstances, many Chinese established hand laundries, as a means to earn a living within the existing economic niches of Canadian society. With a majority of Chinese living in poverty, the entire Chinese community was virtually reduced to the lowest socio-economic class of society from around the turn of the century until the Depression years.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Two Curated Collections of Websites on Chinese American History, Past and Present

John Jung's insight:

A brief guide to my 2 curated collections of websites on Chinese American history, past and present, on Scoop.It, and how to search the collection by keyword topics by typing the term in the

FUNNEL-looking icon in the upper right corner of this page next to suggestions.

 

(The previous method of using the FILTER window has been eliminated)

more...
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

The Gettysburg redress: Chinese soldiers in the American Civil War

The Gettysburg redress: Chinese soldiers in the American Civil War | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
The American civil war's bloody turning point will be commemorated this week and, thanks to a small band of dedicated historians, the involvement of a handful of Chinese combatants - as well as their shameful treatment afterwards - is also being...
John Jung's insight:

"... the role played by Chinese soldiers in that historic conflict (Civil War) will remain largely ignored, as will the war's broader legacy of exclusion and discrimination for Chinese Americans.

 

Thanks, though, to the efforts of a small number of dedicated American authors, historians and civil war buffs, largely of Asian heritage, many Chinese soldiers who served in the "war between the states" have been identified, including some who fought at Gettysburg, and at least one (Joseph Pierce) of those so-called Chinese Yankees was from Hong Kong." 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Culture a la Carte: Would you like some Han Dynasty with your meal?

Culture a la Carte: Would you like some Han Dynasty with your meal? | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
King Dragon menu, New York, NY, 1976. I recently delved into the museum’s newly acquired menu collection. My focus was a sub-set of the collection: the Chinese menus, which span nearly three decades and come from all over the United...
John Jung's insight:

Chinese restaurant food, altered to please American tastes, has proved to be perhaps the best pathway for Chinese immigrants to gain an economic and social foothold in North America.

 

This food blog examines, via menu content, changes over the decades in how Chinese restaurateurs sought to increase the tourist trade.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Chinese American Nightclubs, ca. 1936-1962

Chinese American Nightclubs, ca. 1936-1962 | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
"FORBIDDEN CITY, USA: CHINESE AMERICAN NIGHTCLUBS, ca. 1936-1962" highlights filmmaker Arthur...
John Jung's insight:

Memorabilia and nostalgic photos and comments about the glory days of Charlie Low's night club, Forbidden City, in San Francisco Chinatown featuring Chinese American singers, dancers, and musicians performing Western songs and dance routines. Other prominent night clubs were Kubla Khan and, Andy Wong's Sky Room.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

The First Chinese in Dallas: 1873-1940. Stan Solamillo.

The First Chinese in Dallas: 1873-1940.       Stan Solamillo. | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
Biannual publication "devoted to the rich history of Dallas and North Central Texas" as a way to "examine the many historical legacies--social, ethnic, cultural, political--which have shaped the modern city of Dallas and the region around it." This...
John Jung's insight:

Using census records, newspaper articles, city directories, and probate files, Stan Solamillo created a  compilation of the Chinese immigrants in Dallas, Tx. from 1873-1940, listing their names, addresses, and occupation. Laundries were almost the only occupation held by Chinese in Dallas until 1890 when the number of laundries began to decline.  


Advertising by white laundries claimed Chinese laundries were not only inferior, but posed health hazards. By 1900, Chinese were working as cooks and waiters in several Chinese restaurants  and grocery stores in addition to laundries.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Merced CA. Chinatown history. Sarah Lim: Museum Notes

Merced CA. Chinatown history. Sarah Lim: Museum Notes | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
A few weeks ago, Professor Robin DeLugan from UC Merced invited me to give a guest-lecture on museums as sites of social memory to her anthropology class.
John Jung's insight:

Sarah Lim,  director for the Merced County Courthouse Museum discussed the impact of a planned high speed rail line that would run through Merced on cultural preservation goals.  She raised the precedent of highway construction in Merced back in the 1950s when the sections of town that were typically ethnic neighborhoods such as Chinatown were demolished to build expressways.

 

"Chinese immigrants settled in Merced as early as 1872 when they worked for the Central Pacific Railroad to lay tracks up and down the Central Valley. By 1880, a well-established Chinatown on 14th Street, between K and M streets, had a bustling economy and a population of several hundred.

 

The early 20th century observed a decline of the Chinese population. This was due to a restrictive immigration policy with regards to Chinese immigration and internal migration of Chinese settlers from rural areas to urban Chinatowns."

 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

THE BEGINNING - VICTORIA'S CHINATOWN - COMMUNITIES IN B.C. - BC ARCHIVES TIME MACHINE

THE BEGINNING - VICTORIA'S CHINATOWN - COMMUNITIES IN B.C. - BC ARCHIVES TIME MACHINE | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
John Jung's insight:

At one time, the largest Chinese community in Canada, Victoria Island Chinatown.  Excellent archival photographs of the Chinese community on this site.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Chinese Cuisine Patterns Revealed By Food Network Analysis | MIT Technology Review

Chinese Cuisine Patterns Revealed By Food Network Analysis  | MIT Technology Review | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
The links between different regional cuisines in China become clear when recipes and ingredients are viewed as a kind of web, say computer scientists
John Jung's insight:

An intriguing way of examining the historical changes and geographical differences of Chinese regional cuisines:

Computer scientists in China analyzed large database of  over 8000 recipes with about 3000 ingredients for 20 regions in China to determine whether geography or climate was the more important factor in the similarities among regions.

“We found that the geographical proximity, rather than climate proximity is a crucial factor that determines the similarity of regional cuisines,” they say.

That also provides an interesting insight into the way food cultures evolve. Clearly, people move from one region to another, taking their recipes with them, where they can modify them as they wish. Obviously, that happens more often between regions are geographically close."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Gambling, Addiction, and Asian Culture : Asian-Nation :: Asian American History, Demographics, & Issues

Gambling, Addiction, and Asian Culture : Asian-Nation :: Asian American History, Demographics, & Issues | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
Article about the popularity of gambling among Asian Americans, its ties to traditional Asian culture, and some of the problems of addiction associated with it
John Jung's insight:

What are the cultural traditions and beliefs of Chinese about gambling and how have they contributed to this problem among Chinese in America?

 

"Many Asians -- especially Chinese -- consider gambling an accepted practice at home and at social events, even among the young. Chinese youths often gamble for money with aunts, uncles and grandparents.  

 

Many Chinese are fascinated by the mystical qualities of luck, fate and chance. The Chinese New Year is a time of heightened wagering, when bad luck of the old year is ushered out by the good luck of the new."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Chinatowns of New York City - Wikipedia

Chinatown, Manhattan (simplified Chinese: 纽约华埠; traditional Chinese: 紐約華埠; pinyin: Niŭyuē Huá Bù), home to the largest enclave of Chinese people in the Western hemisphere,[6][7][8][9][10] is located in the borough of Manhattan in New York City, USA, bordering the Lower East Side to its east and Little Italy to its north.

With an estimated population of 90,000 to 100,000 people, Manhattan's Chinatown is also one of the oldest ethnic Chinese enclaves outside of Asia, with most of its residents now Mandarin, Min, or Cantonese-speaking and originating from various regions of China. It is one of seven Chinatown neighborhoods in New York City and nine in the New York City Metropolitan Area, which contains the largest ethnic Chinese population outside of Asia, enumerating 682,265 individuals as of the 2010 United States Census;[11] the remaining Chinatowns are located in the boroughs of Queens (three) and Brooklyn (three) and in Nassau County, all on Long Island in New York State, as well as in Edison, New Jersey.[12] In addition, Manhattan's Little Fuzhou (小福州, 紐約華埠), an enclave populated primarily by more recent Chinese immigrants from the Fujian Province of China, is technically considered a part of Manhattan's Chinatown, albeit now developing a separate identity of its own.

A new and rapidly growing Chinese community is now forming in East Harlem (東哈萊姆), Uptown Manhattan, nearly tripling in population between the years 2000 and 2010, according to U.S. Census figures.[13][14][15] This neighborhood has been described as the precursor to a new satellite Chinatown within Manhattan itself,[16] which upon acknowledged formation would represent the second Chinatown neighborhood in Manhattan, the eighth Chinatown in New York City, and the tenth within the overall New York City metropolitan region.

John Jung's insight:

An overview of the history and formation of many different "Chinatowns" in NYC, including demographic, economic, and cultural differences among them.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

History of Chinese in Carlin, Nevada

John Jung's insight:

Chinese railroad workers in Carlin, NV 1868

 

"Chinese laborers working on the construction of the railroad planted gardens and the site  was known as “Chinese Gardens,” but when the railroad was completed to Carlin, the name was changed."   


"Most of the Chinese worked for the railroad, washing engines, pushing the “turntable” around and other menial jobs.  Others of the Chinese community operated stores and laundries, or they worked as cooks.  Very few Chinese women were found in Carlin."

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

History of Oakland, CA. Chinatown

John Jung's insight:
Oakland Chinatown Oral History Project

 

Preserving Chinatown's cultural & historical legacy through intergenerational dialogue.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

SBTHP | A History of Santa Barbara, CA. Chinatown

SBTHP | A History of Santa Barbara, CA. Chinatown | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
John Jung's insight:

A new oral history project focusing on Chinese and Japanese Americans in Santa Barbara. SBTHP has forged partnerships to develop this project with theUniversity of California Santa Barbara Asian American Studies Department and library. Xiaojian Zhao, professor of Asian American Studies at UCSB, assisted with the interview structure and content, and guided UCSB undergraduates who conducted the first interview. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Anthony W. Lee. Picturing Chinatown. Art and Orientalism in San Francisco

Anthony W. Lee. Picturing Chinatown. Art and Orientalism in San Francisco
John Jung's insight:

Thanks to the Wang Family Foundation, a free downloadable pdf of Prof. Anthony W. Lee brilliant book "Picturing Chinatown: Art and Orientalism in San Francisco" is available.

 

If there is only one book you read on Chinese American history and how the camera or photographer constructs the public perception of Chinatown life, this should be the one!  Pardon the pun, but it is a real eye-opener and will change the way you think about photographic images and history.

 

If you appreciate Lee's insights, you can followup with " A Shoemaker's Story,"  his new brilliant photographic essay analyzing the historic 1870 Chinese shoemaker strike breakers in North Adams, Massachusetts. Note: this book is NOT free, but well worth reading!

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Chinese American WWII Vets Remember Flying Tigers Days

Chinese American WWII Vets Remember Flying Tigers Days | Chinese American history | Scoop.it

10/03/11

Last week, Chinese American World War II veterans of the legendary Flying Tigers reunited for their 68th Anniversary in New York City.

John Jung's insight:

Writer-journalist Victoria Moy honors the Chinese American vets connected with the fabled Flying Tigers airmen of WW II at their 68th annual reunion. She  describes the background of some of the men and the conditions of their participation in the war at a time when anti-Chinese discrimination was still rampart, 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

History of Chinese-White Intermarriage in North America

History of Chinese-White Intermarriage in North America | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
early marriages between chinese americans and european americans in the pacific northwest. Intermarriage and the resulting racial mixture had desirable effects.
John Jung's insight:

Links to documents and newspaper articles on the history of and social attitudes toward Chinese-white intermarriages, mostly Chinese men with white women. 

more...
No comment yet.