Chinese American history
11.1K views | +20 today
Follow
 
Scooped by John Jung
onto Chinese American history
Scoop.it!

Rebuilding Chinatown After the 1906 Quake

Historians recall how Chinatown, destroyed along with much of the city, almost wasn't rebuilt.
John Jung's insight:

Although Chinatown, like most of San Francisco, was devastated by the 1906 quake and fire, it rose anew from the ashes in a new form designed to be a tourist mecca as well as home to the Chinese community.  City leaders had decided to relocate Chinatown from its choice location to the mud flats around Hunter's point, but the Chinese prevailed and stayed.  

  

 

more...
No comment yet.
Chinese American history
Websites related to the history of Chinese in North America
Curated by John Jung
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Two Curated Collections of Websites on Chinese American History, Past and Present

John Jung's insight:

A brief guide to my 2 curated collections of websites on Chinese American history, past and present, on Scoop.It, and how to search the collection by keyword topics by typing the term in the

FUNNEL-looking icon in the upper right corner of this page next to suggestions.

 

(The previous method of using the FILTER window has been eliminated)

more...
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

The Siyi Region 四邑

The Siyi Region 四邑 | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
Winston Ho 何嶸.  Rutgers University, New Brunswick, Department of Asian Languages and Cultures 羅格斯大學東亞語言文化系. winstonho0805@gmail.com 2016 Aug. 7.   [Early twentieth-century map of the Siyi (Seiyap) Region, with the Pearl River Delta and Hong Kong to the east. The red lines are probably railroads.  Also note the doted lines representing oceanic trade routes to Southeast…
John Jung's insight:
The "mother lode" of 19th century and early 20th century Chinese immigrants to North America and many parts other of the world was the four agrarian counties of Guangdong in southern China. Winston Ho's article describes the geography and history of this region during that period. His map is especially helpful for descendants searching for their ancestral village location.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

The Madame Chiang Project

The Madame Chiang Project | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
The Madame Chiang Project utilizes a humanities-based approach to: (1) examine the day-to-day occurrences of Madame Chiang Kai-Shek's 1943 visit to Los Angeles and its impacts on the Chinese American community (via a photo tour format); (2) examine the impact of the sociopolitical circumstances of the 1930s and 1940s on the local, national, and global level…
John Jung's insight:
The Madame Chiang Project was created by UCLA students (Asian American Studies 187A  Doing Community History in Los Angeles Chinatown) taught by William Gow, to provide students with the research methodology to become public historians and document the history of an often overlooked Asian American community.

The hope is that the Madame Chiang Project will foster discussion about Madame Chiang Kai-Shek’s visit to Los Angeles in 1943 and its apparent impact on the American perceptions of Chinese via media sources, foster discussion about the unique sociopolitical circumstances that impacted the lives of Chinese Americans during the 1930s and 1940s, and how they affected the Chinese American identity, and spark interest in academic circles about the growing need for community-based research not only in Chinatown but all ethnic communities that are yet to truly historical document their own personal stories.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Yoland Skeete Research Files on Newark Chinatown – Asian/Pacific American Archives Survey Project

Yoland Skeete Research Files on Newark Chinatown – Asian/Pacific American Archives Survey Project | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
An Newark, N.J. had once had a thriving Chinatown (at its peak, there were 3,000 residents).  An artist living in the area, Yoland Skeete, embarked on an ambitious archival and archaeological research project to recover the largely forgotten history of the neighborhood and the people who once lived there.An impress
John Jung's insight:
An impressive archive of documents, interviews, photographs, audio recordings, collected by Yoland Skeete about the Newark, New Jersey, that no longer exists.  This research led to a book, When Newark Had A Chinatown, (Note: don;t try Amazon, which lists a ridiculously high price; check the publisher, Dorrance Publishing Online instead)
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

City of Austin - Pioneers from the East: First Chinese Families in Austin

City of Austin - Pioneers from the East: First Chinese Families in Austin | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
John Jung's insight:
"According to the 1875 Census there were 20 Chinese living in Austin. Most of these were men who left China to find work in order to support their families. Because of the Chinese Exclusion Act, they could not bring over their wives or children. These men worked mainly in the laundry or restaurant business." 

"Beginning in the 1870's the Chinese population in Travis County grew rather slowly until there was a large jump from 94 to 332 in the 1960's to the 1970's. Today, we have over 10,000 Chinese Americans in Austin working in many different industries. They share their culture and heritage and are constantly contributing to the great success of our city."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

The Opium Dens of Territorial Prescott - Sharlot Hall Museum Library & Archives

The Opium Dens of Territorial Prescott - Sharlot Hall Museum Library & Archives | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
John Jung's insight:
Opium smoking was not illegal until 1909 and was associated with Chinese immigrants in Prescott,Arizona, as in other communities with Chinese.  However, most Chinese did not use opium nor was its use limited to the Chinese as many whites also smoked opium.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Portland Chinese family stories of the adverse impact of the Chinese Exclusion Act

Portland Chinese family stories of the adverse impact of the Chinese Exclusion Act | Chinese American history | Scoop.it

Christine DeVillier of Portland has an immigration photo of her grandfather Bong Woon Lim, who entered the United States by boat under the name Wing Hun Lim at age 10 in 1921. (Courtesy of Christine De Villier)

John Jung's insight:
The Chinese Exclusion Act, started in 1882 and continuing in effect until 1943, not only barred the immigration of Chinese laborers, but disrupted the lives of many Chinese by separating family members for decades, in some instances. Those that managed to remain intact lived under the constant fear of deportation.   
Six examples from Portland Chinese vividly illustrate the adverse impact of the Chinese Exclusion Act.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

A coaching book used by a Paper Son

A coaching book used by a Paper Son | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
On the Records: Filled with details about life in southern China in 1923, a brown notebook may well be a “coaching” document intended to help an immigrant secure entry to the United States.
John Jung's insight:
During Chinese exclusion, Chinese resorted to trying to enter as paper sons, using documents belonging to someone entitled to immigrate. Here is an example of a coaching book used by a paper son to help him answer questions from Immigration officers to convince them he was the person he claimed to be.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Education | Chinese American: Exclusion/Inclusion

Education | Chinese American: Exclusion/Inclusion | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
What does it means to be an American? Chinese American: Exclusion/Inclusion explores this question as it chronicles the long and complex history of Chinese Americans [...]
John Jung's insight:
An excellent downloadable pdf of visual material and documents from the 2015-16 exhibit at the New York Historical Society, "CHINESE AMERICAN EXCLUSION/INCLUSION. It's the next best thing to seeing the exhibit itself, which will soon be on permanent display at the Chinese Historical Society of America in San Francisco Chinatown. Under the menu bar, select EDUCATION, and then click on "Curriculum Materials."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

National Archives Prologue Magazine | Spring 2016

National Archives Prologue Magazine | Spring 2016 | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
Prologue, Quarterly of the National Archives and Records Administration
John Jung's insight:
Using documents from immigration archives, Eddie Wong created a dramatization of the cases of 4 Chinese women who were brought to the U. S. by Chinese men under false promises that they would marry prosperous Chinese men. Instead they were forced into prostitution until they were able to escape and seek shelter and protection and eventually testify against their captors. Broken Blossoms reenacts their testimony.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Chinese Americans in Oregon

Chinese Americans in Oregon | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
John Jung's insight:
A comprehensive description and nuanced analysis of the historical, geographical, social, and economic factors affecting the lives and occupations of Chinese in Oregon starting from the early 1800s.  Excellent discussion of the increased heterogeneity of the cultural and geographical backgrounds, education levels, occupational skills, social class differences over time.  No longer exclusively from Cantonese villages, the Chinese in Oregon represent a diverse set of subgroups, sometimes at odds with each other.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Chinatown Gangs, Tongs

Chinatown Gangs, Tongs | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
Click here to edit the content
John Jung's insight:
Chinese were not only victims of racism but also harmed by bloody conflicts between rival gangs and tongs that terrorized Chinatowns around the country during the first quarter of the 20th century. This website focuses on the tong wars in Chicago but similar issues existed in other Chinatowns.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Origins of Undocumented Immigration

Origins of Undocumented Immigration | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
Patrick Ettinger talked about his book Imaginary Lines: Border Enforcement and the Origins of Undocumented Immigration, 1882-1930, in which he shares the…
John Jung's insight:
Patrick Ettinger discusses the history of immigration control policies and procedures starting in the late 19th century and points out that Chinese immigrants and their smugglers quickly learned to attempt entry through points along the Canadian and Mexican borders rather than through immigration stations at major ports.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Santa Ana Deliberately Burned Down Its Chinatown in 1906--And Let a Man Die to Do It

Santa Ana Deliberately Burned Down Its Chinatown in 1906--And Let a Man Die to Do It | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
The atmosphere was jovial as more than 1,000 people gathered in downtown Santa Ana on May 25, 1906, to watch their civic dream come true: th
John Jung's insight:
The Chinatown in Santa Ana, California, was unwelcome and ambivalent efforts were made at the beginning of the 20th century to get rid of it. When several Chinese came down with leprosy, fear of contagion was the catalyst that led to the burning down of the Chinese quarters.

Today, what was Santa Ana's Chinatown is hipster lofts and the parking lot behind the DGWB ad agency, which occupies the old City Hall (built in the 1930s, it replaced the City Hall that originally stood next to Chinatown). No marker stands anywhere in the area to commemorate its existence.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Chinese Brotherhoods, Clans, and Secret Societies in Vancouver's Chinatown

Learn about the lives and experiences of early Chinese pioneers in Canada. Brotherhoods, Clans and Secret Societies of Vancouver's Chinatown
John Jung's insight:
Although this excellent documentary of the  history and social function of various Chinatown organizations is based on Vancouver, British Columbia, it is very applicable to major Chinatowns across the U. S. aside from specific dates and names. 
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Biography of Charlie Soong, Father of the Soong Sisters

Biography of Charlie Soong, Father of the Soong Sisters | Chinese American history | Scoop.it

 "Charlie Soong: North Carolina's Link to the Fall of the Last Emperor of China", tells the little known story of the life of the father of 3 daughters, the Soong sisters, who were arguably the 3 most powerful women in the world during their lifetimes. Their husbands were   finance minister T. V.  Koong, revolutionary Sun-Yat Sen, and Generalissimo Chiang-Kai-Shek.

John Jung's insight:
Overshadowed by his 3 daughters, Charlie Soong was an important figure in China's history. He came to America just before the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 and attended seminaries in the American South before returning to China to promote Christianity. His contacts with missionaries in the South led him to send his daughters, Ai-Ling, Ching-Ling, and Mei-Ling, to Macon, Georgia in the early 1900s as wards of Rev. William Burke.

E. A. Haag 's biography traces Charlie Soong's life through his years in North Carolina and Tennessee. This website includes a video that presents about a minute of the historic speech of his daughter, Madame Chiang Kai-Shek, to the U. S. Congress in 1943.  http://www.charliesoonghistory.com/video.html

This speech of the first woman ever to address Congress was important in building ties between the U. S. and China in the fight against Japan in WW II, and is thought to have played a factor in the 1943 repeal of the Chinese Exclusion Act. Her flawless English, with a tinge of Southern drawl, helped make her a powerful voice.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Fong Wan, Chinese Herbalist , Restaurant-Night Club owner, Shrimping Company owner

Fong Wan, Chinese Herbalist , Restaurant-Night Club owner, Shrimping Company owner | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
John Jung's insight:
Fong Wan was a Chinese herbalist of some fame in Oakland, California in the mid 20th century who also ran a nightclub, New Shanghai Restaurant, that featured Chinese entertainers. He had time to run a shrimping business as well. 
His club was not as well known as Chinese nightclubs in San Francisco such as Charlie Low's Forbidden City, Kubla Khan, Andy Wong's Sky Room and  the Lion's Den and in fact he feuded with Charlie Low over claims of status.  



more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Jon Con Sang Came to Prescott, AZ. and earned enough to open stores in China, which he lost when Communist China

Jon Con Sang Came to Prescott, AZ. and earned enough to open stores in China, which he lost when Communist China | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
English class at the Congregational Church in Prescott, AZ. Charley Wan is in the back row at the far right (Call Number: BU-C-1069p – Reuse only by permission).
John Jung's insight:
Sometime in the 1880s Jon Con Sang emigrated from China to Prescott, Arizona, where he worked in restaurants, laundries, and for other people. Locals knew him as “Charley Wan.” By the late 1890s, he had saved enough to return to China and establish The Sincere Company Ltd. which grew to seven stores in the major cities of China. Charley Wan became a very wealthy man. However, after the Communist takeover of Mainland China in 1949, Sang lost all of his stores to the new regime except the one in Hong Kong.  

Half a century later, in1989, Charley Wan’s great-granddaughter, Diana Cheng (Jan) Yue and her family came to Prescott to see if the Sharlot Hall Museum had any documents and records associated with Charley Wan. When the archives staff showed them photographs and other items, there were tears of joy and surprise. Diana’s son and grandchildren were able to see their family through four generations in one photograph. They were able to see their aunts and uncles, cousins, nieces, nephews, and grandparents.

(Note: The photo of the g-g-granddaughter and her family mentioned in the blog  is missing from the post)
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Sharlot Hall Museum : Archives : Photographs

Sharlot Hall Museum : Archives : Photographs | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
Sharlot Hall Museum Digital Historic Arizona Photographs
John Jung's insight:
Some rarely seen historic photographs of early Arizona Chinese can be found in this searchable digital archive.  Just enter "Chinese" in the search box on the linked page.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Three letters 1946­-1948 between a Chinese-­American husband and wife (in Chinese with English translations).

Three letters 1946­-1948 between a Chinese-­American husband and wife (in Chinese with English translations). | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
This document is part of 'Early Chinese Immigration to the US', a primary source set for educational use.
John Jung's insight:
Three letters (in Chinese with English translation) (1948) between Charles Wong (Wong Mingzhu) and Flora Wong (born Lee Jong Hai). They were Chinese-Americans who owned a grocery on South Main St in Helena, Montana. The letters document the bureaucratic difficulties the couple had in getting Flora's exit papers from China. Their plight was similar to that of countless other Chinese couples separated by immigration problems until they could be reunited. The collection is part of an educational project about the difficulties of Chinese immigration.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

New York Chinatown's Historic Public School 23

In 1984 the New York Chinatown History Project took up residence in four rooms of 70 Mulberry Street. The museum was on the second floor; its gallery space designed by the NYC architects Billie Tsien and Tod Williams. 70 Mulberry Street was formerly Public School 23. The Norman Romanesque Revival building was constructed in 1892, and was one of the first school buildings designed by C.B.J. Snyder, a noted architect and Superintendent of School Buildings for the New York City Board of Education from 1891 to 1923. Schools designed by Snyder in other parts of the city have been landmarked (see the Census listing for P.S. 64/ El Bohio). Until it closed in 1976, many of Chinatown's children attended school at P.S. 23. The New York Chinatown History Project, which was subsequently named the Museum of Chinese in America (MoCA), hosted an exhibit called What Did You Learn In School Today? P.S. 23, 1893-1976.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

McGettrick Certificates

McGettrick Certificates | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
The McGettrick Certificate ListsThe USCIS History Office and Library has digitized and made available online the 1906 Bureau of Immigration publication McGettrick Certificates: List of Chinese Cases T
John Jung's insight:
The McGettrick Certificates (named after an Immigration Commissioner who heard cases of about 1,000 Chinese immigrants who crossed into northeastern U. S. from Canada around the 1890s), was not easily available until now.   

Each of the migrants listed claimed to be a U.S.-born citizen and the majority of them, after a hearing in front of U.S. Commissioner Felix W. McGettrick, received a “Certificate of Discharge” which could be used as proof of citizenship. Though many of these claims to citizenship were questionable the list of McGettrick Certificates should be of interest to anyone interested in the migration of Chinese to the east coast of the U.S.

On Thursday June 30, 2016 at 1 pm, Eastern Time there will be a webinar (it will NOT be taped) on how to use these documents.
 
To access the webinar, go to:  https://www.uscis.gov/HGWebinars ;
shortly before the scheduled start time and follow the “Attend Session” link under “Guide to I&N Research.”

You can also access the certificate files at:  http://u95007.eos-intl.net/U95007/OPAC/Details/Record.aspx?BibCode=9170556

Here is a sample of the men and their "fate"
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Boston Chinatown Atlas

Boston Chinatown Atlas | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
John Jung's insight:
An informative and comprehensive website, Boston Chinatown Atlas,  gives highlight of an ongoing project to present the story of Chinatown’s history, dynamics, and context, and to encourage future generations to appreciate the traditions and to preserve the community’s vitality. 

 Personal stories, photos, maps, and interactive features on the website provide an engaging view of Chinatown’s growth and change over more than a century.

The Chinatown Atlas concept originated more than 20-years ago between Tunney Lee and Randall Imai through a series illustrations of Chinatown.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Discrimination against Chinese Americans and Asians

Discrimination against Chinese Americans and Asians | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
Anti-Chinese USA: a long history of US policies and race laws sanctioning discrimination and the systematic persecution of ethnic Chinese and Asian immigrants.
John Jung's insight:
A detailed timeline and thoughtful discussion of history of discrimination against Chinese Americans, and other Asians.  Author concludes: 

"The mass media continue to project contradictory images that either dehumanize or demonize the Chinese, with the implicit message that they represent either a servile class to be exploited, or an enemy force to be destroyed. This has created and continues to create identity issues for generations of American-born Chinese: a sense of being different, or alien, in their own country; of being subjected to greater scrutiny and judged by higher standards than the general populace."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Chinese Prostitution in America in the Late 1800s & Social Perception in Regards to Cultural Attitudes and Filial Piety

Chinese Prostitution in America in the Late 1800s & Social Perception in Regards to Cultural Attitudes and Filial Piety | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
Filial piety describes a view common in Confucian and Buddhist thought of an overall respect,  love, and moral obligation to one's parents. More specifically, it specifies “to take care of one's parents;  not be rebellious; show love, respect and support; display courtesy; ensure male heirs; uphold fraternity among brothers; wisely advise one 's parents; conceal…
John Jung's insight:
"Women, however, occupied an inferior social status, whose purpose was to maintain their husband’s family, not their own; therefore they were less valuable to parents, and female infanticide was common. Women were considered property, a sell-able, trade-able luxury or commodity, owned by the overriding family patriarch....Chinese women were utilized by men in the United States to satisfy their needs, and within this social context that it was allowed to flourish and grow to such magnitude."
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by John Jung
Scoop.it!

Frederick Bee, Unheralded defender of Chinese immigrants

Frederick Bee, Unheralded defender of Chinese immigrants | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
Frederick Bee History Project
John Jung's insight:
Anthony Oertel, a local historian in Martinez, CA created an archive of historical documents related to Frederick Alonzo Bee, a little known fierce advocate for Chinese immigrants in the late 19th century.

Frederick Alonzo Bee was early opponent of Anti-Chinese sentiment in the United States. He was a California Gold Rush pioneer, miner, merchant, manager of the Pony Express, builder of the telegraph over the Sierras, developer of Sausalito, California, lobbyist for the San Francisco Chamber of Commerce, official at the Chinese Consulate, and vineyardist near Martinez, California. 

 Bee was appointed as Consul by the Chinese government after he effectively represented the interests of the Chinese community in front of a Congressional committee and settled disputes in Chinatown. Bee acted in an official capacity to represent the interests of Chinese immigrants, and appeared in federal court cases; his efforts to preserve harmony were recognized by the Emperor of China.

more...
No comment yet.