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West Volusia Historical Society

West Volusia Historical Society | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
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Lue Gim Gong was a Chinese immigrant who came as a young boy to work in a shoe factory in North Adams, Massachusetts.  The fierce winters led him to move to DeLand, Florida, where his horticultural skills acqired in China were applied to developing new oranges.

 

"In 1911, as one of his outstanding accomplishments, he cross-pollinated a "Hart's Late" with a "Mediterranean Sweet" and produced a new orange, the "Lue Gim Gong" (better known as the Valencia orange) which was more resistant to cold.  


A detailed biography is at: http://paulwmarino.org/lue-gim-gong.html


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Chinese American history
Websites related to the history of Chinese in North America
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Two Curated Collections of Websites on Chinese American History, Past and Present

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A brief guide to my 2 curated collections of websites on Chinese American history, past and present, on Scoop.It, and how to search the collection by keyword topics by typing the term in the

FUNNEL-looking icon in the upper right corner of this page next to suggestions.

 

(The previous method of using the FILTER window has been eliminated)

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The Chinaman (Fleischer, 1920) Clip - YouTube

A home movie clip of the early Max Fleischer inkwell cartoon THE CHINAMAN produced at Bray Studios in 1920. This has a racist speech balloon as well as an in...
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A view of how Chinese were demeaningly portrayed in a silent era animated film  of 1920.

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Chinese Laundries: Tickets to Survival on Gold Mountain - YouTube

Author John Jung speaks about origins of the book, its significance, and what he has learned from writing and giving talks about the book followed by Q & A d...
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Chinese laundries were so prevalent during the late 19th and early half of the 20th century that they came to be a stereotypical image of Chinese.  Barred from most other forms of businesses, Chinese opened laundries because this line of work was not contested initially. Laundry work was hard, but it gave the Chinese an economic niche for survival before other opportunities opened for them.

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Chinese Cemetery of Los Angeles - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Chinese Cemetery of Los Angeles

The Chinese Cemetery of Los Angeles is one of several historical cemeteries found around East Los Angeles, including Evergreen and Calvary cemeteries. It is located at First Street and Eastern Avenue in the Belvedere Gardens section of East Los Angeles.

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The cemetery was established by the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association of Los Angeles (CCBA) in 1922 to provide burial grounds for Chinese residents in Los Angeles.[1] At the time, all cemeteries in Los Angeles barred anyone of Chinese descent from purchasing burial plots

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Kentucky History: Chinese Americans

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Covington once had the most Chinese in all of Kentucky. Their story is very similar to that of Chinese in other communities all across America.

 

"The earliest mention of Chinese in Covington appears in the Ticket newspaper in 1877. The article dealt with the marriage of John Naw Lin, a Chinese American and Mary Ann Morgan of African American descent.

 

Chinese Americans rarely received any attention in the local press. The one exception was the celebration of the Chinese New Year. Reporters often covered the celebrations using racist language and stereotypes.

 

In 1913, the 14-year old Pong Dock, an American born citizen of Chinese descent registered to attend the Covington Public Schools. This event caused a minor furor in the city. Some Covington residents claimed that the boy should attend the African American School in Covington because he was not of European ancestry.

Eventually, Pong Dock was permitted to attend Covington’s First District School on Scott Street. He began the first grade in September 1913.

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Island Of Strangers

Island Of Strangers | Chinese American history | Scoop.it

ChThe life and death of Eureka's Chinatown

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An account of the infamous "driving out' of all Chinese from Eureka, CA. in 1885 and the destruction of its Chinatown and all traces of Chinese presence.

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Google Search Tips Poster for Your Class ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning

Google Search Tips Poster for Your Class ~ Educational Technology and Mobile Learning | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
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Helpful search tips for any topic

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Dime Novels: Old and Young King Brady, Secret Service in Chinatown

Dime Novels: Old and Young King Brady, Secret Service in Chinatown | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
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Dime Novels, a forerunner of pulp fiction, were popular media in the early 1900s. One of the most popular was Old and Young King Brady, two detectives whose stock in trade was to solve crimes in Chinatown, usually rescuing slave girls in opium dens run by tongs. This site shows 65 such issues related to this general theme.  They had a negative influence on the image of Chinese and Chinatown.

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The Chinese Slave Woman - Wikisource, the free online library

The Chinese Slave Woman - Wikisource, the free online library | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
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Charles Frederick Holder, a noted naturalist in southern California, wrote two papers in 1897 and 1900 about the problem of Chinese women who were sometimes kidnapped and brought to the U. S. as slaves forced into prostitution.  

He noted that,  "few Chinamen bring their wives with them, as they are here merely to earn a competency, when they will return, and all their money, or the greater part of it, is sent to China. yet there is a demand for women, and about it has grown up a business which a few years ago was the most valuable traffic in which the Chinese were engaged in America. It was fostered and carried on with the greatest care and secrecy;


See also: http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/Chinese_Slavery_in_America


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Curriculum on Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 Washington State History Society & Washington State History Museum

Curriculum on Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 Washington State History Society & Washington State History Museum | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
Washington State History Museum
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Two lesson plans developed in Washington State for middle school children related to the 1882 Chinese Exclusion Act and its relationship to how Chinese immigrant women were perceived. 

The Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 This treaty with the Chinese Government banned Chinese emigrants from entering America
 ...Housewives or Prostitutes? Chinese Women in Washington and ...Dong Oy was born in San Francisco and went back to China with her parents ...
 
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Chinese Laundries

Chinese Laundries | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
history of Chinese laundries
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A social history of Chinese laundries in North America with accounts of important and unusual incidents and cases from newspaper archives that supplement the information in my  book, "Chinese Laundries: Tickets to Survival on Gold Mountain."

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Chinese Labor and the Transcontinental Railroad, Golden Spike 1869

Chinese Labor and the Transcontinental Railroad, Golden Spike 1869 | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
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 Chinese labor in building the transcontinental railroads forms a central theme in writings about Chinese North American history but as the depiction of the laying of the "Golden Spike" in 1869 to complete the railroad coast to coast, Chinese workers got no recognition.

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Chinatown, Salt Lake City - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Chinatown, Salt Lake City

The U.S. city of Salt Lake City, Utah, has a Chinatown ( Chinese: 盐湖城唐人 ; pinyin: yán hú chéng táng rén jiē) that is located in South Salt Lake that was completed in 2012 according to the official website. According to the Deseret News , ground breaking on the new Chinatown occurred in 2011 for a Chinese-themed shopping mall with a "...

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In the late 19th century, Salt Lake City, Utah had a Chinese population that worked in the mining camps and the transcontinental railroad. The first Chinese peoples came in the 1860s and had formed a historical Chinatown in a section called "Plum Alley" on Second South Street which lasted until 1952 when it was razed and replaced with a Chinese shopping mall.

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East Meets West, Over Cocktails

East Meets West, Over Cocktails | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
The mid-20th-century world of Chinese nightclubs and their racial subtext are the subjects of a new book and gallery show.
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",,,, places like Forbidden City were a product of a more racist time: The clubs were packed because patrons often viewed the Chinese as some sort of exotic curiosity worth gawking at, and the talent was often first-rate because the Asian-American singers and dancers there struggled to find gigs anywhere else."

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America's Chinatowns - Archaeology Magazine

America's Chinatowns - Archaeology Magazine | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
Dozens of digs and collections are revealing the culture, diversity, and challenges of the first Chinese Americans
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Good account of how archeology can provide valuable new insights as well as confirmation of what other disciplines have found about the lives of early Chinese immigrants in the U. S.

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Chopsticks in the Land of Cotton: Lives of Mississippi Delta Grocers - YouTube

Excerpts from book talk by author John Jung at the Torrance, CA. Civic Center Library, Jan. 12, 2013 Help us caption & translate this video! http://amara.org...
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Chinese in the Mississippi Delta from the late 19th century started grocery market stores, often involving entire families, across the small towns near cotton plantations to serve black workers in the fields.  As times changed and earlier Chinese merchants died, retired, or moved away, these stores are few in number today but in their time they were an important part of these Delta communities.

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Home | Victoria's Chinatown

Home | Victoria's Chinatown | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
John Jung's insight:

Outstanding comprehensive site about the history of Chinatown, Victoria, British Columbia, a gateway for many of Canada's Chinese immigrants of the late 19th century.

 

"This Chinatown is also a major gateway to the development of Chinese communities in Canada. From the late nineteenth century to the first decade of the twentieth century, it was the largest Chinese settlement in Canada. Meanwhile, its merchant networks supplied new labourers, ethnic goods, and homeland news to numerous Chinese immigrant communities across the gold mines of British Columbia and along the Canadian Pacific Railway. In this Chinatown, the Chinese Consolidated Benevolent Association, the Hongmen Society (later called the Chinese Freemasons), and many clan and county associations served as early headquarters of Chinese communities across Canada."

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Chinese as Medical Scapegoats, 1870-1905 - FoundSF

Chinese as Medical Scapegoats, 1870-1905 - FoundSF | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
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Not only were Chinese denied entry to the U. S. after 1882, but around this time .... "the Chinese were to become medical scapegoats; up and down the Pacific coast (and in the Hawaiian Islands) local health officials rationalized the failure of their sanitary programs by tracing all epidemic outbreaks to living conditions among the Chinese. This phenomenon was to last for over thirty-five years. Only after Chinese immigration was finally curtailed, following implementation of the Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882 (and amendments of 1884), and only after scientific research began to unlock the mysteries of disease transmission did medical scapegoating begin to abate."
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"Tom Gunn

"Tom Gunn | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
Tom Gunn
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Born in San Francisco, Tom Gunn was a pioneer in aviation.  He represented China in the 1910 International Aviation Meet in Los Angeles and was dubbed the "Wright of China."

 

When revolution erupted in China in1911, Gunn was contacted by Sun Yat-Sen to popularize aviation.  

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Discovering Angel Island Immigration Detention Center: The Story Behind the Poems That Chinese Carved on the Walls

From 1910 to 1940, tens of thousands of immigrants entered the United States through the West Coast's Angel Island Immigration Station. Located in San Franci...
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Angel Island Immigration Station in San Francisco bay, Island where thousands of Chinese and other immigrants between 1910 and 1940 were detained was scheduled for demolition around 1970.


Fortunately, Alexander Weiss, a California State Park Ranger, re-discovered them in 1970. His chance discovery began the long journey to save the Immigration Station, and ultimately, to save the stories hidden within it through carved poems on the walls, and to help us remember its sad, but important role in American history/"

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bostonese.com English-Chinese Online Journal / 波士顿双语网

bostonese.com English-Chinese Online Journal / 波士顿双语网 | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
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Seeing the actual 'red tape' or documentation that was involved for Chinese immigrants can provide deeper understanding of the extent to which Immigration authorities controlled their entry to the U. S. This case of Ng Shee in 1931 involved the wife of a Chinese who was a U. S. citizen. Part of her interrogation including a map she had to draw of her Guangdong village to prove she was telling the truth is included.

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Historian Recounts Role of Chinese Americans Who Fought in US Civil War

Historian Recounts Role of Chinese Americans Who Fought in US Civil War | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
Many people would be surprised to know that there were some Asian faces in the crowds of white and black soldiers serving in the American Civil War.
The participation of Asians, and in particula...
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Historian Ruth Lum McCunn describes the contribution of Chinese Americans in the Civil War.  

"Even though there were only about 200 Chinese-Americans living in the eastern United States at the time, 58 of them fought in the Civil War, mainly for the North, but a handful for the South as well. Because of their previous experiences at sea, many of them served in the U.S. Navy. Only one Chinese-American soldier was actually born on American soil.  The rest had come to the U.S. through the Pacific slave trade, adoption by Americans, independent immigration or the influence of missionaries." 

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The History Project

The History Project | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
Discipline-specific professional development programs for history teachers that raise student achievement by bolstering standards-based content knowledge and modeling effective instructional practices.
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A high school history lesson plan for examining the 1878 

California Constitutional Convention. Over twenty years of conflict over Asian immigration into California fueled heated debate over the Chinese presence at the convention, and was a forerunner of the eventual Chinese Exclusion Act of 1882.

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Home

Home | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
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Elwin Xie's  comprehensive resource on the history and significance of the Chinese laundry in Canada, which parallels its role for Chinese in the U. S. and other countries.  Site contains links to other web resources related to Chinese immigrant businesses such as laundries and restaurants.

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Chinese American Women: A History of Resilience and Resistance

Chinese American Women: A History of Resilience and Resistance | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
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A legendary figure, Polly Bemis, was an early Chinese woman immigrant in Idaho. She was sold by her parents, smuggled into Oregon, sold as a concubine to a Chinese merchant, and became the 'wife' to a white man, Charlie Bemis, who allegedly won her in a poker game.  She later became an accomplished fisherwoman and became a celebrity of sorts.  Her log cabin in Idaho was restored as a museum. A biography by Ruth Ann McCunn, made into the movie, A Thousand Pieces of Gold," tells her amazing story.  http://www.mccunn.com/TPOG.html

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The Chinese in Columbia, Calif. 1850-1930

The Chinese in Columbia, Calif. 1850-1930 | Chinese American history | Scoop.it
Activities and events in the Historic State Park of Columbia, California.
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A meticulously detailed history of Chinese in Columbia, California.

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